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Javelin200

Casting Distance

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After reading a few threads floating around on various fishing related sites questioning "which baitcasting rod/reel/combo casts farther?", I've become curious as to what different fisherman perceive "farther" actually is. Aside from competition casting, what is a reasonable distance for the average angler to expect to chunk say a 3/4 - 1 oz deep crankbait with today's equipment? Is there a specific 'benchmark' to strive for distance wise for any given bait or technique? What do YOU consider sufficient distance based on your equipment / ability?

My best measured casting effort is 145' from my my slop frog set-up (Spro Bronzeye on 30# Spiderwire, an old Browning Aggressor reel, and equally old 7' MH BPS Walleye Extreme Spoon Rod). My crank rigs will get me close to 130'. My average maximum casting distance ranges from 100' - 120' with most of my other rigs, depending on the bait.

I mean, how far can ol' Kevin Van Wattsizname sling a Redeye Shad, and should I ever expect to achieve the same results as him?

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My best casting distance that I measured was 125 feet using a 3/8 oz. spinnerbait on a surprisingly short rod, a 6' medium powered Quest LS-7 from Dick's and a BPS Extreme baitcast reel. I've casted to the same area using a 6'6" Shimano Compre rod also. I'm sure if I'd try something heavier that it would probably go farther. At the time I was practice casting to targets in the back yard and I just decided to see how far it would go with different baits so I began trying them.

For me, all I need is 70 to 100 feet for most things, and the 100 is a real stretch. 70 to 80 works great from a boat. There are occasions where I want as long a cast as possible such as shore fishing at the river here where casting into the current and reeling into calm water is needed. That's when I want the most distance possible.

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The required casting distance depends on the situation. Clear, shallow water, you may want to stay 50-75' from your target. Longer casts are beneficial for fishing deep cranks so the bait has time to dive and stay in the strike zone longer. I focus more on accuracy than distance. If you're shore bound, nothing beats a properly set up spinning rig for raw distance casting.

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My best casting distance that I measured was 125 feet using a 3/8 oz. spinnerbait on a surprisingly short rod, a 6' medium powered Quest LS-7 from Dick's and a BPS Extreme baitcast reel. I've casted to the same area using a 6'6" Shimano Compre rod also. I'm sure if I'd try something heavier that it would probably go farther. At the time I was practice casting to targets in the back yard and I just decided to see how far it would go with different baits so I began trying them.

For me, all I need is 70 to 100 feet for most things, and the 100 is a real stretch. 70 to 80 works great from a boat. There are occasions where I want as long a cast as possible such as shore fishing at the river here where casting into the current and reeling into calm water is needed. That's when I want the most distance possible.

I am not saying that you haven't already done this but, I always challenge people to go to the local football field and stand at the goal line and cast. Guys throw around numbers about distance without really KNOWING how far it really is. Try it. What I do sometimes in the yard is to make a cast and then count steps to where the bait landed. That would be approximate yards. Multiply by three for feet.

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I am not saying that you haven't already done this but, I always challenge people to go to the local football field and stand at the goal line and cast. Guys throw around numbers about distance without really KNOWING how far it really is. Try it. What I do sometimes in the yard is to make a cast and then count steps to where the bait landed. That would be approximate yards. Multiply by three for feet.

Divide by 3 for feet.

I've used google earth to measure casts on my ponds. 100 feet isn't unbelievable.

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Dave was right, multiply by 3 to get feet from yards. 5 yards = 15 feet

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I have a back yard that is 125 feet deep, so I measured it out with a tapeline, marked off every 10 feet with stakes, and began casting. That's how I know what it was in length. I casted it over the fence into the neighbor's yard. I'm definitely not throwing around numbers.

