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Scorcher214

Any Boiler Makers Here?

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I have a good chance at getting into boiler making. My uncle is a highly respected guy in the trade and is willing to put in a good word for me. Which is strange because he never does things like this for people. Makes me feel really good :). Getting into a lifelong career at the age of 19 would be just amazing. And from what I've learned, the pay is pretty sweet even as just an apprentice. All I know about this job is that it involves a lot of welding. I've always loved building things with my hands, and always looked at jobs where I would be making or building something. I would hate to be working in an office cubicle (no offense to those who do :D). So are there any boiler makers here that could maybe give me an idea on what to expect?

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Nope just us RATS! LOL

Seriously if you get a chance to get a good job with a reputable company don't screw it up 1000 people will be ready to cut your throat for it in a minute! Show up on time do your job GOOD (It's Union you won't be rushed) and don't make any waves. And PRAY you don't get laid off.

I was a Carpenter for JE Dunn and Loved it! Work dried up and I started my own company.

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Hot, dirty, filthy work. However it is a lot of fun. Pays great. I think you will really enjoy it. My buddy the boiler maker seems to enjoy the heck out of it. Always starts his stories with, "in the boiler" or "when your in the boiler".

Anyway, let me hit up two of my buddies and see what I can dig up for ya.

Also, it may be preemptive but, Welcome to the Trades!

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The trades are physically demanding. Hard work and no work. Joining the union, my advice to you, buy coffee and donuts, listen, and do what you're told. Ask questions but don't question those you ask. Union training is the best training you can get. Make contacts and don't burn bridges. That being said, you can write your own future by being better than everyone else. I'm a union pipefitter and have never been unemployed (knock on wood). Learn all you can. Good or bad, your reputation will follow you.

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The trades are physically demanding. Hard work and no work. Joining the union, my advice to you, buy coffee and donuts, listen, and do what you're told. Ask questions but don't question those you ask. Union training is the best training you can get. Make contacts and don't burn bridges. That being said, you can write your own future by being better than everyone else. I'm a union pipefitter and have never been unemployed (knock on wood). Learn all you can. Good or bad, your reputation will follow you.

I thought you did HVAC? Kinda crossing the trades aren't ya? I know them pipe fighters do contract out to refrigeration companies but still. Your either a pipe fighter or a metal knocker ya can't be both. Otherwise your a mill wright.

Regards,

The Rod Burning Sparky

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I thought you did HVAC? Kinda crossing the trades aren't ya? I know them pipe fighters do contract out to refrigeration companies but still. Your either a pipe fighter or a metal knocker ya can't be both. Otherwise your a mill wright.

Regards,

The Rod Burning Sparky

Local 597 has a service division of which I am a journeyman "servicefitter" Pipefitters, Steamfitters, and Tin Knockers cover most of the hvac/r trade. Stationary Engineers dabble in it a bit. As far as Millwrights, I worked a construction job with a few guys from Philly who travel the country building stuff. They built a blast freezer with conveyors for a customer of ours that makes school lunches. We installed the piping and refrigeration units. Real tough gig that pays a TON of money.

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Local 597 has a service division of which I am a journeyman "servicefitter" Pipefitters, Steamfitters, and Tin Knockers cover most of the hvac/r trade. Stationary Engineers dabble in it a bit. As far as Millwrights, I worked a construction job with a few guys from Philly who travel the country building stuff. They built a blast freezer with conveyors for a customer of ours that makes school lunches. We installed the piping and refrigeration units. Real tough gig that pays a TON of money.

The company I'm with now just hired me on as a journeyman electrician/millwright. Pays good as all get out. Plus a bunch of the jobs we do pay government scale which makes the pay that much sweeter. Personally though I'm just happy to be doing non-service work again. I spent the last year doing parking lot lights and signs. I learned a bunch about lighting, the work was just boring to me though.

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