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Updated: 4/14 Need Help Buying A Used Bass Boat Off Cl

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I am going through craigslist and I am looking through different boats and have found a couple that I would like for you guys to review. I do not want to spend more than $2500 would like to spend closer to $1500 or $2000 tops. I figure this is a good time to try and get a really good deal.

My purposes are for small lake bass fishing. Could you please look at the following two boats and tell me if they are worth the money and what I should offer? Considering the time of year here...it is a good time to buy one because most people are not looking forward to having to store theirs all winter so they are going relatively cheap.

Boat #1 http://lansing.craigslist.org/boa/3332852871.html

This boat has a motor that the guy says is not working properly but he is "sure that it is a small problem". Also, the tongue on the trailer is bent and there is not a cover for it. The work that is done on it looks all custom and he will include the trolling motor that can be seen. I do not think it is worth $2500, but at what price would this boat be considered a good deal?

Boat #2 http://lansing.craigslist.org/boa/3272316051.html

Everything on this boat seems to work, it has many more features and a cover. Nothing is wrong with the trailer or boat according to the guy selling. He said he is firm on $2500. What do you guys think?

Thank you for all of your help!

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These two boats are very hard to compare as they are very different.

Boat number one is going to be less comfy to fish from, obviously much slower and limited to small water, but easier to launch and cheaper on gas. However, the motor is a major concern and i wouldn't touch it without the advice of a well-respected mechanic. Most of the value is in that motor so this should be your main concern.

Boat number 2 is going to be faster, more comfy to fish from, access to big waters, and can be used to fish with multiple people or in a tourney. However, there is going to be more secondary cost due to a lot more gas consumption and more expensive motor repairs if a problem arises (again, have a mechanic give it a full sweep). From appearance, this boat could also use a new trolling motor. If everything passes inspection, the asking price is pretty fair (i would offer 2k cash).

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Because of the trailer tongue I wouldn't touch #1. #2 would be my choice after some due diligence on motor and transom condition.

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Boat #1 without a working motor and damaged trailer is worth less than a grand. Boat #2, I agree with NBR. Have a shop take a look at the motor and structural integrity of the vessel.

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Trailer tongue is a $35 part. The first boat is wildly over priced. In working condition, they go for $800 - 1200. The second boat might be a decent deal, but something that old scares me. Have a good boat mechanic do a full inspection.

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I agree here too.

Boat #1 I would not even enquire about, even if there were no issues, if you have ever fished from a V-hull you would not care for it as much after fishing from a platform flat bottom or even a glasser, but that is just my honest opinion, no matter the shape of everything, good or bad, not saying they are bad to have, just the one my daughter has is a 14' king fisher V-hull and after spending some time in that one, wide flat bottoms are the way to go, at least for me, the wider the better, so if you are thinking about aluminum boats, I would suggest looking into wide flat bottom boats, one other thing I noticed is there is no drain that I can see in the boat for water to drain into the hull area, a drain and a builge pump would have to be installed, I see no access to the hull to bail water should there need be.

Boat #2 I would say it looks to be taken care of but pictures do not do boats any justice, nothing beats looking at them in person, if the waters you plan on fishing allow good use of a glasser then I would have to think about this one as a possibility, especially if you are planning on expanding your water usage to larger bodies of water, one thing to keep in mind is the cost of owning a glasser, maintaining a glasser is a little more costly than a wide flat bottom, things like taxes etc... may have to be a factor as well, but the glasser is much more stable under conditions the flat bottom would be questionable in.

No matter what you decide make sure you have a reputable shop look everything over for you and also make sure you have the owner take you for a ride, don't buy it if the owner declines you for one or both, if at all possible fish from the boat for a few hours, that will most definately help you with a decision.

Good luck and be safe !!!

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being a small water fisherman (a lake in my state is probably a pond in yours) i look for a few things in a boat. i have been searching craigslist as well for stuff and have narrowed down my decisions on whats important. ease of launching on a small lake (<40 acres), stability, agility, and strength. I'm not out there trying to go 65+mph across the lake. my choice of motor size would be no greater than 60 probably. also, most of the lakes i fish are either shallow and rocky, or shallow and full of stumps. because of this, fiberglass isnt really an option for me. since im not fishing big lakes, maneuverability is also important. anything over around 17 feet it kind of unwieldy around here. so basically what im saying is take into consideration the waters you plan to fish, and your needs. for me the ideal boat is a 17 foot aluminum mod-v with a 40 horse on the back. for you, it may be very different

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These two boats are very hard to compare as they are very different.

Boat number one is going to be less comfy to fish from, obviously much slower and limited to small water, but easier to launch and cheaper on gas. However, the motor is a major concern and i wouldn't touch it without the advice of a well-respected mechanic. Most of the value is in that motor so this should be your main concern.

Boat number 2 is going to be faster, more comfy to fish from, access to big waters, and can be used to fish with multiple people or in a tourney. However, there is going to be more secondary cost due to a lot more gas consumption and more expensive motor repairs if a problem arises (again, have a mechanic give it a full sweep). From appearance, this boat could also use a new trolling motor. If everything passes inspection, the asking price is pretty fair (i would offer 2k cash).