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I have a book called "Precision Casting" that gives dive profiles and max depths for commercial crankbaits. The data is getting a little outdated since it was published in 2000. There are lots of new crankbaits since 2000 and some of the baits tested are no longer current. But it's worth reading just to learn some truths about how crankbaits really operate when you get rid of the advertising hoopla and have a scuba diver measure their performance over a measured depth/distance course. The guys who did the testing had to establish average and long casts when they set up their crankbait test course so they took a group of experienced fishermen and had them cast various crankbaits, then measured them and averaged them out. When asked to make an "average cast", the distance was 70 ft. When asked to make a long cast, it was 100 ft. You hear lots of off-hand assertions about 75-100 YARD casts by pro fishermen. That's 225-300 ft. Uh- uh. I just don't believe it.

I say don't get wrapped around the axle about casting distance. If you wing one out there 150 ft and a fish bites it, you're probably in big trouble anyway. It's not a casting contest, it's about hooking and boating fish. If the target is farther than you can cast accurately and comfortably, and too far away to get a good hookset, MOVE THE BOAT CLOSER.

BTW, at casting distances more than 100 ft, max depths reached by crankbaits did not increase, and that was pretty uniform across all types/brands. That's because lift on the line increases as the amount of line out increases, and it offsets the crankbait's effort to dive deeper when about 100 ft of line is out.

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.....BTW, at casting distances more than 100 ft, max depths reached by crankbaits did not increase, and that was pretty uniform across all types/brands. That's because lift on the line increases as the amount of line out increases, and it offsets the crankbait's effort to dive deeper when about 100 ft of line is out.

Makes perfect sense, but I would think it fair to surmise the bait would have opportunity to run at that max depth for a greater distance....which to my way of thinking is the goal in maximizing casting distance.

Good info BTW. Thanks.

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KVD said with his set up we could consistently get 70+yards with his crankbait set up. That is 210ft. Thats some huge distances. Thats extreme, but I think it could consistently be done with good conditioned equipment, a longer pole (7' +), and a heavy bait, (maybe some wind to your back wouldn't hurt) lol. Like stated above, measure this by the length of a football field. Any distance in that range is a possibility and shouldn't be incredibly hard to match until you get beyond 50yds or so. Bait selection will matter a great deal in this too.

http://www.strikeking.com/journal/00311/5.php

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Makes perfect sense, but I would think it fair to surmise the bait would have opportunity to run at that max depth for a greater distance....which to my way of thinking is the goal in maximizing casting distance.

Good info BTW. Thanks.

Yes, I agree about casting distance, to a point. More data from the Precision Casting tests: Although they max out at different depths, different brands and models of crankbaits are very uniform in the shape of their dive profiles. On a long 100 ft cast, a crankbait runs at its max depth between 40 and 10 ft from the boat. On an average 70 ft cast, its 30 and 10 ft at max depth. So you are casting 30 ft longer but the bait is at max depth for 10 ft longer. You're getting diminishing returns for your longer casts.

A real-life example. You're throwing a Suspending DD-22 on 10 lb copolymer line and making 100 ft casts, trying to hit an 17 ft deep rockpile. That crankbait, on that line, maxes out at 17 1/2 ft, so it's "reachable". But an important thing to remember is what the dive profile says about boat positioning. If the target is at the crankbait's max depth, you need to position the boat not farther away than 40 ft from the target, and you need to cast 60 ft beyond it to get it to 17 ft. Most guys don't realize that

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when using baitcasters,i see guys on tv really whipping their rods and casting almost so hard i would have a huge birdnest.How do you guys usually set brakes and tension.I usually try to use least amount of each as possible and use a softer cast.i know how to adjust them by letting the lure fall slowly but that usually seems to be alittle too lite for me

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when using baitcasters,i see guys on tv really whipping their rods and casting almost so hard i would have a huge birdnest.How do you guys usually set brakes and tension.I usually try to use least amount of each as possible and use a softer cast.i know how to adjust them by letting the lure fall slowly but that usually seems to be alittle too lite for me

Every reel is different. Start with the tension tight enough to keep the bait from falling at all without a vigorous shake of the rod tip. Max out your brake and adjust backward until you get the best combination for your casting style. Just takes practice and familiarity with your equipment. I'm not much for the 'educated thumb' theory. I'm not that coordinated, so I try to rely on the reel's adjustments to keep things smooth.

