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JonBailey

Boat Buying Sense

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Stop buying new boats until builders and dealers are finally convinced they should sell for considerably less than a new car.

 

They are a total rip-off along with outboards.

 

Buy used. Never pay more than half than comparable new retail for any used boat.

 

Pay cash or DON'T buy it.

 

Your best preowned boat deal will come from a Craigslist classified widow who doesn't know what it is worth.

 

Don't you dare finance outdoor recreation items. It is time America ends this modern-day debt culture. 

 

There is no reason under the sun a NEW 16-17-foot aluminum boat as from Lowe, Lund, Klamath, Crestliner, Ranger and others should

cost as much as if not more than a NEW automobile. This is a boat that includes a 25-to-50 horse outboard, a steering wheel, navigation lights,

a gas gauge, a speedometer, a compass and a trailer. 

 

Back in the 1970's, a new boat in that class would have retailed for about HALF what a new full-size Ford, Dodge or Chevrolet sedan retailed back then. 

 

These boats, oversized aluminum cans, and their OUTBOARDS are nowhere near mechanically complex like an automobile. 

 

Aluminum boats used to be for weekend blue-collar sportsmen on beer budgets and priced like so. After all, beer cans are made of aluminum. 

 

The market is dictated by the people. If people wised up and simply don't pay these stupid high prices, builders and dealers will have no choice but

to come down in price. 

 

About 85% of a new boat retail sale these days is pure profit for builders, outboard makers and dealers combined. 

 

They can easily mass produce these floating aluminum things like compact cars and the way the Japanese did cheap motorcycles in the 1960s and 1970s. 

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Just outsource the work to Mexico or elsewhere and buy a crap product like GM sells. If you cant afford a new boat, then don't buy one. A new 16ft Lund with a 50hp is priced less than $16k which is cheaper than any new automobile that I know of.

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I like this except the part of ripping off the old-widow. lol.

An old Catholic Irish gent from San Francisco I knew who was a shrewd businessman recommended that part about buying things in pre-owned condition CHEAP from unsuspecting widows. This man had a heart of stone, I admit. 

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Just outsource the work to Mexico or elsewhere and buy a crap product like GM sells. If you cant afford a new boat, then don't buy one. A new 16ft Lund with a 50hp is priced less than $16k which is cheaper than any new automobile that I know of.

Back in the 1970's a boat in the class of that Lund would have sold for about half the price of a new Chevy Impala and no more. 

 

A new 2014 Nissan Versa car retails for about $11,900 and has a heater, air conditioning, automatic transmission, a 4-cylinder engine, complex suspension, abs brakes, a closed cabin, air bags, stereo, a top speed of over 80 mph unlike that new Lund. 

 

I agree, if you can't PAY cash for any boat, don't buy one. New boats are jacked up high because too many guys are buying these things on time. 

 

By the way does that new Lund even have a steering wheel?

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Back in the 1970's a boat in the class of that Lund would have sold for about half the price of a new 1970's Chevy Impala sedan and no more. About $3,000 MAX with motor, steering wheel, trailer and everything. Tiller control is pure torment to operate. 

 

A new 2014 Nissan Versa car retails for about $11,900 and has a heater, air conditioning, automatic transmission, a 4-cylinder engine, complex suspension, abs brakes, a closed cabin, air bags, stereo, a top speed of over 80 mph unlike that new Lund. Of course, that Versa won't catch many bass, trout or salmon. 

 

I agree, if you can't PAY cash for any boat, don't buy one. New boats, low-horsepower motorcycles and even cars are jacked up high because too many guys are buying these things on time. 

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An old Catholic Irish gent from San Francisco I knew who was a shrewd businessman recommended that part about buying things in pre-owned condition CHEAP from unsuspecting widows or "estate sales". This man had a heart of stone, I admit.  Patience pays off to get a pre-owned quality boat for your petty blue-collar dollar. 

 

Pretty soon these weekend-warrior bass boats might be "Walmart-ized" from an assembly line in China. 

 

Aluminum boats have advantages: cheap and easy to maintain but certainly not cheap to buy new these days, not hard to clean or detail, never rusts or rots, lightweight, easy to trailer and load. Good on gas as far as boats go. Low gunwale height above the water means easy to get an overboard man or dog back on board. Nothing complex to fall apart unlike wood or fiberglass. You can't really damage an aluminum hull by beaching.  Aluminum is more forgiving than 'glass when running aground, a rock or into a snag in the lake. Aluminum boats are mostly outboard for mechanical simplicity and more room on deck.

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Back in the 1970's a boat in the class of that Lund would have sold for about half the price of a new Chevy Impala and no more. 

 

A new 2014 Nissan Versa car retails for about $11,900 and has a heater, air conditioning, automatic transmission, a 4-cylinder engine, complex suspension, abs brakes, a closed cabin, air bags, stereo, a top speed of over 80 mph unlike that new Lund. 

 

I agree, if you can't PAY cash for any boat, don't buy one. New boats are jacked up high because too many guys are buying these things on time. 

The prices are high because they can't/don't do the volume of the auto manufacturer. A boat is considered a luxury item. A car is not. If you're going to pay a skilled tradesman a decent wage to build a boat and a motor, completely made in America, the money comes out of the end consumers pocket. Canadian tin boat manufacturers get a good buck for their boats as well. If you want your boats built in Mexico or China, than voicing your opinion here is not going to work. I suggest you contact those in charge of Brunswick and let them know how you feel.     

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Jon you appear quite passionate about new boat prices.

 

I agree the prices seem disproportionally high when compared to a new automobile.

 

However, history has proven that once a market price is set and especially after it has been established for a while, only in very rare instances has the price of anything  ever come down.  Sure, it may fluctuate a bit but never reaches a low of several years past.