Comment #1: That was what I was thinking. The guy saying "He's not a mechanic, but is sure it is an easy fix is troubling" I put it on the list due to reasons I will list at the end. I appreciate your evaluation of the comfort aspect. I have a girlfriend that I fish with and she appreciates being to chill while I fish.

Comment#2: The secondary costs are what is the major concern for me. From talking to the guy. He said everything is in perfect working order. I am not an expert on boat prices or what one should get for a certain amount of money, but it seemed like a decent deal since he said everything was working and obviously there is the asking price and the actual price. How fast it goes, is not a huge deal to me. Being able to keep it for a while and possibly upgrade to tourneys in the future is. I don't want something that is going to be a hassle. My mechanical knowledge of boats is very novice.

I agree here too.

Boat #1 I would not even enquire about, even if there were no issues, if you have ever fished from a V-hull you would not care for it as much after fishing from a platform flat bottom or even a glasser, but that is just my honest opinion, no matter the shape of everything, good or bad, not saying they are bad to have, just the one my daughter has is a 14' king fisher V-hull and after spending some time in that one, wide flat bottoms are the way to go, at least for me, the wider the better, so if you are thinking about aluminum boats, I would suggest looking into wide flat bottom boats, one other thing I noticed is there is no drain that I can see in the boat for water to drain into the hull area, a drain and a builge pump would have to be installed, I see no access to the hull to bail water should there need be.

Boat #2 I would say it looks to be taken care of but pictures do not do boats any justice, nothing beats looking at them in person, if the waters you plan on fishing allow good use of a glasser then I would have to think about this one as a possibility, especially if you are planning on expanding your water usage to larger bodies of water, one thing to keep in mind is the cost of owning a glasser, maintaining a glasser is a little more costly than a wide flat bottom, things like taxes etc... may have to be a factor as well, but the glasser is much more stable under conditions the flat bottom would be questionable in.

No matter what you decide make sure you have a reputable shop look everything over for you and also make sure you have the owner take you for a ride, don't buy it if the owner declines you for one or both, if at all possible fish from the boat for a few hours, that will most definately help you with a decision.

Good luck and be safe !!!

Comment #1: Thank you for your comments as well about comfortability and needing a bilge! Yeah, I told the guy he was asking way too much. I inquired about it for reasons I'll post at the end. Thank you for pointing out the issues. Did not notice the ones you mentioned. It looked like it could be comfortable because of the decks and such and I could stand up and flip into places, but seemingly not so.

Comment #2: I do know a good mechanic who could look at it. Although he knows a lot about "Cars" and older motors, he is not a specialist in boat motors. I do not know how different the two motor types are. The guy is claiming flawlessness in every gauge and in both the big motor and the trolling motor. He states the price is "Firm". Being the time of year it is here, I feel it is more of a buyers market which is why I am looking right now.

being a small water fisherman (a lake in my state is probably a pond in yours) i look for a few things in a boat. i have been searching craigslist as well for stuff and have narrowed down my decisions on whats important. ease of launching on a small lake (<40 acres), stability, agility, and strength. I'm not out there trying to go 65+mph across the lake. my choice of motor size would be no greater than 60 probably. also, most of the lakes i fish are either shallow and rocky, or shallow and full of stumps. because of this, fiberglass isnt really an option for me. since im not fishing big lakes, maneuverability is also important. anything over around 17 feet it kind of unwieldy around here. so basically what im saying is take into consideration the waters you plan to fish, and your needs. for me the ideal boat is a 17 foot aluminum mod-v with a 40 horse on the back. for you, it may be very different

I would say the average lake I fish are around 100 acres. I have not had the chance to fish lakes like you have mentioned where worrying about stumps, rocky bottoms etc. is a huge concern. That being said, we have ideas in common. At the time my main thing I am looking to do is a get a boat that I can fish for bass and fish reasonably well. Let this be known, I've been mainly fishing from a pontoon boat or a kayak and paddle boat. My main concern is having something comfortable and in my price range that I can troll around in and fish docks, cover, etc. Seeing that #2 was even in my price range was great. All of those additions (speed, body style, etc.) are added bonuses and if that is what I can get for my money. I would be happy. The lakes I fish are not very tough. I won't be taking it out to lake michigan mainly 100 acre lakes give or take. But I want to find new lakes to fish, so the flexibility in a bigger boat would be nice.

Thats easy... Boat #1 in my eyes isnt even a bass boat. Plus that price is not even in the parking lot of the ball park. Id pick boat #2 probably. OR id go make this guy an offer.

http://centralmich.c...3319022495.html

Thanks for your inquiry Bruno. Let me try to explain my situation a little better so you can better understand where I am coming from. I do not have a lot of money to put into this investment. I said $2500 as being the absolute max. This needs to include the taxes I have to pay, and any fixes or additions to the boat in particular that I will have to do. I would like to get on the water more. I only get to fish half the weekends in a month and that is because I do not have a boat of my own. I am using friends/families equipment.

If I could do it right and get something impressive I certainly would. At this point, I am a college student who is fishing as a hobby. I do not make money from fishing I do it as tradition passed down to me from my family and I simply enjoy it. I feel I would enjoy it much more if I made an investment and got something that would allow me to troll around and find proper fish holding environments, meanwhile being able to be much more suitable than a kayak etc. Gas money I am not particularly worried about, I do not plan to go flying around in the boat just for fun, my main goal is fishing. A 100 horsepower motor eats gas regardless and so does hauling the boat I understand that, but I can make adjustments there. Having to buy a new motor, having to fix a broken trailer are the types of events that are very problematic.

