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dropshot rig-how long should the space between hook and sinker be?

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How long should be the space between the hook and the sinker in a dropshot rig? I just learned the dropshot fishing technique a couple weeks ago, and has been very successful with a 12" space until I lost my first dropshot rig. I caught a lot of bass with the dropshot rig with a 3" plastic worms.

 

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Here ya go!

 

 

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Hello and Welcome to Bass Resource ~

Drop shot weight leader length depends on a few different factors.

Of immediate concern is how closely to the bottom the fish you are targeting are positioned.

Another factor is whether an angler is fishing the rig vertically or perhaps casting it out a ways.  Both are effective.

When casting, the distance of the cast, the depth of the water and the length of the dropper all play a role in determining just how far off the bottom a presentation will actually be.  A casted drop shot often benefits from a bit longer dropper length especially when keeping a bait out of bottom weeds or other snags is part of the objective.

A vertical presentation is usually a bit shorter and a bit easier to equate as there are little to no line angle involved.

Nothing wrong with a little trial & error.

Good Luck

A-Jay

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My answer to that question is to experiment. I've caught fish with the leader being 1 inch and with it being 3 feet. Usually 8-14 inches is a good place to start but other than that, let the fish tell you what they want. Another tip is to always start long because you can shorten your leader easily but you can't lengthen it too easily!

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Watch Glenn's video, very informative.

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I catch 1000 + fish dropshotting every season, my go to length between the hook and sinker is about 14", I don't measure it exactly, just eyeball it up. Very VERY rarely will I make it longer, I actually can't think of the last time I did. My reasoning is............if fish are that far off the bottom, there are better ways to catch them. I do however run it as short as 6-7" (basically 1/2 the usual length) especially in cold water, or tough conditions.

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I would 2nd what A-Jay said. I am always around the 12-15 inch mark on leader length generally. I am normally casting them 90% of the time so I don't want them too long. Also I try to take into account just how high the aquatic vegetation is off the bottom (when applicable) and to an extent the depth of water I am fishing vs where in the water column the fish are. I fish this presentation in 2 - 20+ FOW.

One other tip that I rarely ever see mentioned that I like to do is to use a lighter # leader. So if I am running say 8# main line I will use a 4# leader. The reason is simple. If I snag up or wedge the sinker in something to where I can't get it back when I go to break it (90% of the time the leader will break) and you will get your hook back which is the more expensive part. The only place this wouldn't hold true is if your hook is snagged as well. This saves time retying and money on sinkers.

So I am using 8# main line, to a VMC spinshot hook, to a 12-15 inch leader line in 4# and usually the cylinder style weights in 3/16 or 1/4 oz.

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I agree with ww2farmer.  12 to 14 inches is a good starting point. Adjust as needed. 

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I like the 6'' to 18'' as a very general guideline. I wouldn't over think it. Though a few inches can make a difference, much more often then not, it wont.

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8 hours ago, RyanFishing said:

My answer to that question is to experiment. I've caught fish with the leader being 1 inch and with it being 3 feet. Usually 8-14 inches is a good place to start but other than that, let the fish tell you what they want. Another tip is to always start long because you can shorten your leader easily but you can't lengthen it too easily!

Start long - find that out the hard way in the last few trips.

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5 hours ago, kickerfish1 said:

I would 2nd what A-Jay said. I am always around the 12-15 inch mark on leader length generally. I am normally casting them 90% of the time so I don't want them too long. Also I try to take into account just how high the aquatic vegetation is off the bottom (when applicable) and to an extent the depth of water I am fishing vs where in the water column the fish are. I fish this presentation in 2 - 20+ FOW.

One other tip that I rarely ever see mentioned that I like to do is to use a lighter # leader. So if I am running say 8# main line I will use a 4# leader. The reason is simple. If I snag up or wedge the sinker in something to where I can't get it back when I go to break it (90% of the time the leader will break) and you will get your hook back which is the more expensive part. The only place this wouldn't hold true is if your hook is snagged as well. This saves time retying and money on sinkers.

So I am using 8# main line, to a VMC spinshot hook, to a 12-15 inch leader line in 4# and usually the cylinder style weights in 3/16 or 1/4 oz.

ya, my main line is 15 pounds with an intention to catch snakeheads. My #6 or #8 lines broke in the last few years fishing so are not using 15 pounds.  

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I tried 24" and it works too. Will try less than 6" later. No confidence in trying this though

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I've found visibility and where the fish are sitting plays a fairly big roll. If i have one foot of vision, I'm not going to put it 24 plus inches apart if theyre glued to the bottom. It all depends on the water and fish.

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12-14" inches is about the same with me too.  One local pro said you want that section of line a minimum of at least 1.5x the length of the plastic you're using.  Another guy on the local college team said he only puts it at about 4" and catches them fine.  One good thing about the crimped dropshot weight is that you can always start with a long distance, and shorten it if you're not getting any bites to see if you have any more success that way.

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I adjust as I watch the fish approach on the graph. 18" seems to be the cut off for gobies. Any shorter and they may harass you. 

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i'm usually around 12-18 inches, no exact science there.  but if i'm casting it to a more shallow location and dragging back to the boat, i'll shorten it to like 6-8 inches.

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Many of you guys have seen this before, but it's worth posting up.  Explains why/when to use a longer dropper tag:
 

http://www.bassresource.com/fishing/dropshot-bedding-bass.html

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If a multiple hook rig is legal, try stacking 2 drop shot hooks, the lower hook about 8-10" above the weight, the second about 6-8" above the lower hook.

Todays drop shot rig started as a stacking rig, followed by the term down shot used in Japan, now a drop shot rig.

Most anglers only nose hook the worm when drop shotting, try wacky hooking the worm, it's more effective!

Tom

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