There would have to be some type of major event, like gas prices going to $10 a gallon, before boat prices would change much. 

If anything they will continue to rise.

 

A-Jay

 

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The prices are high because they can't/don't do the volume of the auto manufacturer. A boat is considered a luxury item. A car is not. If you're going to pay a skilled tradesman a decent wage to build a boat and a motor, completely made in America, the money comes out of the end consumers pocket. Canadian tin boat manufacturers get a good buck for their boats as well. If you want your boats built in Mexico or China, than voicing your opinion here is not going to work. I suggest you contact those in charge of Brunswick and let them know how you feel.     

A bare-bones open 16' aluminum fishing boat sans heater, power steering, closed cabin weather protection and air conditioning is hardly a luxury item to me but a serious game-fish-getting/duck-getting tool. The Queen Mary is a LUXURY item but she is a bit overkill for lake, delta or river fishing. You can buy a $10,000 Beretta over/under shotgun made in Italy or a Mossberg 930 autoloader for under $600 made in America that will shoot just as many ducks, doves and pheasants dead. 

 

American sportsmen working stiffs need the "Mossberg" of fishing boats! 

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Jon you appear quite passionate about new boat prices.

 

I agree the prices seem disproportionally high when compared to a new automobile.

 

However, history has proven that once a market price is set and especially after it has been established for a while, only in very rare instances has the price of anything  ever come down.  Sure, it may fluctuate a bit but never reaches a low of several years past.

There would have to be some type of major event, like gas prices going to $10 a gallon, before boat prices would change much. 

If anything they will continue to rise.

 

A-Jay

 

Unless American sportsmen stop financing these new boats. I bet at least 90% of them are not paid cash for. 

Financing a new toy is like buying it with money you don't have. So, if you have a stack of credit cards in your wallet,

you are less put off by moon-high sticker prices than the hard-nosed disciplined cash-only buyer. 

 

Buying needless stuff on time is the biggest price jacker in markets. That is why the American economy went into the dumper. This happened with the housing crisis. People were buying things on time and priced well over their heads.  Cash used to be king and a man's hard-earned dollar used to mean something. It makes more since to buy a new car or truck on time if that is absolutely needed for business or work but you buy something sensible still. You don't finance a new BMW while working at McDonalds. A toy should never be financed by the working class however. The true rich don't buy aluminum bass boats but sea-going yachts. The same goes for home buying. Don't finance a mansion working as a McDonald's manager: take out a 30-year mortgage on a double-wide, maybe. 

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Jon you appear quite passionate about new boat prices.

 

I agree the prices seem disproportionally high when compared to a new automobile.

 

However, history has proven that once a market price is set and especially after it has been established for a while, only in very rare instances has the price of anything  ever come down.  Sure, it may fluctuate a bit but never reaches a low of several years past.

There would have to be some type of major event, like gas prices going to $10 a gallon, before boat prices would change much. 

If anything they will continue to rise.

 

A-Jay

 

Unless American sportsmen stop financing these new boats. I bet at least 90% of them are not paid cash for. 

Financing a new toy is like buying it with money you don't have. So, if you have a stack of credit cards in your wallet,

you are less put off by moon-high sticker prices than the hard-nosed disciplined cash-only buyer. 

 

Buying needless stuff on time is the biggest price jacker in markets. That is why the American economy went into the dumper. This happened with the housing crisis. People were buying things on time and priced well over their heads.  Cash used to be king and a man's hard-earned dollar used to mean something. It makes more since to buy a new car or truck on time if that is absolutely needed for business or work but you buy something sensible still. You don't finance a new BMW while working at McDonalds. A toy should never be financed by the working class however. The true rich don't buy aluminum bass boats but sea-going yachts. The same goes for home buying. Don't finance a mansion working as a McDonald's manager: take out a 30-year mortgage on a double-wide, maybe. 

 

 

That's your story and I'm sure you're sticking you it.

 

Did you know you can save 15% on car insurance with Geico ?

 

A-Jay

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Is the purpose of your post to lecture people on how to spend their money because you know better?

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That's your story and I'm sure you're sticking you it.

 

Did you know you can save 15% on car insurance with Geico ?

 

A-Jay

We all do agree that boat dealers and boat makers are getting whatever buyers are actually paying for them. The market is strictly in the CONSUMER's hands. 

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We all do agree that boat dealers and boat makers are getting whatever buyers are actually paying for them.  

And?

Walmart sells Simply Orange orange juice in a 2 pack for $5.98. I pay $5.98 if I want Simply Orange. I don't have to buy Simply Orange. I don't even have to buy orange juice. If I lived in FL and had the land and knowledge, I bet I could grow my own trees and make my own juice. I would rather have someone make the orange juice for me and give them the asking price. If they jacked up the price to $50.98 for a 2 pack, I don't have to buy the Simply Orange and may just buy Juicy Juice instead

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Is the purpose of your post to lecture people on how to spend their money because you know better?

I can't tell people what to do but I am just trying to share a little economic wisdom here. I just hate to see a poor working American stiff suffer economic hardships just to dip a line on weekends if the poor guy is not working on weekends too just to pay his rent.

 

It is your money or stack of credit cards, not mine. 

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I can't tell people what to do but I am just trying to share a little economic wisdom here. I just hate to see a poor working American stiff suffer economic hardships just to dip a line on weekends if the poor guy is not working on weekends too just to pay his rent.

 

It is your money or stack of credit cards, not mine. 

 

On behalf of all of us poor working stiffs,  thank you for sharing you thoughts Jon.

 

As one of the newest members here, in 10 posts you've managed to establish your reputation as Mr. Economic Wisdom.

 

Good Job.

 

A-Jay

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I think we've made our points here. What someone uses their savings and/or credit for is their business, so long they do not live beyond their means. Then it's the lender's business.

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