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I am considering getting a Diawa reel with the sv spool technology. I am interested in a more forgiving reel for skipping and lighter weight bait applications. I am curious if spending the money on Tatula Sv or the new Zillion is that much better than other mid to high end reel manufacturers. I have plenty of Lew's and Abu Garcia reels, but they are a headache once I start trying skip.  Will I be blown away by the mentioned Diawa models performance or would I be better served just trying to better train my thumb while skipping.

 

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The sv spool certainly will make it easier but it’s not magic. You still have to learn the proper technique for angle and speed. It will help ease the learning curve though. Tatula sv would be a fine reel to start out with. 

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I agree that there's no magic pill to make skipping with a casting reel trouble free. Everyone has their own setup and preferences. I'd practice with what you have. Buying any reel just to make skipping easier will lead to disappointment. Unless of course you need an excuse to buy another reel. 

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Agree with DVT practice with what you have....

The only reel that prevents backlashes is a spinning reel.

Tom

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The SV spools blew me away when I started skipping with them.  The night and day difference between the SV and my BPS PQ was an eye opener.  The light weight SV spool was so much more controlled than the heavy dual brake spool on the PQ even with the SV spool tension set so loose as to have side to side play.  My 1st SV spool reel wasn't even close to being like anything I have used to skip before.   I regularly skip wacky senkos thumb free under docks with my Alphas SV.

 

I've heard the Zillion SV spool being described as a longer casting SV spool which I take to mean that it is less controlled at low speed and would not be my 1st choice for a dedicated skipping reel.  The more the 'choked off' the SV spool the better skipper I have found.  The SS SV, SV103, Alphas SV and Tatula SV would be better options imo.

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I bought an Alphas SV105 and read that it makes skipping easier.  I tried it, and now I skip baits under docks, branches, and many other low-hanging obstructions...with my spinning reel.  I had at least some backlash every time I tried it.  The SV spool in no way makes skipping automatic.  But with time and practice, I'm sure it will make it easier.

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Also, think about line, I am trying to get skipping down with baitcaster and use mono which is more forgiving during learning curve.

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Yea, I find it far easier to skip with my sv105 vs other reels I have tried.  I am still awful at it, but with the Alphas I get a bunch of loose coils, with my other reels I get a proper backlash.  I also found that a slightly "softer then Fast" rod was really helpful as well, in my case a Regular-Fast jdm rod. 

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Suggestion:

 

While trying to learn how to better skip your bait with a baitcaster, go outside and cast your bait about 30 to 40 feet.

 

Then take Scotch Tape and put a few pieces across the remaining line on the spool.

 

Your backlashes will go only as far as the Scotch Tape.

 

Experiment as you may want to put the tape on the spool after 15 to 20 feet.

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Just watch a MLB elimination round where Mark Davis and Terry Scrogens place 1 & 2 skipping docks.Mark is known for his crankbait skills and one of the best casters in the pro fishing. Terry is known as "big fish" and known for his heavy cover casting skills.

Both these angler used spinning tackle to skip docks and so did Dean Rojos who placed 4th. Rods and reels are tools to perform a task, why try to force a baitcasting reel to do something it isn't designed to do?

I agree Daiwa has some excellent baitcasting reels and I use them and a well tuned reel is a pleasure to use but there are limits to what it can do.

Tom

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Please explain WHY it isn’t designed for that? Nowhere on earth has it ever said a casting reel isn’t designed for skipping. If I’m skipping a frog under docks I would need a stout spinning rod to handle that weight. You picked 3 examples and my guess is they were skipping lighter baits. Thus the spinning rods. I know for a fact Dean skips baits with a casting reel.  What about the other 500 pros who use a casting rod? I guess that means they’re doing it all wrong since it’s not designed for that. They’re tools as you said and at certain times you use a different tool. That’s Dean in the video. 

 

 

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The SV makes light lures, skipping and finesse jigs silly easy. I've posted numerous times on here about how surprising it was. The Tatula SV is silly cheap on eBay right now, spring for one!

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When the lure hits the water it slows downs faster then the baitcasters spool. Skipping 1/2 oz jigs or any lure that will skip can be skipped with a bait casting reel do to it's weight. 1/4 oz or litgher becomes difficult.

Watch MLF they were skipping wacky rigged 6" Ochos. If these pro's could have used a baitcaster they would have.

My point you can't backlash a spinning reel so it's easier to skip with and more efficient. You can do it with a baitcaster however it's challenging.

Tom

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Earlier last year I bought Tatula CT just to learn how to skip now I can skip with any baitcaster reel including curado 70 which is very finicky and easier to backlash.

But WRB is right I wouldn't skip anything 1/4oz or under at least weightless Fluke and Senko. The heavier the lure the easier to skip.

Is SV is easier to skip? I would say YES. Because I can only do backhand skipping with my SV105.

 

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Just a thought. I know there is some casting reels are what real men use prejudice...but have you ever thought that maybe a spinning reel for that app might work pretty well? Guys like Guido Hibdon managed to get by. Then again they were all about catching fish more than selling high priced tackle. 

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45 minutes ago, HookRz said:

Just a thought. I know there is some casting reels are what real men use prejudice...but have you ever thought that maybe a spinning reel for that app might work pretty well? Guys like Guido Hibdon managed to get by. Then again they were all about catching fish more than selling high priced tackle. 

On light baits spinning is way easier and used by most, but you will have a hard time skipping a 1/2oz jig on a spinning rod. With x plastic trailer it’s too heavy for it. Unless you have a heavy power spinning rod and that goes against what most people are using a spinning rod for in bass fishing. You think is BP is skipping a jig in the elite series with a casting reel he’s doing it to push high priced tackle? No, he’s doing it because it’s the proper tool for the job. Aside from lighter baits you will see the pros and others using casting gear. Why, because it’s the right tool. That’s what Tom didn’t mention is his statement above. He just went ahead and said that it wasn’t designed for that. That’s totally false. He then back pedaled a bit and said lighter baits, in which he would be correct. Search the web and see how many videos you see of pros using a spinning rod to skip a frog or a jig with. I’ll bet dollars to donuts it’s hardly any. Those guys are out to catch fish and cash a check to earn a living. If there was a better choice then that’s what they’d be using to do it with. 

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5 hours ago, rippin-lips said:

On light baits spinning is way easier and used by most, but you will have a hard time skipping a 1/2oz jig on a spinning rod. With x plastic trailer it’s too heavy for it. Unless you have a heavy power spinning rod and that goes against what most people are using a spinning rod for in bass fishing. You think is BP is skipping a jig in the elite series with a casting reel he’s doing it to push high priced tackle? No, he’s doing it because it’s the proper tool for the job. Aside from lighter baits you will see the pros and others using casting gear. Why, because it’s the right tool. That’s what Tom didn’t mention is his statement above. He just went ahead and said that it wasn’t designed for that. That’s totally false. He then back pedaled a bit and said lighter baits, in which he would be correct. Search the web and see how many videos you see of pros using a spinning rod to skip a frog or a jig with. I’ll bet dollars to donuts it’s hardly any. Those guys are out to catch fish and cash a check to earn a living. If there was a better choice then that’s what they’d be using to do it with. 

Every pro is selling something. It's their job. It's why they dress in advertising. But I agree Casting tackle is best for skipping a 1/2 ounce jig on days that fish absolutely refuse to eat quarter ounce tube. 

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