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roadwarrior

Guaranteed To Catch Bass

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Know also that if you follow these steps, RW will be able to explain to you later all the different things you will have learned without even knowing it, whether you caught or not.

Fishing like this, with soft plastics in general, will build skills that will help you learn most other baits with ease.  This is a "slow" type of fishing.  The hardest, (mentally-patience-wise) yet one of the most productive.  Follow these instructions to a "T" and successs will be eminent.  Get this tactic under your belt and you'll be surprised how ahead of the game you are when you move on to other types of baits and lures.

Most important:  Pay attention to every little detail.  You will be picking things up (retaining in memory) without even knowing it.

Great post RW, way to help out.  

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this is incredibly good advice.  if you want to catch fish there is no better way imo to consistently get bit.  this is what i tell anyone, new to fishing or not, when they tell me they are never catching fish.

keep a close eye on your line and let it fall on a slack line and you cant go far wrong.

this is what got my young son and wife hooked on fishing (although thet used a wacky rig but same basic idea)

good advice RW,

matt

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THANKS ROADWORRIOR,

I DON'T SEEM TO HAVE THE SUCCESS WITH SENKOS THAT EVERYBODY ELSE DOES. I HAVE CAUGHT A FEW ON SMOKE PEARL BLUE #229 AND BUBBLEGUM #240 JUST NOT CONSISTANTLY. AS SOON AS OUR WEATHER CLEARS I'M GOING TO TRY YOUR SUGGESTION.

THANKS ALOT,

FALCON

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Following those instructions will definitely be a challenge for me. I would really like to develop the patience to perform those tactics that you describe.

I am more of a run-and-gun type, but I have become very aware of my lack of patience. Thanks for the post and reminding us all that a slow presentation will often produce results.

Wayne

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I have to agree RW.  If someone follows that to a T, I think its would almost physically impossible not to catch a fish. .

Simple advice and very effective.  

Most important:  Pay attention to every little detail.
LBH

IMO,  if this is one of the most important things a fisherman can do.

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RW- for us rookies out here, could you go into a little detail about the difference between a well defined cove and a bay please?

thank you.

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Generally a well defined cove will have a tributary channel, often with graduated banks on at least one side. A cove provides some protection and a food base for bait fish which attracts predators. A bay, by contrast is usually associated with the main body of water, an indentation of the shoreline, and tends to have a less fertile environment.

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You're right.  Senkos and Fat Ikas are proven fish catchers, regardless of the mood the fish are in.  The color is a good one too.  Watermelon/black or watermelonseed will work in just about any color water.  If they aren't biting senkos or ikas today, then they will be soon.  That's just about a proven fact anywhere I fish.  I always have one tied on, though I use baitcasting gear instead of spinning gear.  That's because I suck with spinning reels though, not that there is anything wrong with them.

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Guest avid

Kudos to RW for picking up on the fact many newer members are struggling.  His advice re: Senko in the 194 color is excellent.  Be advised, color does matter.  The 194 is sold at Wal-Mart and other major retail outlets (like Sears).

Jomatty also makes an excellent point.  When fishing soft plastics you MUST be a line watcher.  Many "hits" are not strikes that you will feel.  Often you see the line twitch or move off to side, or just do something different.  Remeber, if it's not a natural movement than it's no doubt a fish.  Set the hook !!!!!

PS> getting the slack out before setting the hook is important. You need to reel down untill the line is taut then set the hook.  

Back in the "rubber worm" days, you had to pretty quick or the fish would drop the bait, but now with all the salt and flavor built into the lures, the bass hold on.  Don't panic. Just reel in the slack and when 99% of the slack is out give a sharp jerk.  It's the rod tip that needs to move so get your writst into that hook set.

Good luck and have fun.  

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Aint Texan,

I want the people not catching bass to use smaller diameter line (#6) and I prefer Hybrid or P-Line because is has a higher breaking point than a true 6 lb test line. For a lot of guys, particularly when you are new to the game, throwing weightless soft plastics and using light line on a baitcaster can be challenging.

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the only thing i would disagree w/ is starting an inexperienced bass fisherman out on 6# test line.the slightest mistake a 6# test is popped.

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#6 Hybrid is 11.9 lb test.

P-line #6 is rated 8.4 lbs, but I think it's stronger than that.

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IMO the senko was designed to throw on spinning equipment along docks, weedline edges, or other open ambush points.  I use 8lb flourocarbon on a 7'1" BSR852 rod.  Makes an excellent senko rod.

You guys with patience problems should fish a senko over suspended fish in about 20+ ft of water.  You will learn patience real quick or go crazy. ;)  This lure also works very well in cold water.  That slow fall wiggle is just a fish producing lure.

IMO the senko is like a tube.  There is no wrong way to fish it.  Anyway it is fished it will work!

Patience is a Virtue, and virtues are rewarded with big fish. 8-)

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Start with the Senko. Cast parallel to the bank, out 10-15 yards. Let the bait sink to the bottom, count to 30 (as in 30 seconds) then move the Senko 6-12" with a slow horizontal sweep, allowing the bait to fall on slack line. Count to 10, then repeat. Continue all the way back, move ten steps forward and repeat.