That being said I will try to make this clearer. $2500 is the absolute max I can put into this. I put boat #1 and #2 up because they each had nice casting platforms and I feel I could utilizing the trolling motor to troll around in. Plus they are examples of two different styles that I have seen come up from my searches. I mentioned boat #1 not in equivalent comparison to boat #2. The second boat is much nicer and much more capable. Also, it is more expensive. I figure if I could get boat #1 for really cheap this may be the way I want to go (or a similar boat). Also, if I could get boat #2 without it being ridiculously expensive then I would be gracious to have a boat like that. The boat you listed Bruno from Central Michigan does look like a nice boat. It is listed at $3500, that means if he has trouble selling it he may entertain a much lower offer if he needs it gone. The time of year here in michigan is not great if your a looking to sell a boat. The lakes water levels are dropping and people are beginning to think about storing these boats. I have the ability to store and pull, I just need the right boat.

Thank you all and I look forward to hearing your comments and recommendations with the added insight that was given. I appreciate everyone's input and the time given to help. Thank you.

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I hear ya man. I recently bought a 1989 Ranger. He was asking $3500... I got it for $2500... Maybe that guy needs to buy pampers and enfamil. The guy i bought mine from did LOL. Id try to talk the guy on boat #2 down. The guy selling boat #1 is living in a dream world trying to sell that for that price.

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I hear ya man. I recently bought a 1989 Ranger. He was asking $3500... I got it for $2500... Maybe that guy needs to buy pampers and enfamil. The guy i bought mine from did LOL. Id try to talk the guy on boat #2 down. The guy selling boat #1 is living in a dream world trying to sell that for that price.

I agree lol. That's interesting with the pamper's. Don't think I wanna get into that discussion. I'll make an offer on boat #2 and see what he says, if he entertains I'll go down there and look at it myself with my "mechanic" friend. I wish I had a more reliable motor expert, but that's all I got.

What are the main questions I should be asking the guy who is selling boat #2. And what should I be looking at specifically to tell the integrity of the ride. Also, boat #2 does not have a trailer title, what does that mean?

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A couple of words of advise. As a minimun, DO A COMPRESSION CHECK ON THE MOTOR!!! there should be no more than five pounds difference between the four cylinders.

Take a couple of 3/4" wrenches and try to tighten the bolts holding the motor on the boat. If they tighten and pull start pulling down into the transome, walk away from it.

Get in it and walk around on the floor, if it's soft and gives way in places, again, walk away

Take a large screw driver and take the bottom plug out of the lower unit, let and little oil drain an make sure it's black and no drops of water come out first.

Turn the steering wheel from stop to stop and make sure it turns easily. Steering cables are expensive and a pain to replace

Take it to the lake and test drive it. No test drive, no buy.

If you buy it, replace the water pump impeller and change the lube in the lower unit, and pack the wheel bearing on the trailer the very first thing

On boat #1, see how much the guy is willing to pay you to dispose of it for him. You couldn't give me that piece of crap.

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Comment #1: Thank you for your comments as well about comfortability and needing a bilge! Yeah, I told the guy he was asking way too much. I inquired about it for reasons I'll post at the end. Thank you for pointing out the issues. Did not notice the ones you mentioned. It looked like it could be comfortable because of the decks and such and I could stand up and flip into places, but seemingly not so.

Comment #2: I do know a good mechanic who could look at it. Although he knows a lot about "Cars" and older motors, he is not a specialist in boat motors. I do not know how different the two motor types are. The guy is claiming flawlessness in every gauge and in both the big motor and the trolling motor. He states the price is "Firm". Being the time of year it is here, I feel it is more of a buyers market which is why I am looking right now.

I have been an automotive tech for 39 years, his opinion is better than none at all, take what he has to say under great consideration, all he has to keep in mind is that this is a giant weedeater, it's still a 2 stroke engine no mater how you look at it, boat engines are not all that different than car/truck engines, they still need air fuel and spark to run, the electronics on the other hand is where some get confused, make sure the amount of corrosion he see's is not accessive in areas, some will be normal, check around the master panel, console areas and guages, batteries as well along with areas under the engine cover.

Steering, look for accessive play up and down left and right on the colum itself, as you start to turn the wheel, note the amount of free travel before the engine assembly starts to move in one direction or the other, a small amount is normal, make sure it turns free as well, have your friend hold a small amount of pressure on the engine assy as you rotate the steering wheel left and right, if the steering binds or becomes very difficult to turn there is a issue in the steering.

One of the most important things you need to check is the transom, as stated above in BKeith's post, just drawing on the bolts will tell you a lot about the shape the trasnsom is in, one more check that will help aid in this is to push down on the bottom of the trans assy while the engine/trans assy is at a 45 degree angle , if the transom does not move or the engine assy does not move then the transom should be ok, small movement in the engine/trans assy may be noticed while you are performing this check, it could be from a small amount of play in the bushings on the engine mount bracket that is mounted on the transom, this is normal, regaurdless the transom should not move.

Lay down under the boat and look at the hull, there should be no damage, any repairs that are obvious could be a major concern while on the water.

