Nick

Members
  • Content count

    585
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

11 Good

About Nick

  • Rank
    I Love Bass Fishing!
  • Birthday 12/02/1953

Profile Information

  • Gender Male
  • Location Missouri
  • My PB Please Choose
  • Favorite Bass Please Choose
  1. I'm a co angler arriving Monday for the Hartwell event, and I could use a roommate at the Best western motel in Seneca. I'll know tomorrow for sure if one half of the room is available.  Good luck. I thought the field was full already. Did you get a confirmation letter?
  2. Must Have Smallmouth Lures?

    Creek Crappie, The Center Hill and Dale Hollow smallmouth wuld be somewhat more specialized and somewhat different quarry than a Great Lakes, Missouri Ozarks streams,  or New York smallie for several reasons that we need not go into.   Fishing these Tennessee impoundments is best mostly at night except in March-April during the spawn and in winter with the floatin fly daylight hours work. These lakes really demand finesse approaches most of the time during the day with lighter lines, smaller lures, and often deeper presentations. I would rate these lakes quite difficult for beginners, so if you live near a stream or creek that has smallies, you will be able to be much more successful in a much shorter amount of time.    These large impoundments  will demand that you have a solid boat with good electronics and a decent knowledge of structural elements, food sources, and current that will help position these fish. Only during the spawn can you fish successfully by hugging the banks, so the other 49 weeks of the year, it can get a little daunting for a beginner.   Creek and stream smallies, by their aggressive nature, can be had just about any time by anyone who can cast small lures decently along the banks. Not saying this is always the best way to catch loads of big smallies, but you will have success fishing for them if the water supports a decent population., and you give a solid daylong effort. You often need just a canoe, kayak or just go wading, and these fish are not usually finicky. A few four inch green pumpkin worms, small crayfish cranks, a small white or chartreuse spinnerbait will work nearly 100% of the time fished on 6 or 8 lb. line unless you encounter high muddy water.  If that is the case just wait a couple of days for the water to gets back into fishing shape, (clears up a little.)   So if I were you, I would start a serious campaign of gathering info on running water smallies near you for best results and forget the big lakes for now.
  3. Must Have Smallmouth Lures?

    Creek Crappie, The Center Hill and Dale Hollow smallmouth wuld be somewhat more specialized and somewhat different quarry than a Great Lakes, Missouri Ozarks streams,  or New York smallie for several reasons that we need not go into.   Fishing these Tennessee impoundments is best mostly at night except in March-April during the spawn and in winter with the floatin fly daylight hours work. These lakes really demand finesse approaches most of the time during the day with lighter lines, smaller lures, and often deeper presentations. I would rate these lakes quite difficult for beginners, so if you live near a stream or creek that has smallies, you will be able to be much more successful in a much shorter amount of time.    These large impoundments  will demand that you have a solid boat with good electronics and a decent knowledge of structural elements, food sources, and current that will help position these fish. Only during the spawn can you fish successfully by hugging the banks, so the other 49 weeks of the year, it can get a little daunting for a beginner.   Creek and stream smallies, by their aggressive nature, can be had just about any time by anyone who can cast small lures decently along the banks. Not saying this is always the best way to catch loads of big smallies, but you will have success fishing for them if the water supports a decent population., and you give a solid daylong effort. You often need just a canoe, kayak or just go wading, and these fish are not usually finicky. A few four inch green pumpkin worms, small crayfish cranks, a small white or chartreuse spinnerbait will work nearly 100% of the time fished on 6 or 8 lb. line unless you encounter high muddy water.  If that is the case just wait a couple of days for the water to gets back into fishing shape, (clears up a little.)   So if I were you, I would start a serious campaign of gathering info on running water smallies near you for best results and forget the big lakes for now.
  4. Jerkbait Help/ Advice

    Been slinging suspending jerks for a few decades myself. Conditions do change and what the bass want changes, but it's been my experience that finding the fertile ground to jerkbait fish is undoubtedly most important variable to control- way more so that brand, color, movement, or even lure depth. Since I fish them mostly now at Lake of the Ozarks, I'm constantly looking for shad at the depth level within the range where my jerkbait will suspend.  Sounds easy, but lots of guys just go down any banks fishing them regardless of the presence of suspended food fish. When the shad are hugging the bottom, rareIy do I have a good catching day with jb's. can look at my locator and pretty well tell when I get to a patch of busted up shad, that is, smaller clumps of scattered that indicate they have been targeted by gamefish. I often tell my buddy in the boat next to me to get ready for a strike, and it happens pretty frequently when I see the right formations on my screen. After location of food at the proper depth, then one can tweak the color, speed/tempo, action to get even better results. Particularly if one guy in the boat is getting the vast majority of strikes, then through comparison, better start copying what he is doing. Sometimes it's pretty subtle.  I do find it interesting that on Lake Ozark, a very good jb lake, that the suspending Rogue was supplanted by the Pointer which in turn was supplanted by the Megabass brand these last two decades. It's hard to argue against the Megabass brand for its casting distance and fish catching abilities.  It tends to suspend tail down often, but occasionally rides parallel to the surface. For those wanting to save a few bucks, the Lucky Strike Clunn model works pretty much the same, but the internal weights can be fussy, and the lips are slightly smaller than the 3x more expensive Megabass. I'm not saying the Megabass 110 is always better, but it's really hard to argue tournament results around here. Like Bo says, and we have won money before together jerk baiting, sometimes bass want something different for no apparent reason. At times, the could prefer a painfully slow sinking model that will get down to the 10-12 foot level with a quicker quiver than a spoonbill will give, but there are times that the fish want a spoonbill, wide wobble. And some around here even drill holes in a floater Rogue to make them sink in a circular pattern as deep as the angler wants and they can be deadly at times. So the real key is to be flexible and not tied in to one approach or lure. Sometimes the retrieve pattern makes a difference, but I like to fish them as fast as I can as long as I'm getting bit.  I'll cover more water that way.  I might actually only suspend and slow it down for 6-8 feet during a long retrieve(and I might hold it still for 6-10 seconds in a preferred zone) when I'm really dialed in to the location. Faster can be better when fishing against the clock. As far as fishing the xrap, go for it.  They catch lots of bass, and it can be slowed down and stopped in any temperature to match the bass' wants. I kind of like that little, cute fly tail too. It can be a trigger. I would agree that braid gives better feel, and I think working a jb with just the tiniest bit of slack in the line gives that bait more wiggle room if desired.  I like to move my rod tip at the 8 o'clock position about 2-3 inches before I feel the lure pull tight. I think I get better twitches that way if the bass want a sharper twitch. For economy, I can't find a way to beat straight Yozuri hybrid in 8 or 10 lb. test, and a 6'9" medium rod, and a quality bait caster. I get decent feel, and I don't break off like I did with flouro. For me jb fishing is done below 50 at it's most effective, and below 39 degree water temps, I have a much tougher time like everyone else I know. 
  5. Oldschool Horizontal Jigging

    Nu Jig is ramping up for production. Bo James, the creator of both jigs is reverting back to the old style weedguards with three sizes whereas Alpha is still using the double brush guard design. The moderators of this forum did not appreciate the Alpha jig discussion last year, but the proof of this jig's effectiveness is undeniable. Bo actually nade this jig in ther 80's as the Viper Jig, but it was discontinued over disputes over manufacturing rights. (Quite a tale of woe.) I'm rooting for my old buddy to get this jig out to the public very soon. Let the jig revolution beign!
  6. Humminbird News Fyi

    Another expensive load of crap for the gullible.
  7. You might try throwing those Kingfishers anywhere that's just plain jungle. Pretty hard to snag them.