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How far will a senko sink?

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How far will a senko sink ?

 

how far is the bottom ?

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No question, @WRB.  Tom, I very much value your input here.  My comment about senkos was typed with my tongue firmly planted in my cheek....except the trigging part...I do still do that at times :)

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1 minute ago, Choporoz said:

No question, @WRB.  Tom, I very much value your input here.  My comment about senkos was typed with my tongue firmly planted in my cheek....except the trigging part...I do still do that at times :)

I thought your commit was good and everyone needs to step back and enjoy bass fishing however they want to. Tinkering with tackle and lures is a enjoyable part of fishing. I remember a bass fishing partner 45 years ago rigging a plastic worm wacky style and though that isn't going work but it did!

Tom

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28 minutes ago, WRB said:

The isn't a right or wrong way to bass fish because bass are very forgiving fish that strike a wide variety of lures and live critters, it's what makes our sport so interesting.

When asked I will give you my recommended presentations and techniques based on my experiences that may or may not help you catch bass. I call this sharing information and you can take it or leave it.

Tom

 

And as always you have some good advice. 

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I use a c-rig with a 1/8oz brass bullet weight, with a brass clicker, a 24" leader with the senko rigged in a eagle claw 249w weedless hook wacky rigged( hook is in the middle of the senko so it flaps its ends as it floats down. I'm fishing ten feet of water.

3 hours ago, WRB said:

I thought your commit was good and everyone needs to step back and enjoy bass fishing however they want to. Tinkering with tackle and lures is a enjoyable part of fishing. I remember a bass fishing partner 45 years ago rigging a plastic worm wacky style and though that isn't going work but it did!

Tom

Remember in the 70's it was the split shot rig? We pulled some nice sized bass out of the weeds back then.

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Had mentioned in another topic about a friend's little girl fishing with us using a plastic worm gobbed live bait style.  She caught fish! Sometimes I think we overthink.  (BTW I fish senkos T-rigged w/bullet weight also.)

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3 hours ago, Comfortably Numb said:

I use these for deeper suspended bass.

 

Lake Fork Tackle

 

 

wacky weight.jpg

That's pretty nice. I have never seen that before 

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On 10/10/2017 at 7:18 PM, Fishing Rhino said:

Methinks the deeper it goes, the faster it will fall.  How do I reach that conclusion?  It's really quite simple.  

 

Water pressure increases with depth.  Water pressure will compress the senko, reducing resistance and drag.  Ergo, because the bait is smaller due to water pressure while the mass is unchanged, therefore, it will fall faster.

 

Of course, we will have to take into account that the deeper it goes the more line it has to "drag" to the bottom.

 

Does the compression of the senko offset the added drag of the line?  I don't know.  You'll have to ask someone smarter than me.

 

Pardon my silliness, I've been up too long.  Left the house at three-thirty this morning and just got home.  A long day on the water will do that to me.

 

Edit:  Does anyone know if a senko will sink in salt water?  I've really got to shower and go to bed.

I like your thnking but I think it would fall slower the deeper it went.  If an increase in water pressure increases bouyant force then we would expect the senko sink more slowly as it reaches extreme depth, possibly even becoming neutrally bouyant.  

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1 hour ago, BaitFinesse said:

I like your thnking but I think it would fall slower the deeper it went.  If an increase in water pressure increases bouyant force then we would expect the senko sink more slowly as it reaches extreme depth, possibly even becoming neutrally bouyant.  

That would be correct if, and only if, water pressure was only applied to the bottom.  But, you are on to something.  Water pressure is generally equally distributed on the surface of an object that is immersed in water.

 

However, since the object is three dimensional, there will be more force exerted on the deepest parts of an object.  Side pressure is neutral.  But, since the bottom of the plastic bait is slightly deeper than the top of the bait a greater force will act on the bottom.

 

Think of a piece of wood floating on the surface, there is no downward force from the water on the top of the block of wood.  But once an object sinks, that changes.

 

"

What does buoyant force mean?

Have you ever dropped your swimming goggles in the deepest part of the pool and tried to swim down to get them? It can be frustrating because the water tries to push you back up to the surface as you're swimming downward. The name of this upward force exerted on objects submerged in fluids is called the buoyant force.
So why do fluids exert an upward buoyant force on submerged objects? It has to do with differences in pressure between the bottom of the submerged object and the top. Say someone dropped a can of beans in a pool of water. 
 