BKeith's post above is a very good post, do everything he has suggested if you are going to consider this glasser, as for the price he is asking, IF everything is as he says it is and all of the checks are made and pass, the price seems fair to me, but your not done until he takes you out in the boat, drive it before you buy it, fish a cove or two with it and see if you are comfortable on the front of the boat.

It's not the only boat that will be on the market, be open minded and take your time, you want your first boat to be as hassel free as possible, this one at least looks like it may have potential.

Good luck and be safe !!!

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A couple of words of advise. As a minimun, DO A COMPRESSION CHECK ON THE MOTOR!!! there should be no more than five pounds difference between the four cylinders.

Take a couple of 3/4" wrenches and try to tighten the bolts holding the motor on the boat. If they tighten and pull start pulling down into the transome, walk away from it.

Get in it and walk around on the floor, if it's soft and gives way in places, again, walk away

Take a large screw driver and take the bottom plug out of the lower unit, let and little oil drain an make sure it's black and no drops of water come out first.

Turn the steering wheel from stop to stop and make sure it turns easily. Steering cables are expensive and a pain to replace

Take it to the lake and test drive it. No test drive, no buy.

If you buy it, replace the water pump impeller and change the lube in the lower unit, and pack the wheel bearing on the trailer the very first thing

On boat #1, see how much the guy is willing to pay you to dispose of it for him. You couldn't give me that piece of crap.

Thank you for your comments. These are all things that I would not have checked and/or things that I do not believe my mechanic would have looked for specifically. I really appreciate you taking the time to go over the details with me, it is much appreciated. I see the issues that could come about from the failing of these tests.

Could you explain what exactly this process is and accomplishes? "If you buy it, replace the water pump impeller and change the lube in the lower unit, and pack the wheel bearing on the trailer the very first thing"

By changing the lube do you mean giving it an oil change? What is the water pump impeller? What is packing the wheel bearing on a trailer? What exactly should I look for to know the integrity of the trailer is there?

Comment #1: Thank you for your comments as well about comfortability and needing a bilge! Yeah, I told the guy he was asking way too much. I inquired about it for reasons I'll post at the end. Thank you for pointing out the issues. Did not notice the ones you mentioned. It looked like it could be comfortable because of the decks and such and I could stand up and flip into places, but seemingly not so.

Comment #2: I do know a good mechanic who could look at it. Although he knows a lot about "Cars" and older motors, he is not a specialist in boat motors. I do not know how different the two motor types are. The guy is claiming flawlessness in every gauge and in both the big motor and the trolling motor. He states the price is "Firm". Being the time of year it is here, I feel it is more of a buyers market which is why I am looking right now.

I have been an automotive tech for 39 years, his opinion is better than none at all, take what he has to say under great consideration, all he has to keep in mind is that this is a giant weedeater, it's still a 2 stroke engine no mater how you look at it, boat engines are not all that different than car/truck engines, they still need air fuel and spark to run, the electronics on the other hand is where some get confused, make sure the amount of corrosion he see's is not accessive in areas, some will be normal, check around the master panel, console areas and guages, batteries as well along with areas under the engine cover.

Steering, look for accessive play up and down left and right on the colum itself, as you start to turn the wheel, note the amount of free travel before the engine assembly starts to move in one direction or the other, a small amount is normal, make sure it turns free as well, have your friend hold a small amount of pressure on the engine assy as you rotate the steering wheel left and right, if the steering binds or becomes very difficult to turn there is a issue in the steering.

One of the most important things you need to check is the transom, as stated above in BKeith's post, just drawing on the bolts will tell you a lot about the shape the trasnsom is in, one more check that will help aid in this is to push down on the bottom of the trans assy while the engine/trans assy is at a 45 degree angle , if the transom does not move or the engine assy does not move then the transom should be ok, small movement in the engine/trans assy may be noticed while you are performing this check, it could be from a small amount of play in the bushings on the engine mount bracket that is mounted on the transom, this is normal, regaurdless the transom should not move.

Lay down under the boat and look at the hull, there should be no damage, any repairs that are obvious could be a major concern while on the water.

BKeith's post above is a very good post, do everything he has suggested if you are going to consider this glasser, as for the price he is asking, IF everything is as he says it is and all of the checks are made and pass, the price seems fair to me, but your not done until he takes you out in the boat, drive it before you buy it, fish a cove or two with it and see if you are comfortable on the front of the boat.

It's not the only boat that will be on the market, be open minded and take your time, you want your first boat to be as hassel free as possible, this one at least looks like it may have potential.

Good luck and be safe !!!

Your last statement I completely agree with you. I should not be in a hurry that is where mistakes are made. I have seen this happen many times with people buying cars.

In regards to your descriptive details as for what to look for your. You and Keith did an excellent job describing what I need to do. I will pass all this information along to my mechanic. Although I am not familiar with all the terms you guys used, a quick diagram search will surely clear those issues.

To basically summarize what I feel you guys are making sure I check.

1.) I do not know how to do a compression check, but I feel that basically has to do with the fluidity of how the motor runs. I feel confident that my mechanic will be able to diagnose the motor pretty well.

