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cbruinooge

How fast l can I turn

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This may sound like a really dumb question but I am kinda new to after boats and I have a simple question. I am buying a 17' 6" bass boat that will have a top speed in the low 40's. I have only every driven boats that had very small motors and top speeds of 19. I'm wondering what's the max speed that I can safely turn my boat anywhere from a kind of hard, to a hard turn. I don't want to flip my boat or hurt my family of myself. I plan on mostly fishing but plenty of cruising and just having fun. Thanks in advance guys. 

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I varies depending on the hull design, the only way is with experience and caution. Its a good thing to learn your boats handling capabilities, but you need to be very careful when doing so. Even if the boat will turn on a dime at full throttle, that doesn't mean the passengers will follow, but could easily be launched overboard.

If you haven't taken a boater safety coarse, I suggest starting there.

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1 hour ago, BareHook said:

I varies depending on the hull design, the only way is with experience and caution. Its a good thing to learn your boats handling capabilities, but you need to be very careful when doing so. Even if the boat will turn on a dime at full throttle, that doesn't mean the passengers will follow, but could easily be launched overboard.

If you haven't taken a boater safety coarse, I suggest starting there.

Well Said.

A-Jay

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No one will be able to tell you specifics on a question like this. Its all about on water experience and learning your specific boat and how it handles. Even then daily variables such as wind, waves, etc. would change the answer. Once you get used to the boat and settled in to its operation I'm sure you will know where you feel comfortable in pushing it. If you don't know don't risk over extending your boating capabilities. Better to be safe than sorry.

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I will only add to be conscious of your surroundings and other boat traffic. Boats don't come with brakes 

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I've found driving a boat is very similar to driving a sports car. The more time you spend behind the wheel, the more you feel comfortable pushing the machine you're in control of. Take it slow, see how it reacts to what you do and drive it how you feel comfortable. 

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In addition to the above let me add that water and weather conditions play a major role in boat operation.

A one foot wave hitting your boat as you make a turn can cause havoc.

A two foot wave can bring water into the boat.

A three foot wave, and higher, can flip the boat as you make a turn or throw the trolling motor back at you and your passengers as it tears apart from the bow.

Please take a boating safety course. After all, you can't pull onto the shoulder and step out of the boat if you have a problem.

And if you want to see what a person's head looks like bobbing in the water, take a  volleyball and throw it into the water and see if you can pick it out from 100 feet.

Better to be safe than sorry.

Good luck.

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How about a few more specifics about your boat and engine, 17'"6 cover a wide spectrum of bass boats in both aluminum and fiberglass. 40+ mph would indicate about 75 hp with trim control?

Weight distribution is important with any hull design so the boat planes properly. Go out by yourself and practice driving the new boat. You trim the outboard engine down to get started, this pushes the bow down, then about 15 to 20 mph you slowly trim the engine up to lift the bow and increase speed, no more than 3/4 trim. Your best turning and handling trim is about 1/2 trim up, somewhere around 25 mph should be safe.

As already mentioned learn the rules of safe boating before you run your boat.

Good luck.

Tom

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3 hours ago, Sam said:

In addition to the above let me add that water and weather conditions play a major role in boat operation.

A one foot wave hitting your boat as you make a turn can cause havoc.

A two foot wave can bring water into the boat.

A three foot wave, and higher, can flip the boat as you make a turn or throw the trolling motor back at you and your passengers as it tears apart from the bow.

Please take a boating safety course. After all, you can't pull onto the shoulder and step out of the boat if you have a problem.

And if you want to see what a person's head looks like bobbing in the water, take a  volleyball and throw it into the water and see if you can pick it out from 100 feet.

Better to be safe than sorry.

Good luck.

To that I'll add

Anyone can run a boat in calm, learn to run it in a chop!

In my little pea brain a boat servers two purposes; one it gets me to the fish & two it gets me to safe harbor!

In adverse conditions I have been know to beach a boat & get out!

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On ‎8‎/‎3‎/‎2016 at 6:05 PM, slonezp said:

I will only add to be conscious of your surroundings and other boat traffic. Boats don't come with brakes 

And passengers don't wear seat belts or helmets either

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Someone has said you start with the engine trimmed all the way down and trim up as your boat lift onto plane. When you are driving at speed like say 30 to 40 mph the trim can be your friend, I will tap it down a little when I am coming up on a turn or maybe bouncing from waves. I am not talking bringing it down much but often in rough water or about to make a tight turn I will bounce the trim switch down so I catch the water better and then hit it back up a touch when i am straightening back out. i will do it also if I need to quickly slow down due to something unexpected happening in front of me. It is a good idea to get a ride on your new boat from the seller or dealer. Do not be afraid to tell them you would like them to show you how they operate the  boat and then run it the first time with them. If that is not possible find a local bass club or even a neighbor that owns a bass boat. I know someone that paid for a crab dinner for someone that taught him how to drive his new boat.  No one turns down a good seafood or steak dinner!

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Only experience in YOUR boat will tell you how it will handle. A others have said, there is no way to tell how your passenger(s) will behave if you do a full throttle turn.  I know my flat bottom bass boat will slide hard in the opposite direction of the turn.  So if I were to turn hard to the right to avoid something I will slide to the left, probably right into what I was trying to avoid in the first place.  How do I know this?  By watching how it turns under similar but non-emergency circumstances.

I do not yet know how my new boat will handle under a hard throttle turn but I do know that under moderate throttle it will stay level and try to push everyone, including the driver, to the outside of the turn.  If it is to the left, the driver (me) is pushed into the right gunnel.  But to the right it will try to push me toward the passenger seat and away from the throttle and wheel.  That is in calm water.  I do not yet know what it will do in rough water (chop, waves, etc.).  That is something I need to find out in the near future.  The last thing you want to do is find out how your boat handles in an emergency situation.  It may not do what you expect it to do. 

My point is this...you need to figure out how your boat and you will react to a hard corner in all types of water conditions.

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On 8/3/2016 at 6:49 PM, Sam said:

...if you want to see what a person's head looks like bobbing in the water, take a  volleyball and throw it into the water and see if you can pick it out from 100 feet.

Paint that volleyball black.  Ain't no bright white heads bobbing around on the surface of any lakes I know of.

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go down about 4 rows until you see the unbelievable turn in bass boat.  That's if you know what you are doing.   Then watch the one right after it, that's if you are an idiot.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=bat+turn+in+bass+boat&&view=detail&mid=C93D7B36A3565E3E4DF5C93D7B36A3565E3E4DF5&FORM=VRDGAR

 

 

 

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There's one of a Skeeter doing a 360° turn!

I love today's bass boat! ;)

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