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Would you do it? I'm considering crabbing next year after I graduate. Spend a couple seasons out at sea and come back with a healthy amount of cash to jump start my life and join the VSP. It's a pretty sweet deal aside from all the labor and hazards. ( obviously it comes with the job ) I already am in contact with someone from Homer, AK that can get me on a boat.

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Fishing Rhino would be the person in the know, he was a commercial lobster fisherman.

I see commercial fisherman each and everyday here in Florida, I know it's vastly different from crab fishing in Alaska. Danger aside, some of the fishermen here barely eek out a living, others that I have personal met live in some very expensive homes, one of them lives next door to my daughter on the intracoastal. These fishermen are out when the fish are running, 7 days a week, way less if the fish aren't around, feast or famine.

On a side note, I knew a fellow many years ago, an electrician by trade, joined the merchant marine on the Gr Lakes, several years later he gave it up after he amassing quite a bankroll, it was far less dangerous work too.

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I get off on the danger I guess, the feel of adrenaline keeps me in the game.

Lobsters huh? Where at? Southeast coast?

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Would you do it?

No. But I'm a big believer in people following their dreams. You know in advance about the risks and rewards, so go for it if it means not doing it is going to eat away at you.

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All I know is this. I wouldn't do it. It's not just the danger. I've had a friend setting out a trawl in his boat and got caught in the line, and taken over the side. His body was never recovered.

Any fishing is dangerous, though not on the same level as the crabbing on the Bering Sea.

It's the grind, the mind numbing, relentless grind in all kinds of weather. You've got to be physically able to do the job, but even more important is the mental side of it. You've got to be able to push through physical pain, exhaustion, and knowing that you've still got days or weeks of fishing ahead of you. If you find out it's not for you a few days into the trip there's no escape, no way out, and no mercy or compassion from the rest of the crew. You are stuck at sea until the boat gets to port to offload their catch.

You will be alone, among a crew that has to pick up your slack. What you see on television, and what you'll experience are two entirely different things. It's interesting, even fascinating to watch green water sweep over the side. On the boat, it's downright terrifying.

Hey, you may love it. Most who try it think they will. They see a crewman making forty or fifty thousand dollars for a few weeks work. Those few weeks can seem like an eternity when you are at sea. The boats featured on the show are for the most part successful ventures. Other boats may barely scratch out a living.

I've had guests make a day trip with us on the lobsterboat. Some say they had a good time, but they wouldn't want to have to do it for a living.

Some dream of the freedom of the sea. The reality is more like the boat is a prison. Those hundred plus foot boats get mighty small when nature throws them a fastball of strong winds.

I'm not saying these things to discourage you. If you do it, I wish you success. I hope to fill out the image of what you have seen with the downside of the job.

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Not a chance. I couldn't stand being on a boat that long and going that long without sleep like they do. The money would be nice, if you catch a bunch of crabs. Or you might go out on a boat, freeze your arse off, go through sleep deprivation, just to waste a few months of your life looking for crabs that you never find.

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Or you might go out on a boat, freeze your arse off, go through sleep deprivation, just to waste a few months of your life looking for crabs that you never find.

This, plus what Rhino had to say should be considerations. If it all possible before packing up and going a few thousand miles, find out what you can about this boat your friend can get you on. Things like how long they've been crabbing and how much of their crew is returning might give you some insight.

One other thing, I have heard from a few different people that the drug abuse rate among commercial fisherman and in the fishing villages is high. Point is, there will be lots of pitfalls to avoid to return with a check at all.

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Looks like a fine career for a high school dropout or ex-con, but I'd have to think there are better options for someone with a diploma or degree.

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This, plus what Rhino had to say should be considerations. If it all possible before packing up and going a few thousand miles, find out what you can about this boat your friend can get you on. Things like how long they've been crabbing and how much of their crew is returning might give you some insight.

One other thing, I have heard from a few different people that the drug abuse rate among commercial fisherman and in the fishing villages is high. Point is, there will be lots of pitfalls to avoid to return with a check at all.

trust me I know man, thanks!

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I did a season crabbing in Alaska when I had a girlfriend that lived there at the time. Was decent money. I don't think I'd want to make a career out of it though. Risk just isn't worth the reward IMO. I will say this, it was definitely an interesting experience.

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I did a season crabbing in Alaska when I had a girlfriend that lived there at the time. Was decent money. I don't think I'd want to make a career out of it though. Risk just isn't worth the reward IMO. I will say this, it was definitely an interesting experience.

what was your role? Deckhand? If so did you throw the hook? Or were a crab sorter. I want to bait pots.

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20 years ago maybe. Today, probably not. My body is messed up from being in the trades. I could imagine how messed up my body would be working on a crab boat.

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Sounds great to me...Go for it!

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trust me I know man, thanks!

FWIW when I was 18 I would have jumped at it. The experience and chance at a big paycheck would have been all I cared about.

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what was your role? Deckhand? If so did you throw the hook? Or were a crab sorter. I want to bait pots.

Deckhand. I learned what grinding bait, filling bags, and baiting pots was all about. It is miserable back breaking work. I did it right after I got off of active duty, I was in d**n good shape at the time. Plus, being the low man on the totem pole gets you all kinds of other "fun" tasks to do......

Toilets get clogged often.....

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Deckhand. I learned what grinding bait, filling bags, and baiting pots was all about. It is miserable back breaking work. I did it right after I got off of active duty, I was in d**n good shape at the time. Plus, being the low man on the totem pole gets you all kinds of other "fun" tasks to do......

Toilets get clogged often.....

aha! Should be a good experience for me.

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Woo! My uncle hooked me up with a Scallop Dredging boat in Gloucester for next year!

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All I know is this. I wouldn't do it. It's not just the danger. I've had a friend setting out a trawl in his boat and got caught in the line, and taken over the side. His body was never recovered.

Any fishing is dangerous, though not on the same level as the crabbing on the Bering Sea.

It's the grind, the mind numbing, relentless grind in all kinds of weather. You've got to be physically able to do the job, but even more important is the mental side of it. You've got to be able to push through physical pain, exhaustion, and knowing that you've still got days or weeks of fishing ahead of you. If you find out it's not for you a few days into the trip there's no escape, no way out, and no mercy or compassion from the rest of the crew. You are stuck at sea until the boat gets to port to offload their catch.

You will be alone, among a crew that has to pick up your slack. What you see on television, and what you'll experience are two entirely different things. It's interesting, even fascinating to watch green water sweep over the side. On the boat, it's downright terrifying.

Hey, you may love it. Most who try it think they will. They see a crewman making forty or fifty thousand dollars for a few weeks work. Those few weeks can seem like an eternity when you are at sea. The boats featured on the show are for the most part successful ventures. Other boats may barely scratch out a living.

I've had guests make a day trip with us on the lobsterboat. Some say they had a good time, but they wouldn't want to have to do it for a living.

Some dream of the freedom of the sea. The reality is more like the boat is a prison. Those hundred plus foot boats get mighty small when nature throws them a fastball of strong winds.

I'm not saying these things to discourage you. If you do it, I wish you success. I hope to fill out the image of what you have seen with the downside of the job.

Exactly how I feel. I think I could handle the danger aspect of it, just not the intense work schedule. If it's anything like they make it out to be on deadliest catch, it's not for me. Not trying to sound lazy, but that is just overboard.

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