2.) The boat specific parts where you guys are talking about the 'transom' and is new terminology to me. Is the process of checking those bolts, basically a way of making sure the motor is securely attached to the boat. If it did give, does that speak to problems with the motor, or the frame that holds the motor? Basically Should I just be checking to make sure there is no play in the motor at all during all operations? Such as the 45 degree angle trans pressure, and the tightening of the bolts?

3.) Walking around the boat makes sense, soft spots speak to rotted out/broken materials. As well as checking he integrity of the hull. How noticeable would fixes to the hull be?

4.) As far as the steering, basically as I steer left and right, it should move with consistent pressure each direction without any stoppage until it reaches its max turn?

5.) Should I ask the guy to basically take me out for a ride on the lake with it? I am not sure I will be able to do this, due to geographical concerns. Is it a terrible decision to buy a boat without test driving it on the water first? Or can one judge integrity from starting the engine on land and judging based off of those conditions?

My last questions surrounds if I do encounter any of these issues? Should any failure of any of these tests immediately result in a search for a different boat?

Do you guys feel with my mechanical knowledge that a glasser would be the best fit for the situation I am in? The idea of having one sounds like a dream to fish in, but it could also turn into a nightmare potentially. If all the checks pass, am I likely to be receiving a boat that will not cause many problems? (I am going off of probability here, obviously there isn't certainty)

Thank you guys very much! I was not going to do any of these checks before buying, WOW

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What do you guys think about this boat? http://cgi.ebay.com/...9#ht_2144wt_754

It does not have a motor, but seems like I could maybe put a cheap one in. Why would a boat not have a motor? That is confusing. If I could get that for ~$2500 it seems like it has future potential and value. What do you think?

And this one http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/16-1990-Procraft-w-trailer-60HP-Mariner-Minkota-elec-motor-2-fishfind-MORE-/271081553777?pt=Fishing_Boats&hash=item3f1db83f71#ht_500wt_1182

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Repowering that boat will not be cheap. The hull does look pretty clean. Personally, I'd get something turnkey.

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What do you guys think about this boat? http://cgi.ebay.com/...9#ht_2144wt_754

It does not have a motor, but seems like I could maybe put a cheap one in. Why would a boat not have a motor? That is confusing. If I could get that for ~$2500 it seems like it has future potential and value. What do you think?

And this one http://cgi.ebay.com/...1#ht_500wt_1182

First boat will cost you more to put a decent motor and controls on it. Probably a minimum 150hp. Probably cost more than the boat. 2nd one looks decent. Make sure you have the motor/hull checked out. If everything is in working order, that's less money you will have to spend to fix it up.

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Thank you for your comments. These are all things that I would not have checked and/or things that I do not believe my mechanic would have looked for specifically. I really appreciate you taking the time to go over the details with me, it is much appreciated. I see the issues that could come about from the failing of these tests.

Could you explain what exactly this process is and accomplishes? "If you buy it, replace the water pump impeller and change the lube in the lower unit, and pack the wheel bearing on the trailer the very first thing"

By changing the lube do you mean giving it an oil change? What is the water pump impeller? What is packing the wheel bearing on a trailer? What exactly should I look for to know the integrity of the trailer is there?

Your last statement I completely agree with you. I should not be in a hurry that is where mistakes are made. I have seen this happen many times with people buying cars.

In regards to your descriptive details as for what to look for your. You and Keith did an excellent job describing what I need to do. I will pass all this information along to my mechanic. Although I am not familiar with all the terms you guys used, a quick diagram search will surely clear those issues.

To basically summarize what I feel you guys are making sure I check.

1.) I do not know how to do a compression check, but I feel that basically has to do with the fluidity of how the motor runs. I feel confident that my mechanic will be able to diagnose the motor pretty well.

2.) The boat specific parts where you guys are talking about the 'transom' and is new terminology to me. Is the process of checking those bolts, basically a way of making sure the motor is securely attached to the boat. If it did give, does that speak to problems with the motor, or the frame that holds the motor? Basically Should I just be checking to make sure there is no play in the motor at all during all operations? Such as the 45 degree angle trans pressure, and the tightening of the bolts?

3.) Walking around the boat makes sense, soft spots speak to rotted out/broken materials. As well as checking he integrity of the hull. How noticeable would fixes to the hull be?

4.) As far as the steering, basically as I steer left and right, it should move with consistent pressure each direction without any stoppage until it reaches its max turn?

5.) Should I ask the guy to basically take me out for a ride on the lake with it? I am not sure I will be able to do this, due to geographical concerns. Is it a terrible decision to buy a boat without test driving it on the water first? Or can one judge integrity from starting the engine on land and judging based off of those conditions?

My last questions surrounds if I do encounter any of these issues? Should any failure of any of these tests immediately result in a search for a different boat?

Do you guys feel with my mechanical knowledge that a glasser would be the best fit for the situation I am in? The idea of having one sounds like a dream to fish in, but it could also turn into a nightmare potentially. If all the checks pass, am I likely to be receiving a boat that will not cause many problems? (I am going off of probability here, obviously there isn't certainty)

Thank you guys very much! I was not going to do any of these checks before buying, WOW

Lets take it one question at a time.

Q 1) A compression test will let you know what kind of shape the engine is in internally, mechanical issues that can be revealed by performing this test is very important, any weak cylinder will tell you that the engine will need some major work performed, this could be a result of carbon build up or internal damage, yes, your mechanic will be able to perform this test, make sure the compression is no less than 125 psi in each cylinder.

