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51 minutes ago, ClackerBuzz said:

also focus on keeping ur elbows close to ur body while casting.  it tremendously helps mechanics and cuts down on injuries.  not allowed to post the vid but google: KVD’s Secrets to Power Fishing Spinnerbaits.  he casts 3-4 times in the video and his elbows are always tight to his body.  Most guys try to use their arms/shoulders/elbows/wrists too much instead of allowing the rod to do its job.

When I was learning to cast a baitcaster I watched a bunch of videos. In one the instructor took his wallet out of his back pocket and placed it in the armpit of his casting arm. He stressed keeping your arms/elbows close to your body when casting overhand, and if the wallet fell to the ground during the cast it showed you weren't using proper casting form.

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4 minutes ago, Steveo-1969 said:

When I was learning to cast a baitcaster I watched a bunch of videos. In one the instructor took his wallet out of his back pocket and placed it in the armpit of his casting arm. He stressed keeping your arms/elbows close to your body when casting overhand, and if the wallet fell to the ground during the cast it showed you weren't using proper casting form.

 

I have my students roll up a section of newspaper about 2" in diameter, once you loose the newspaper you'll normally move your elbow closer to your side. 

 

I see a lot of newbies with elbows shoulder high!

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Getting used to properly loading a fly rod has helped me a lot with understanding how a rod loads and the dynamics of casting in general, regardless of what kind of gear I have with me that day.  A heavy 8wt fly rod, for me, is by far the most exhausting because my technique is still nowhere near as good as it is with conventional tackle.  Still, if you think about it, regardless of tackle, the more work you can get the rod to do, the less you have to.  Part of my goals for this year is improving my casting.  Part of that, for me, is mechanics/technique, and another big part is cast selection.  For example, while I think the two handed overhead cast is better than the one handed overhead cast for maximizing distance and throwing heavy baits, I'm going to prefer a roll cast (with casting gear) most of the time because I can do it with less fatigue, with better accuracy, and smaller splash regardless of whether I'm using one hand for something close, or two hands for heavier lures or more distance.  This whole efficiency thing, for me, is huge because it minimizes the effects my back and neck have on my fishing over the course of a day and whether I'm good for a weekend or seized up in spasms after 4 hours.

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I agree with everything that is being said. I think a lot of us ( myself included ) use more effort then necessary when casting because when we started we had no one to show us different. Once we develop bad habits their hard to break, (for me any way.) 

When I took up fly fishing in the 60's I was self taught, all out of a book, and later on I had an awful time improving, breaking bad habits. Everyone has different ideas of perfection, for me it's someone really good with a fly rod. A perfect fly cast is grace and beauty in motion, a wonderful thing to watch. I couldn't do it very often, but when I did, I knew it, and was amazed how little effort it took. 

 With conventional fishing, same thing. Rods today have actions and materials that can make casting so much easier, with so much less effort. The hard part ( again, for me any ways ) is knowing how to utilize this to the fullest, to get the maximum results with the least effort. 

                                                   Jim

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Started out fishing saltwater from the shore/piers and always required two hands when casting to achieve the distance I wanted and avoid smacking bystanders in the head with large chunks of lead. Habit stuck with me going to freshwater. Even if it’s a really short cast, I always have two hands on the rod (spinning or casting).

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My favorite (and most hated answer)...

 

Depends.

 

Depends on rod action.

Depends on lure weight.

Depends on technique (deep cranking, skipping docks, flipping, punching etc)

 

Depends.

 

I've had 4 rotator cuff repair on my dominant arm. Plus elbow and wrist work. (Fell on a whirley crane).

 

IMHO, you can't have one cast. That'd be like a mechanic with one wrench.

 

Pre-activity preparation solves most activity related pain. Footballers don't just walk on the field. They lift, run and stretch before every game.

 

Why would fishing be different?

 

Despite all the "body work", I fish tourneys and my arms never hurt because I target my exercise specifically to fish.

 

Good luck and Catchemall!!!

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6 hours ago, uncustered said:

 

Depends on rod action.

Depends on lure weight.

Depends on technique (deep cranking, skipping docks, flipping, punching etc)

Most lures I use one hand  . Larger lures  two hands .  

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The "guy" in the article is John Crews.

 

Check him out on the Internet.

 

Two things to add to the conversation:

1.  After making your cast, have the reel in your hand facing toward the sky.

2.  Be sure to include your "magnets" when setting up your baitcaster for each bait you throw.

 

For long casts, I use both hands as John Crews has suggested.

 

For shorter casts I let the rod do the work.

 

Sam

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Use 2 handed cast all the time but I also do a lot of bombing frogs out over big mats.  If I'm in close, chances are I'm using a spinning rod or a sidearm cast or a flip

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Watch Bjorn Borg's backhand, (seriously), most would say its a 2 handed BH, but he mostly hit it one handed using the off hand to support and or guide the backswing in varying degrees situationally, mostly generating racket speed from hip and shoulder rotation. (and the foot work among the best ever). Same applies to casting.

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It seems like everyone has their own unique style of handling a fishing rod. Somewhat like no 2 baseball plyers swing or pitch exactly the same.  I guess it comes down to whatever works for you.  If there's one thing, I would say the motion needs to be smooth and not jerky.   It amazes me when I see pros pitch with their winding hand and then change hands but it has obviously worked well enough for them.

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Spinning reels hanged down on the underside of the rod seat, the rods guides are also on the underside. Nearly everyone knows how to hold and cast a spinning outfit and keep the reel downward, it balances that way.