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i'll try that out tomorrow,hopefully it will be first day on the water this year.....just wondering if alot of people tighten them down and really whip it or keep it on the lower settings and just down throw as hard.....i know i don't cast 70 yds!!!!!!,thats for sure....

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I keep mine as loose as possible, just to where the spool has no side to side movement, and 2 out of 6 centrifugal brakes on using a Shimano Citica, and more recently a Curado at the same settings also. I whip it pretty good at those settings too. I'm not sure how far I'm throwing using those reels. I know I can beat 80 feet on most things using the Citica on a 6'6" M/F rod due to back yard testing. That's nowhere near 70 yards though. Maybe I'm over thumbing it?? I used the Citica last year for about 5 trips at those settings with no trouble. I've only fished the Curado one time but had no trouble with it either (other than two monster backlashes hours apart that were my fault completely due to....um....forgetting to thumb?? LOL)

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I have several reels that I can cast a 1/2ounce rattle trap about 60yds if I had to guess. But I can whip that sucker out there, but my settings are actually set to where i can let go of the spool and switch hands while the lure is in the air (when I am casting and reeling with right hand). Thats with a 7ft rod and 12lb test line. The rod is able to load up well and the reel is set good for that type of bait and cast. Most of my reels are dialed in to where I can do this though. That is just what works for me. I could probably get some extra distance if I used even less brake, but in very few instances am I even able to set the hook that far out.

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I can cast all the way down to a bass’s mouth ;)

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I o a lot of shore-bound fishing, so I strive for distance casting. After putting Quantum Hot Sauce on my reels, I'm able to get an extra 40ish% distance from them. My AG Orra SX will spit out around 120 feet of line on a 6'6M rod ( 1/2 oz spinner). Hot Sauce really does make a big difference.

Rooster: Where in Kentucky are you from? I'm in Flatwoods myself.

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I o a lot of shore-bound fishing, so I strive for distance casting. After putting Quantum Hot Sauce on my reels, I'm able to get an extra 40ish% distance from them. My AG Orra SX will spit out around 120 feet of line on a 6'6M rod ( 1/2 oz spinner). Hot Sauce really does make a big difference.

Rooster: Where in Kentucky are you from? I'm in Flatwoods myself.

I have a lot of family in Flatwoods Kentucky.

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I have a lot of family in Flatwoods Kentucky.

I noticed your last name is Crisp. Your family wouldn't happen to own the Crisp's restaurants around here, would they?

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I generally keep one brake on my curados and my tension knob set loosely.  If I press the thumb bar, the lure drops instantly and will hit the ground 5 feet blow in about 2 seconds.  When I cast I dont "whip" it, I make sure its a slow and smooth cast, let the weight of the lure load the rod, and use my thumb to monitor the spool.  Once you do it a while you can feel when the line is backing up (birds nest) and can adjust your thumb in mid cast to account for it.  Like mentioned above, it just takes familiarity with your equipment.

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70yd casts are just unreal.  I'm not doubting the number its just crazy.  The baits i feel i can throw a mile i MAY get 40-45yds.  and i'm talkin a spook jr, or a 7" stiko worm weightless.  i mostly fish a lot of cover so distance is not a huge concern.  And like someone said, getting hooked up 70yds away is a LONG way for somethin to happen. 

 

Matt

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I don't know how much line a full reel of 65# braid equals but I can spool a lews no problem depending on what I'm throwing. I use 1 brake and usually no mags on all my reels. Just maybe a little thumb at the start of the cast and I usually never have to touch it again until it hits the water. The rod makes a big difference on casting difference to me.

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