Q 2) The transom is the rear panel going across the rear of the boat or what we refer to as the STERN,(back of the boat) the tightening of the bolts you were refering to is checking the transom for ROT, the wood panel that runs across the back will rot away and it can be difficult to see, the bolts should not tighten if the wood in the transom is solid, the check that I suggested checks the joining areas of the transom to the rear of the boat at each side and at the bottom.

Q 3) It depends on who did the work, most owners will take it upon themselves to repair a hull by using shortcuts, if a pro repaired it you really should not see any damage, one give away will be that the jell coat on the bottom will look new, if the owner took a shortcut, most likely there will be a noticeable patch of some sort, it is normal to see some scratches or even a scrape or two, just make sure there is no exposed wood anywhere under there and no patches.

Q 4) Turn the steering left and right first with no given pressure to the engine, it should be free and smooth, then apply resistance to the engine by having your friend hold in the opposite direction you are turning the wheel, this checks for worn teeth in the steering rack assy located at the bottom of the steering wheel, it also checks the free play from the rack to the engine, a small amount will be normal, but anything more than an 1/8 of a turn before the engine starts to rotate left or right is showing signs of wear.

Q 5) Since this is your first boat, I would suggest that a test drive is not an option, without that I would definatly walk away from it, show him you are a serious buyer and he/she should have no issues taking you for a ride, I would be serious about fishing a cove or two with it as well to ensure the trolling motor, live wells etc... function as stated, make sure the nav lights and everything works while on the water.

The last question you have asked is about if any of these tests fail should you walk away, well since you have said you only have X amount of dollars to spend, looking at the price of the boat really puts you right there at your max dollar amount you are willing to spend, I would suggest that if any issues come up that you do walk away, it really depends on what you find wrong and how severe the issue is, obviously, if it fails the compression test, you don't want to purchace the boat but if you have a nav light or something simular to that small issue, that really should not be hard to fix, but what if it runs into a wire repair? well a wire repair is not that expensive either since your friend is a mechanic he should be able to assist you with getting that resolved.

As far as a glasser goes, I feel you will be glad you have one, one of two things come to mind when choosing a boat, 1st is where are you fishing with it, along with that question comes a host of others, will you ever travel to places that you wish you had one, open waters a glasser is much more stable in rougher waters, wind induced or boat traffic induced, storage for just about anything you have can be kept on a glasser, not quite as much as with a flat bottom.

2nd thing is knowing the waters you fish or eventually want to fish, can you do the same thing with a flat bottom boat? you can do anything with a flat bottom boat you can do with a glasser and then some, with a flat bottom you can get into some really shallow waters and manoeuvre it in some really tight areas, they are much more forgiving in cases such as banging a rock than a glasser would be, another thing is you have less to go wrong with a flat bottom, less wireing etc...

They both have their up's and down's you just need to decide how and where each will better suit you.

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What do you guys think about this boat? http://cgi.ebay.com/...9#ht_2144wt_754

It does not have a motor, but seems like I could maybe put a cheap one in. Why would a boat not have a motor? That is confusing. If I could get that for ~$2500 it seems like it has future potential and value. What do you think?

And this one http://cgi.ebay.com/...1#ht_500wt_1182

Boat #1) Unless you have an extra few thousand laying around somewhere, thats a no, and there is no such thing as finding a cheap replacement engine, it's just not gonna happen, I will say it is a pretty good looking ride though !!!

Boat #2) Keep looking !!!

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Repowering that boat will not be cheap. The hull does look pretty clean. Personally, I'd get something turnkey.

You are right, I am seeing a common theme here. I can't afford the boat #1 listed on the second set of boats.

First boat will cost you more to put a decent motor and controls on it. Probably a minimum 150hp. Probably cost more than the boat. 2nd one looks decent. Make sure you have the motor/hull checked out. If everything is in working order, that's less money you will have to spend to fix it up.

Yeah the second boat I am actually really interested in unless there is a reason I shouldn't be. I spoke with the guy and he is willing to let me test drive and has answered all of the questions you guys told me to inspect. So, I will have to inspect these in person for myself and with my mechanic, but he says they all are in working order and without nay problems in all aspects mentioned.

Him willing to test drive is a +++

How much do you think that boat is worth? He has it listed for $1900, is that considered a flat bottom boat? I'm guessing its not a glasser.

Boat #1) Unless you have an extra few thousand laying around somewhere, thats a no, and there is no such thing as finding a cheap replacement engine, it's just not gonna happen, I will say it is a pretty good looking ride though !!!

Boat #2) Keep looking !!!

Yeah you are right about boat #1. It would cost way too much and is out of reach.

Why should I not consider boat #2? It seems pretty decent.

Lets take it one question at a time.

Q 1) A compression test will let you know what kind of shape the engine is in internally, mechanical issues that can be revealed by performing this test is very important, any weak cylinder will tell you that the engine will need some major work performed, this could be a result of carbon build up or internal damage, yes, your mechanic will be able to perform this test, make sure the compression is no less than 125 psi in each cylinder.

Q 2) The transom is the rear panel going across the rear of the boat or what we refer to as the STERN,(back of the boat) the tightening of the bolts you were refering to is checking the transom for ROT, the wood panel that runs across the back will rot away and it can be difficult to see, the bolts should not tighten if the wood in the transom is solid, the check that I suggested checks the joining areas of the transom to the rear of the boat at each side and at the bottom.

