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What's The Difference In These Rods?


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#1 mtaag3

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Posted March 28 2013 - 11:16 PM

So I understand the descriptions of rods; medium, medium/heavy heavy, etc. and the tip speed, fast, medium fast, etc. But in looking in a couple of places, Academy, BPS, etc. I am seeing lure specific rods i.e. Crankbait rods, Spinnerbait rods, Worm rods. Why are these rods "exclusive" (I understand they're a recommendation) to these lure types and what sets them apart from the "traditional" action indicators? If I ever want a spinnerbait rod should I get one designed for that or just get a rod that has the characteristics needed to cast a _____ effectively? 

 

On a side note I can already tell I'm going to have a crap load of gear...but trying to resist.  :dazed-7:



#2 WRB

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Posted March 28 2013 - 11:50 PM

Most bass anglers like slower action rods like glass or eglass (blend of glass & graphite) for easemofmcastingnand more forgiving when using treble hooks, like crank baits. A spinner bait rod is similarmto a crank bait rod, except moderate fast for ease of casting and a little more hook setting power.
The bottom line is you can use a moderate fast spinnerbait rod for both cranks and spinnerbaits, not so good vice a versa.
Tom

#3 Jrob78

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Posted March 29 2013 - 12:14 AM

First, E-glass is not a blend of graphite and fiberglass.  E-glass is a type of fiberglass that some rods are made from.  Fiberglass in rods will normally be either E-glass or S-glass.  Fiberglass and graphite blended together is generally called composite.  These blanks are used for crankbaits and live bait, most of the time.

 

The technique specific rods are usually what the rod company had in mind when they designed the rod, possibly to suit their pro staff.  On most of these rods, the power and action are also listed.  You don't have to use the rod for the technique listed, it's just a suggestion.  In my opinion, the rod companies have started doing this because it encourages people to buy a different rod for every technique.  It is a subtle sales pitch.  Use your brain to decide what rods you want to use for different techniques, if you go solely by what's written on the rod, you might end up disappointed.  What works for one person might not work for the next.



#4 tomustang

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Posted March 29 2013 - 02:13 AM

 If I ever want a spinnerbait rod should I get one designed for that or just get a rod that has the characteristics needed to cast a _____ effectively? 

  :dazed-7:

 

This. Technique Specific really pushes more of a 'buy more' standpoint. If you look around you'll notice there's techniques that utilize same actions/tapers but similar rod lengths. Personal height, your feel (in your hands), and where you're fishing (boat/land) will affect the outcome of length so the specific might not even match up for you.


Tom

 

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#5 solo_bro

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Posted March 29 2013 - 03:49 AM

If anything have one rod for flipping and pitching medium heavy - fast/moderate action, one for finesse baits medium - fast action, and one for crankbait/medium-small swimbaits medum heavy - moderate action. 



#6 Arv

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Posted March 29 2013 - 06:09 AM

The biggest thing I pay attention to when I look for a rod is the specs (power and action). I can't tell you one time I bought a rod because it was a designated spinnerbait rod, worm rod, etc. I like a moderate action on my treble hook lures and a F-XF action on pretty much everything else. Also, ratings don't usually stay too consistent between different rod companies, or even with in different line ups from the same company. My best advice when looking for a new rod is to ask questions of the people that have used them before. They can tell you how it fishes, if its true to its power/action, etc., etc.



#7 motodmast

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Posted March 29 2013 - 09:21 AM

Those technique specific rods are nice, but i think therr a load of b.s. sometimes. Is there really that big of a difference between a worm/ jig rod and a spinnerbait rod? Not really. Almost 99.9% of the people i know use a MH fast action rod to throw there spinnerbaits on, which is also the same rod they throw jigs and pladtics on.
If i were you i would carry 4-5 rods and you would be set.
1. Two 7'1 -7'3 MH fast action rods, to throw plastics and jigs on. You can use these rods for t-rigs, c-rigs, spinnerbaits, buzzbaits, small swimbaits, all your plastic bait needs. And have two, that way you spend less time retying on new baits. i would run 17lb fluorocarbon on one, and 14on the other.
2. A 7'6 MH fast action rid with 50lb braid. Use this rod to punch, frog, flip and pitch to heavy cover areas.
3. A 7' medium or MH moderate action rod for all your cranking needs, including topwater. Run mono or fluorocarbon line
4. A 7' medium fast action spinning rod for all your finesse stuff like drop shot, shakey head, wacky worm, small grubs, i would run 15lb braid to 6-8lb fluorocarbon on this setup.

With that setup, you should be able to cover just about any technique you want to and need to use.
Hope that helps some, and helps you understand that you can use one rod for multiple purpose's and dont have to have 10-12 technique specific rods just to be able to fish those techniques correctly. Its all marketing by the fishing companys...

