Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
iceintheveins

Favorite Jig Retrieves For Cold Water

Recommended Posts

I was wondering what everyone's favorite jig retrieve is for water in the upper 40s and low 50s, as bass haven't moved up on shallow cover just yet for the most part and thus pitchin/flippin is less effective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Ice, funny you should ask.

 

The "jig bite" is on in Virginia.

 

Please consider the following:

The water is cold. So what are the bass doing?

They are getting ready to fatten up for the spawn. They are staging in one place, waiting for a nice, juicy and BIG meal to float by their face. They are seeking for some warm water. They do not want to move that much in any direction. If they are happy where they are then they will stay in that concise area and not move around.

 

Where are the bass holding?

Under piers, docks and boats. Where the water is a little warmer. Next to rocks and wood that absorb the sun's heat. In brush piles. Sunning themselves along the shoreline. They are just hovering in one place, waiting for your jig.

 

What do they like to eat?

Anything and everything they can inhale. A nice big crawfish moving s-l-o-w-l-y along the bottom is a good target. Something that looks like a jig with a crawfish pig attached.

 

So how do you fish your jig?

Who knows? (OK, the Shadow knows) Sometimes they want the jig worked s-l-o-w with long pauses between moves. Other times the want the jig to move fast.  You cast your jig; let it fall; if no takers let it sit on the bottom for an eternity, like 15-seconds; and then start your retrieve back picturing in your mind how the jig is looking on the bottom to mimic a crawfish or a big bream. And here comes the "magic word".....experiment. Yes, trail and error. Try fast, slow and in-between movements; big hops; small movements; in the underwater structure like a Senko or finesse worm. The bass will tell you what jig movements they want.

 

Do I need to experiment with a variety of sizes and colors?

Of course. A half-ounce blue/black jig with a Zoom blue/black super chunk (037-072) may work. Or a brown and orange skirt with a Zoom "root beer pepper green" super chunk (037-097) may be exactly what they want. Experiment with a variety of jig sizes and pig trailers until you determine the pattern they want.

 

Will nail them right an left with my jig?

Nope. Jig fishing is slow with lots of pitching, flipping and casting. But when you get a hit it will be a bit momma.  And then the real fun starts when you realize you have your "new personal best" on the line, barley hooked and she is swimming like the police are after her. Time for your blood pressure to double.

 

Just remember to experiment. Their are different styles of jig heads to fish different techniques and structure. Learn what each on does, including the swimming jig, and go out whit your arsenal of jigs and throw them all day long.

 

As you realize that jig fishing can be s-l-o-w but very productive you will have more confidence in a jig and pig and have a better idea of when to use them.

 

Good luck and have some fun out there in Colorado.

 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lift the rod slowly until you feel the jig move, then you know you have already moved it too much. Now you are screwed, but you should probably let it sit for 3-5 seconds, lift slowly until you feel it move again. Pause 3-5 seconds. 3-5 seconds is a long time in the fishing world, a super long time, but the wait is the key in cold water.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Drag the jig, pause, and shake your line, this will move the jig in place but not move it forward. Pause it as long as you would a jerkbait in those temperatures.

 

It is best to do this in areas where you are confident that you have your bait in front of a fish!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A bass's metabolism is finally tuned to its circulatory system temperature which is the same as the surrounding water temperature. In cold water their metabolism slows down, their brain slows down, so the bass slows down.

 

The colder the water, the slower the bass's brain operates so the slower you must present the bait or it's gone before the bass's brain tells it to bite.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I either drag it a little at a time, or I move it with short hops. Whichever way I work the bait, I work it slow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Favorite Jig Retrieves For Cold Water ?

 

The one where the jig is actually a deep diving jerkbait.

:smiley:

A-Jay

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was out on Saturday and Sunday. Water temperature was 45 degrees. I was fishing laydowns in 3-4 feet of water. The bass may have moved shallow but you need to figure out what their temperament is each day. On Saturday the bass were hitting the jig on the initial drop. On Sunday the presentation that worked was to pitch the jig into the wood and then just let it sit still for 30 seconds. The bass would pickup the jig off the bottom. All I needed to do was watch the line and then set the hook.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I call it "counting rocks". Drag it slow enough that I can feel every little thing on the bottom. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing forum

    fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×