Q 3) It depends on who did the work, most owners will take it upon themselves to repair a hull by using shortcuts, if a pro repaired it you really should not see any damage, one give away will be that the jell coat on the bottom will look new, if the owner took a shortcut, most likely there will be a noticeable patch of some sort, it is normal to see some scratches or even a scrape or two, just make sure there is no exposed wood anywhere under there and no patches.

Q 4) Turn the steering left and right first with no given pressure to the engine, it should be free and smooth, then apply resistance to the engine by having your friend hold in the opposite direction you are turning the wheel, this checks for worn teeth in the steering rack assy located at the bottom of the steering wheel, it also checks the free play from the rack to the engine, a small amount will be normal, but anything more than an 1/8 of a turn before the engine starts to rotate left or right is showing signs of wear.

Q 5) Since this is your first boat, I would suggest that a test drive is not an option, without that I would definatly walk away from it, show him you are a serious buyer and he/she should have no issues taking you for a ride, I would be serious about fishing a cove or two with it as well to ensure the trolling motor, live wells etc... function as stated, make sure the nav lights and everything works while on the water.

The last question you have asked is about if any of these tests fail should you walk away, well since you have said you only have X amount of dollars to spend, looking at the price of the boat really puts you right there at your max dollar amount you are willing to spend, I would suggest that if any issues come up that you do walk away, it really depends on what you find wrong and how severe the issue is, obviously, if it fails the compression test, you don't want to purchace the boat but if you have a nav light or something simular to that small issue, that really should not be hard to fix, but what if it runs into a wire repair? well a wire repair is not that expensive either since your friend is a mechanic he should be able to assist you with getting that resolved.

As far as a glasser goes, I feel you will be glad you have one, one of two things come to mind when choosing a boat, 1st is where are you fishing with it, along with that question comes a host of others, will you ever travel to places that you wish you had one, open waters a glasser is much more stable in rougher waters, wind induced or boat traffic induced, storage for just about anything you have can be kept on a glasser, not quite as much as with a flat bottom.

2nd thing is knowing the waters you fish or eventually want to fish, can you do the same thing with a flat bottom boat? you can do anything with a flat bottom boat you can do with a glasser and then some, with a flat bottom you can get into some really shallow waters and manoeuvre it in some really tight areas, they are much more forgiving in cases such as banging a rock than a glasser would be, another thing is you have less to go wrong with a flat bottom, less wireing etc...

They both have their up's and down's you just need to decide how and where each will better suit you.

Thank you for the greatly informative post. I have saved these comments as a document and a printout that I will bring to all inspections. Thank you for writing it in a way that I can understand, since I am new to the terminology. Everything you mention makes since and your philosophy is consistent and in line with the philosophy I need for this purchase

Just curious, since I will be mostly fishing 100 acre lakes and I will not be taking it out on lake michigan or any 9 mile lake....would it be better to get a flatbottom? Getting into those tight areas I feel is great for catching fish. The only thing I encounter is going into shallow weedy areas. I have not encountered going through rocky bottomed, or having any wood obstructions. The glacier lakes here in michigan are pretty safe boat wise.

Look forward to hearing your comments on boat #2 posted on ebay. I'll quote the guys response.

"Mike

The engine runs fine I welcome you to put it in the water and check out all systems. You are also welcome to have a compression check or any other diagnostic done as well.

The hull is in excellent condition and the deck is solid no dry rot what so ever. It has all been inspected. I do not have a cover so the seats are the only questionable area.

These are easily replaced for a nominal cost if you would choose to do that. The trolling motor is perfect and the steering is excellent as I maintain all the greasable fittings regularly,

as well as the bearings on the trailer.

My reason for selling is that the transmission went out on my truck and it is $1800 to replace with a rebuilt one and due to family employment issues I find myself financially unable to come up with the funds otherwise in a timely manner."

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Well, what I was looking at is that it looks like a sun dried tomato, sun scortching can reek havoc on fiberglass and plastic parts, but if the owner is that coopertive it may be worth the trip, for me though 1900.00 is pretty steep for a boat that old and needing new interior.

I purchaced a 17 foot Nitro that needed a complete resoration, I first saw the boat I thought no way, the thing was black with dirt from sitting near a gravel road, he was asking the same price as this one, the trailer was even rusted with metal patch work he tried to hide with new paint, the engine ran but not well, compression was good so I thought carbs or electrical, ended up being both, I told the guy 500 was all I was willing to go, he cursed me and I gave him my phone number anyway just incase he were to reconsider, I have had the boat for a long time now but it has taken a lot of work, I knew what I was getting into and I am thinking there are better deals.

post-28162-0-14348700-1350499823_thumb.j

As for what you will be doing with the boat, I would think about either, and keep looking for either, try fishing from them both and get a feel for what you would like better, for what you will be doing you should enjoy both, fishing from them will make your decision much, much easier on you.

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is that considered a flat bottom boat? I'm guessing its not a glasser.

The boat in question is a glasser or what we call a fiberglass boat, there are two types that are most common V-hull although some boats have more than one V but we wont get into that stuff we may do more harm than help, and there is also a flat bottom glasser, most of those are on show boats where you can look down through the bottom of the boat and see under the boat, some are pure glass others are a fiberglass mix, or fiberglass just as this one is and used for other commercial fishing etc...