SOrry for any mis spelling, im on my phone lol

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~Lews Reels (http://www.lews.com/reels)

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~ Limit Out Performance Marine (http://www.limitoutmarine.com/)


#8 Teal

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Posted March 29 2013 - 10:57 AM

My opinion is base line stuff is good when you are starting until you figure out what YOU like and what works for YOU. Because on most technique specific rods are based on opinions and research of the builders and their pro staff. Notice i said opinions.

A good example is spinner bait rods, i personally like an XF tip on a spinner bait rod... but alot of the technique specific rods are Mod fast or Fast.

I guess what im trying to say is, YOU BE THE PRO THAT IS TESTING THE RODS. Use the base line knowledge and figure it out... that said, there are some EXTREMELY GOOD tech spef rods out there.

Remember when lookingthe at rodsthe not all powers and actions are created equal. Try to get your hands on the yourself and handle it.

Good luck.

#9 HeavyDluxe

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Posted March 29 2013 - 11:23 AM

Great stuff in this thread!

 

The technique specific rods are usually what the rod company had in mind when they designed the rod, possibly to suit their pro staff.  On most of these rods, the power and action are also listed.  You don't have to use the rod for the technique listed, it's just a suggestion.  In my opinion, the rod companies have started doing this because it encourages people to buy a different rod for every technique.  It is a subtle sales pitch.

 

We all like shiny things, and we anglers have a particular propensity to feel like there's one [rod/reel/line/lure] that will revolutionize our fishing.  Fishing tackle manufacturers capitalize on this.

 

Neither of those is a bad thing, mind you.  But I wager most of us would be far better served by working on improving our ability to analyze water and find fish as opposed to adding more techniques and gear.  YMMV.

 

If anything have one rod for flipping and pitching medium heavy - fast/moderate action, one for finesse baits medium - fast action, and one for crankbait/medium-small swimbaits medum heavy - moderate action. 

 

Great advice.  I would go so far as to say an angler could easily get by with two - the MH/F and M/F.  With care, these can be leveraged to cover just about everything you'll find.  The only downside to fewer rods is the need to re-tie every time you switch tactics.

 

FWIW, that's the setup I'm taking to the water this year after getting by all last year on a M/F only.  

 

(Ok, that's technically not true... I carry an UL/M rod as well for whenever I want giggles. :) )



#10 mjseverson24

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Posted March 29 2013 - 12:46 PM

I personally like the technique specific rods very much, but mainly because fishing tournaments I usually have 20 combos rigged up, about 15 casting, and 5 spinning. Every one of the rods I use is set up to maximize a specific technique. that being said depending upon your skill level and interest in the sport, this will dictate the number of rods you should carry. obviously 1 



#11 mjseverson24

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Posted March 29 2013 - 12:49 PM

hmm... an error occurred and it posted too early... but obviously 1 rod is the minimum to get away with, but I think three rods would be a good number for a recreational fisherman. one 7' m/L finnesse spinning rod combo, one 7' medium casting and one 7'6" MH casting. with these three rods most common techniques can be covered. otherwise the six rod system is a good choice.

 

Mitch



#12 solo_bro

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Posted March 29 2013 - 06:11 PM

The technique specific rods are usually what the rod company had in mind when they designed the rod, possibly to suit their pro staff.  On most of these rods, the power and action are also listed.  You don't have to use the rod for the technique listed, it's just a suggestion.  In my opinion, the rod companies have started doing this because it encourages people to buy a different rod for every technique.  It is a subtle sales pitch.  Use your brain to decide what rods you want to use for different techniques, if you go solely by what's written on the rod, you might end up disappointed.  What works for one person might not work for the next.

 

I totally agree it all about getting you to buy more. People don't even realize the Alabama Rig/large swimbait, same rod, medium large crankbaits and small swimbaits, same rod. Dropshot and a finesse bait, same rod. Flipping, pitching and spinnerbait, same rod.



#13 HeavyDluxe

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Posted March 29 2013 - 06:28 PM

In fairness, I'm willing to grant that there are probably subtle differences between those rods that make them, honestly, different models.  At least with more reputable companies, I would bet that there's truth in advertising.

 

But, is the difference really enough to warrant so much specialized equipment?  Well, I suppose it is if that's how you choose to spend your bucks. :)



#14 K_Mac

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Posted March 29 2013 - 07:58 PM

...But, is the difference really enough to warrant so much specialized equipment?  Well, I suppose it is if that's how you choose to spend your bucks. :)

 

And that pretty much sums it up. Yes there are some differences in many technique specific rods. A drop shot rod is a good example. I use a MF spinning rod that works OK. My fishing partner has a GLoomis rod designed for the technique and it is a much better rod for that task. If I had the space and cash, I would have exactly the right rod for every purpose. Most of us don't, so we find equipment that does many things reasonably well. Nothing wrong with that; just as there is nothing wrong with someone having many rods, with each one designated for a very specific purpose. It's all good.

 

Edit: Just because a manufacturer puts a specific purpose on a rod does not mean it will be what I/you want for that technique. I have rod that a friend gave to me because it says it is a deep crankbait rod. It is not! It is a very good pitching rod though. 


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