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Casting A Baitcaster


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#1 bassassasin1

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Posted October 26 2013 - 03:00 PM

I am looking foward to buying myself a baitcaster combo for christmas(for now I use spinning reels).So for know I use another combo for practise,and I've already mastered how to hold a baitcaster.The only problem is how do I feather the line off the spool when casting.It kind of mystifies me how the pros are able to cast far,but still keep their thumb on the line.So I'm wondering how do you guys''feather'' the line off the spool and still get it very far.If I can master this,I can finally be comfortable buying such an expensive combo and at least know how to use it properly.



#2 seekonkBass

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Posted October 26 2013 - 03:42 PM

I have found that if I lightly (gently) rest my thumb on the spool I can get a ton of distance and still control the speed by increasing or decreasing pressure as needed. It really is just a matter of getting used to it and practicing.  


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#3 new2BC4bass

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Posted October 26 2013 - 03:57 PM

I try to keep my thumb just off the spool.  That way it doesn't slow the spool down, and I can feel when the line starts to"fluff".  This is the point where you should lightly touch the spool to slow it down.  Too often my optimism overrides my common sense, and I let it go....to my regret.  :sad78:

 

I do get lucky sometimes, and the lure catches up to the spool. :teeth3:


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#4 Delaware Valley Tackle

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Posted October 26 2013 - 05:30 PM

Practice with a relatively heavy weight (3/4 oz) and set the spool tension tight (so the weight barely drops) Make easy lob casts. Muscling a cast is the surest way to get in trouble with a baitcaster. You can peel off 1 1/2 casts worth of line and put a strip of electrical tape on the spool. That way when you do get a backlash it won't go too deep. Biggest thing is to just keep practicing
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#5 Smokinal

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Posted October 26 2013 - 05:50 PM

I try to keep my thumb just off the spool.  That way it doesn't slow the spool down, and I can feel when the line starts to"fluff".  This is the point where you should lightly touch the spool to slow it down.  Too often my optimism overrides my common sense, and I let it go....to my regret.  :sad78:

 

I do get lucky sometimes, and the lure catches up to the spool. :teeth3:

X2 on the feeling the fluff. It takes practice and a light touch but you will feel it.

 

Practice with a relatively heavy weight (3/4 oz) and set the spool tension tight (so the weight barely drops) Make easy lob casts. Muscling a cast is the surest way to get in trouble with a baitcaster. You can peel off 1 1/2 casts worth of line and put a strip of electrical tape on the spool. That way when you do get a backlash it won't go too deep. Biggest thing is to just keep practicing

Def start out with an easy casting, heavier bait like a trap. I bucked baitcasters for 25 yrs and finally wanted to see what all the fuss was about. Now, I only throw a spinning rod about 3% of the time. If I could add a tip, that would be to not get a cheap rig and try to learn with it. A cheap reel will not cast well and will leave you more frustrated with the whole procedure. Be confident that you will learn it and get a quality setup. It will actually make the learning easier.



#6 Bassfink86

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Posted October 27 2013 - 08:11 AM

I agree with smokinal, get a good reel something at least $80+ if you don't you will only be hurting yourself.



#7 new2BC4bass

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Posted October 27 2013 - 09:36 AM

Mike is absolutely right about muscling a cast.  I find myself doing it on ocassion.  Easing up just a little results in casts just as long, but without backlashes.



#8 John G

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Posted October 27 2013 - 01:16 PM

Practice with a relatively heavy weight (3/4 oz) and set the spool tension tight (so the weight barely drops) Make easy lob casts. Muscling a cast is the surest way to get in trouble with a baitcaster. You can peel off 1 1/2 casts worth of line and put a strip of electrical tape on the spool. That way when you do get a backlash it won't go too deep. Biggest thing is to just keep practicing

X4

 

To the OP,

 

You can adjust the reel so you can cast all day and not use your thumb. You need to understand that a backlash occurs because the spool is spinning faster than the lure is traveling. Your magnetic brake or centrifugal brake adjusted all the way on can help greatly in slowing the spool down during the first part of the cast.. The spool tension knob will help control the over runs at the end of the cast.

 

Buy a quality reel! Buy a quality reel! Buy a quality reel!

 

I have only casted one baitcaster other than a Shimano and I had trouble even getting a decent cast. I can cast my Shimano's with no problems and unless there is a mishap, like the lure snagging on brush when I make an underhand cast, I can cast as long as I fish without getting a backlash.

 

The other rod/reel combo that I casted was a KVD combo from WalMart. That combo made me look like a rookie.

 

The lure weight was probably a little more tha 3/8oz and even with the dial turned all the way on and the spool tension knob adjusted tighter than I like, the cast was nothing to brag about.

 

Maybe that KVD reel is quality but it definitely needed a lot more weight tied on the end of the line than it had for me to effectively cast it.  



#9 Hattrick7

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Posted October 27 2013 - 03:40 PM

The only use my thumb at the end of the cast right before it hits the water. Except if I want the bait to stop at a certain distance.




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