V hull gets its name from the way the hull looks up front, in this case look at the boat hull it looks like a V, flat bottom boats that I was talking about was actually an aluminum flat bottom boat, much like the one in the first picture but instead of the V hull it has a flat bottom almost all the way toward the front or bow of the boat.

Aluminum flat bottom boats are much lighter and can be dressed up with storage lockers, live wells, fishing platforms, etc... if you can find a good deal on one you can make it what you want it to be and make it fit your needs, just make sure it's a wide one not a long skinny one, like posted before the wider the better and more stable it will be for you.

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Well, what I was looking at is that it looks like a sun dried tomato, sun scortching can reek havoc on fiberglass and plastic parts, but if the owner is that coopertive it may be worth the trip, for me though 1900.00 is pretty steep for a boat that old and needing new interior.

I purchaced a 17 foot Nitro that needed a complete resoration, I first saw the boat I thought no way, the thing was black with dirt from sitting near a gravel road, he was asking the same price as this one, the trailer was even rusted with metal patch work he tried to hide with new paint, the engine ran but not well, compression was good so I thought carbs or electrical, ended up being both, I told the guy 500 was all I was willing to go, he cursed me and I gave him my phone number anyway just incase he were to reconsider, I have had the boat for a long time now but it has taken a lot of work, I knew what I was getting into and I am thinking there are better deals.

post-28162-0-14348700-1350499823_thumb.j

As for what you will be doing with the boat, I would think about either, and keep looking for either, try fishing from them both and get a feel for what you would like better, for what you will be doing you should enjoy both, fishing from them will make your decision much, much easier on you.

Very nice boat Nitro! I know you put some time into it, but I would take it off your hands for $500 :laugh5:

The shape of the interior is not a huge concern for me. I know it is ridiculously expensive to have to replace all the carpeting and give it a new paint job, but ergonomics is my #1 concern. I just want to fish!! and I feel the condition of the interior is a good way to barter the price down. What do you think this boat is ultimately worth? "http://cgi.ebay.com/...1#ht_500wt_1182"

Are those fish finders any good? The Hummingbird 160 and 540? And how about the trolling motor with the new battery, any comments on that?

The boat seems like it could be a good fit for the right price. Or is the shape of this boat not going to be comfortable to fish from? Also, I do not see a great place for my girlfriend to lay out and tan..... :lolk:

Okay I am going to make an assumption about your post right about mine. The boat I am questioning is considered a "glasser" and is 'v-hull' because of that shape in the front?

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What Jason Karol wrote X2.

Have a marine tech check out the boat, motor and trailer for hidden defects and problems.

Good luck.

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Very nice boat Nitro! I know you put some time into it, but I would take it off your hands for $500 :laugh5:

The shape of the interior is not a huge concern for me. I know it is ridiculously expensive to have to replace all the carpeting and give it a new paint job, but ergonomics is my #1 concern. I just want to fish!! and I feel the condition of the interior is a good way to barter the price down. What do you think this boat is ultimately worth? "http://cgi.ebay.com/...1#ht_500wt_1182"

Are those fish finders any good? The Hummingbird 160 and 540? And how about the trolling motor with the new battery, any comments on that?

The boat seems like it could be a good fit for the right price. Or is the shape of this boat not going to be comfortable to fish from? Also, I do not see a great place for my girlfriend to lay out and tan..... :lolk:

Okay I am going to make an assumption about your post right about mine. The boat I am questioning is considered a "glasser" and is 'v-hull' because of that shape in the front?

First, Thanx, it means a lot !!!, and No thanx it's not for sale LOL , especially for 500 bucks Ha Ha, I still have too much fun with her anyway.

As for the price, it's really not how much it's worth to me, how much would it be worth for you? I have a sentimental side that plays with prices, this cat needs the money it seems for financial reasons and I feel his pain, that is if his story is true, so I would be willing to go as high as what the boat actually blue books at, maybe a touch more to help the guy out, see what the actual value of the boat is worth and go from there would be my suggestion, it sounds like he is willing to do anything to get rid of this boat so be careful with these kind of situations.

As for the sonar units, I have no opinion, I have not ever seen nor used any of them to give you an honest answer, but on your test drive you can check them out, as long as they work and show good detail of the structure below the boat, they will be good units.

The trolling motor should be ok, I personally do not like cable drives for the simple fact of, I am old LOL !!

I like to stand the whole time I am fishing and having one leg propped up on a pedal wears me out, but you have a good chair on the front so it should be a comfortable fit.

Your assumption is correct, it is a V-Hull glasser.

As for you girl not having any room to lay out and tan, no comment LOL !!

Once you take everything into concideration, one thing that I would suggest is to have someone with you that has operated a boat or that owns a boat that you trust to tell you the truth and let them drive the boat, since this is your first one the more feedback you can get the better.

As a last opinion I would suggest the same as Sam and Jason, if there is a boat shop somewhere that you trust, no one will be able to tell you more than they can, an honest opinion from them is worth more than the price of the boat, your safety is second to nothing when it comes to purchacing a boat, especially your first one.

Let us know what you decide !!!

Good luck and be safe !!!

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