Baitcasting reels are mounted on the topside of the rod and the rods giudes are also on the topside. Now comes the $64,000 question; where should the reel be positioned during the cast?

If you hold your casting hand with the palm downward and thumb pointing towards your side the casting motion doesn't twist your elbow. Holding your pal towards your side and thumb upright at 12 o'clock the casting motion will cause you to twist your elbow straining tendons. The thumb up casting position keeps the reel and rod upright at 12 o'clock, the line going though the guides can contact the rod blank slowing the line.

Answer to the $64,000 question; the reel handles should be at 12 o'clock for right handed or 6 o'clock for left hand,  your thumb pointing towards your side, the rod guides rotated 90 degrees from 12 o'clock, the line doesn't contact the rod blank and you don't stress your elbow tendons.

1 hand casting for everything except big swimbaits and crankbait that  2 hands help to excellerate and control the long rods for extra distance by extending your arms.

Tom

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Whatever it takes to accomplish the task at hand is how I approach this. From dropping a jighead straight down to suspending fish, to casting a spinnerbait a country mile with the wind at your back. Im sure we all have our own ways.

 Me? I try to be quiet when I need to. And make a slight racket, when the situation calls for that as well.

  He, he he, Knowing the difference? priceless.

 I mean of course the lures entry into the water,  (cuz that "IS" important in any cast).... As for the mechanics of casting? Oh yeah,...

 With all the different ways to cast, you kinda need to be a maestro of sorts, sometimes waiving that wand/rod like an artist, smoothly and effortlessly hitting every note, beat, and changeup.. (like casting a jerkbait to visible cover)  Something no machine could ever duplicate. Then other times mimicking a machine to the "T". Methodically, repeating the same exact motion over, and over, all day long. (like flipping)

   My casting styles may not work for you, and vice versa.  A technical approach "usually" will work for some, like: hand positioning, rod angle, etc. and yes these will help. but the only true way to answer the casting mechanics questions? Is to be out there casting away, finding what works for you. rod strengths, line, and lure weights, can be exactly the same, but like dna we all differ.

 OK,. no more soapbox, today,... good to back online tho

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Man, I did some lawn casting with my wallet between my arm and side and it was hard as hell to cast that way.  I know I have short arms (or so my tailor tells me), but the rod butt gets in the way with all but the shortest ones.  

 

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Man, I did some lawn casting with my wallet between my arm and side and it was hard as hell to cast that way.  I know I have short arms (or so my tailor tells me), but the rod butt gets in the way with all but the shortest ones.  

 

Let me guess? you read this wallet thing was good on the InterWeb®. Stop that!

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Let me guess? you read this wallet thing was good on the InterWeb®. Stop that!

This very thread in fact!  It's s similar idea that also applied to sport shooting, keeping your arms close in and not "chicken winging".  

 

Yard casting is all I got going on right now, so anything is worth trying for half an hour. I am going to go practice casting at a frozen river later for some real excitement.  

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This very thread in fact!    

Dennis Miller moment...

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This very thread in fact!  It's s similar idea that also applied to sport shooting, keeping your arms close in and not "chicken winging".  

 

Yard casting is all I got going on right now, so anything is worth trying for half an hour. I am going to go practice casting at a frozen river later for some real excitement.  

I expect to see those photos on Facebook with some sort of cynical captioning attached.  Something like "This is the recommended form for casting on hard water." :D

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I also did a lot of salt water casting with heavy weight when I was young , so any lure that's heavy , or a heavier combo gets thrown with 2 hands. If it's a lighter bait on a lighter combo , I usually use one hand. For me , the one- hand motion is similar to when I threw a curveball in baseball. I dont use baitcasting as much as spinning though ,because I broke my right thumb near the wrist when I was 19. With 2 hands or one , I get a lot of pain with the wrist torque involved with bait casters. So I mostly use spinning , which I can do all day with no pain.

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The OP was discussing over hand casting with a bait casting reel.

Flipping, pitching, roll cast, side arm, back hand, short casts, spinning and spin cast  wasn't the topic.

My point is about hand position in lieu of arm motion because hand position affect arm motion.

Why so many of today bass anglers cast with their thumb upright on the spool maybe do to learning to cast with a spin cast reel. Whatever the reasons correcting your hand position will improve your casting and reduce the stress on your elbow tendons.

Tom

 

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I always do a lot of lever casts when casting overhand. But i also like to throw a lot of back handed casts and side casts. I mix it up pretty regularly so I rarely experience any fatigue or issues.

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On 1/9/2018 at 4:26 PM, WRB said:

 

Baitcasting reel should have the handles at 12 o'clock during the casting motion...

 

Why? Because the handle somehow gets in your way when horizontal?

Offhand, it seems to me the best position for casting distance would be whatever handle position brings the line guide to the central position on the worm gear, so there is the least extreme angle from the edge of the spool. I can't say I'm sure of that, however.

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3 minutes ago, hawgenvy said:

Why? Because the handle somehow gets in your way when horizontal?

Offhand, it seems to me the best position for casting distance would be whatever handle position brings the line guide to the central position on the worm gear, so there is the least extreme angle from the edge of the spool. I can't say I'm sure of that, however.

Pick up your casting rod with baitcasting reel and try both casting motions, it will be obvious.

Tom

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Will do, Tom, thanks.

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On 1/10/2018 at 6:47 AM, Pro Logcatcher said:

I have always used two hands when casting with a baitcaster except when I'm pitching or flipping.

Same here. Trying to cast one handed just feels awkward to me! There's no way I could use a pistol grip rod! 

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