6d98f1f626b2ef5a7663de50ecc98bf3fa8dc990.png
Because pressure (P_{gauge}=\rho gh)(Pgauge=ρgh)left parenthesis, P, start subscript, g, a, u, g, e, end subscript, equals, rho, g, h, right parenthesis increases as you go deeper in a fluid, the force from pressure exerted downward on the top of the can of beans will be less than the force from pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the can.
Essentially it's that simple. The reason there's a buoyant force is because of the rather unavoidable fact that the bottom (i.e. more submerged part) of an object is always deeper in a fluid than the top of the object. This means the upward force from water has to be greater than the downward force from water.
F=PAF, equals, P, A
43a19ca25476ca65b19239d32f640ba208317593
 
Knowing conceptually why there should be a buoyant force is good, but we should also be able to figure out how to determine the exact size of the buoyant force as well.
We can start with the fact that the water on the top of the can is pushing down F_{down}FdownF, start subscript, d, o, w, n, end subscript, and the water on the bottom of the can is pushing up F_{up}FupF, start subscript, u, p, end subscript. We can find the total upward force on the can exerted by water pressure (which we call the buoyant force F_{buoyant}FbuoyantF, start subscript, b, u, o, y, a, n, t, end subscript) by simply taking the difference between the magnitudes of the upward force F_{up}FupF, start subscript, u, p, end subscriptand downward force F_{down}FdownF, start subscript, d, o, w, n, end subscript."
 

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I somewhat disagree with the swimmer in the pool example.  What does a swimmer do just before diving for an object on the bottom of a pool?  He takes a deep breath and becomes buoyant, or more buoyant.  Water resists the movement of any object.  

 

Ever float on the water and exhale?  What happens?  You begin to sink.  Take a breath before your nose and mouth are beneath the surface, and your body will float higher.  Many drown because of panic.  They start screaming and thrashing around which depletes the amount of air in the lungs, and they sink.  If they'd just relax and take a deep breath, they would stay at the surface.  Exhale quickly and take a deep breath.  Then hold it for a bit.  Then repeat the exhaling, inhaling technique.

 

Keep your lungs inflated and you'll float.  Cause your lungs to contract by expelling the air, and you'll sink.  People with less body fat may have trouble floating because muscle is more dense than fat.

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1 minute ago, Fishing Rhino said:

I somewhat disagree with the swimmer in the pool example.  What does a swimmer do just before diving for an object on the bottom of a pool?  He takes a deep breath and becomes buoyant, or more buoyant.  Water resists the movement of any object.  

 

Ever float on the water and exhale?  What happens?  You begin to sink.  Take a breath before your nose and mouth are beneath the surface, and your body will float higher.  Many drown because of panic.  They start screaming and thrashing around which depletes the amount of air in the lungs, and they sink.  If they'd just relax and take a deep breath, they would stay at the surface.  Exhale quickly and take a deep breath.  Then hold it for a bit.  Then repeat the exhaling, inhaling technique.

 

Keep your lungs inflated and you'll float.  Cause your lungs to contract by expelling the air, and you'll sink.  People with less body fat may have trouble floating because muscle is more dense than fat.

So your saying stay fat and float ? Hah

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The small increase in water density on the bottom of the ocean would increase bouant force but the same pressure that brought the increase in density would compress the senko, reducing surface area and bouant force.  Neat thought exercise.  This has been a fun topic

 

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6 hours ago, Ksam1234 said:

So your saying stay fat and float ? Hah

Yes, less fat requires more work to stay afloat.

 

".........

If an object has a greater density than water, it sinks. If it is less dense than water, it floats. Which type of body material—muscle or fat—had greater density than water and which had a lower density?

 

So, as it turns out, athletes with very little body fat might have to work harder to stay afloat in the water. To be healthy, our bodies need a balance of fat and muscle."

 

 

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/muscle-versus-fat/

 

The size of the lungs is also a factor.

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Dang! After three years back in the sport, I just purchased my first three bags of 5” Yamasenko worms to try as the waters here in Massachusetts cool down. Not even sure if they’ll be a good fall fishing bait. Didn’t realize I’d need an engineering degree to use ‘em.  I was just gonna start with a T-rig and mebbe a 1/0 wacky rig and see what happens. Now I gotta buy a scientific calculator?  Sheesh!  (Seriously - I think one of the best things about these forums is the wealth of info shared by you guys ... but at my skill level I’m afraid I’m gonna just heave ‘em out there and see what happens.)

  • Haha 3

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