I have one question about this.  At what angle to the shore are you talking about making your cast.  If you cast parallel to shore, you can't get the bait 10-15 yds out (heck, if you REALLY cast parallel to the shore you will NEVER get the bait off the shore at all).  The angle is important because the closer to parallel the longer the cast and the farther you will have to get the bait back to you.  The more perpendicular the cast, the less time the bait will spend in the strike zone.  

Is 45 degrees a good compromise between length of cast and length of time the bait is in the strike zone?  

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Two more tips to add to Rw's post- Sometimes you won't get a bite because your worm is hitting the water to hard/loud.  To counter this simply stop the line from comming off of the reel. If using a spinning reel, I grab the line seconds before the worm hits the water.  If using a baitcaster, simply stop the spool by placing your thumb on it, as you would to stop the spool anyway. The worm will have a near silent entry to the water.  It takes a little practice, so keep at it.

When walking around the shore, target the outside edges in any emergent weeds that you can see.  Most of the time the active bass will be on the points of the weed beds, and the inactive bass will be on the inside turns.  

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Touche'

FatBoy,

You are technically correct unless there is an outcropping that allows you to stand out from the general shoreline. I suppose 45 degrees is reasonable, but it is important to try to fish "approximately" parallel to the bank in order to keep the bait in the strike zone.

BASS Fisherman,

I think a big splash attracts bass, but with these baits, that is not really an issue.

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Guest the_muddy_man

Great post Roadwarrior. I can tell you I was reluctant to try Senkos, and when I did RW steered me to the senko thread at the beginning of FAQ and I fished senko(knock offs) as much as any other bait WITH THE HIGHEST SUCSESS RATE OF ALL MY FAVORITES. Listen to him nd LBH in this area they really know their stuff ;)

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BASS Fisherman,

I think a big splash attracts bass, but with these baits, that is not really an issue.

From my experience, not as much as yours, lol ;D, I have found that the majority of the time, yes a splash or a kerplunk noise will attract bass, but not always. Just last night, I was throwing a black senko with blue flakes, at night. The first 25 casts I threw normal, and didn't get a bite. Then I started stopping the bait, for a silent entry. I caught 2 within 10 minutes. I have had a few other times that I noticed the same pattern. The bass were spooky, and only hit a lure or bait with a silent entry. Next time your throwing a senko, and not getting many bites, try the silent entry, I gaurantee more bass. At least in Pa it works like that. I know Im weird, but Im not crazy. :-/ ;D

The first big bass 5+ lb I got, I had noticed that the bass were turned on by a certain kerplunk of the senko hitting the water.  I continued throwing the senko into the air and into a thick weed bed.  As soon as the senko hit the water, I had a 5lb 4oz LM bass hit the senko.  I wrestled her out of the weeds, and I had my first nice bass.  It was 2am when I caught her in case you all are wondering.  

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IMO what we consider a "silent" entry is still enough of a splash to attract/excite an aggressive bass even at a distance.  

Great advice RW.  When you are losing confidence or not producing and getting frustrated it's time to get back to the basics!  I will probably find myself getting back to those basics this weekend in a tournament.  I generally fish the senko and any soft plastics for that matter in the way you've described but sometimes catch myself lacking the patience or getting in a hurry and not staying slow enough when the pressure is on.  

Thanks for the reminder!

B

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About 3 weeks ago, I put away the trick worms and started using  5" senkos. I went looking for the healthiest grass at my home lake and began working both the inner and outer edges of it.  After four trips, I am fully convinced that this bait lives up to all the hype, perhaps even surpasses it.  I perfer tossing a wacky rig (imagine that), but numbers were caught with a w/l tx-rig also.  The trick worms are staying  in the tackle for now. ;)

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Aint Texan,

I want the people not catching bass to use smaller diameter line (#6) and I prefer Hybrid or P-Line because is has a higher breaking point than a true 6 lb test line. For a lot of guys, particularly when you are new to the game, throwing weightless soft plastics and using light line on a baitcaster can be challenging.

I suppose you're right, but I don't think you grasp how bad I suck with a spinning outfit.  I'd end up foul hooking myself in the nose lol.  I'm horrid with those things.  You're absolutely right though.  Light line does suck on a bait caster unless you're really used to it.  I use a 14# Silver Thread myself, but for the newer anglers, baitcasters or heavier line isn't very easy to learn with.  I was a saltwater fisher long before fresh and grew up on baitcasters.  If I could do it all over again, I'd learn a spinner, but I'm too far gone in my ways.

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Don't worry about the splash, concentrate more on paying attention to your line, especially as it sinks.  Often you'll see the line jump, twitch or just plain start taking off.  

Reel in the slack while lowering your rod tip towards the direction the line is going and then set the hook.

When I fished ponds from shore, I would quitely approach, sometimes even crouching, and cast VERY parallel to the shore for the first cast.  Maybe 2 ft off the shore.  I do this on the left and also the right.  From there, I will fan cast that area till I have exhausted all angles from bank to straight out in front of me.

Then I'll move( making sure I released all the fish RW just turned me on to of course ;) ) to another spot on the shore, as far away from the last spot as possible and repeat.  Keep doing this till you've covered all the reachable water.

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