Jump to content
el Largo

Magnetic (Daiwa Tatula SV TWS) vs centrifugal (Shimano Curado 200K) brakes

Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, Mjmj said:

Curado's have the break adjustment on the inside and outside the side plate. No need to remove the sideplate for adjustment s after it's set up. 

That's just plain inaccurate. The centrifugal brakes work with the magnetic brakes, they both could need adjustment at any given time. If you only needed one centrifugal brake setting you would only have one brake setting, not 4. Different lures fly through the air differently. What works for a big, fat crankbait may be miles away from what's needed for a slim swimbait kn a darter, for example. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is my two cents. As many know from my previous posts I had a friend lend me a Daiwa several years ago and I sold off most of my 12 baitcasters in favor of Daiwa Exceler,( predecessor to the Fuego CT) Tatula, Tatula Type Rs and Tatula CTs reels.   The reels I had included some Curados, Chronarchs. They were good reels, but after fishing the Daiwas I preferred the Tatulas.  I have tested some friends of mine's Shimano MGL and new Curado Ks.

I would not trade one of my Daiwas for any of them at all. 

 Everyone has fixated on the Tatula SV as the only Daiwa to consider.

Now the Tatula SV is a specialized version of the Tatula CT family. It has a special SV spool and a different set of flyweights than a normal Tatula CT. It carries less line as well, but its claim to fame is its ability to skip and handle light lures. I am not saying it can't handle heavier lures, but it designed to do those tasks best.  If I was buying my first all purpose reel or a reel that will do other duties most of the time, then the Tatula CT or a Daiwa Fuego in a 6.3-1 or 7.3-1 would be my best choice.  Proper adjustments are important to every reel but these Daiwa reels adjust very easily BUT not the same as any other reel out there. I have been using baitcasters for over 40 years so I have used a bunch of different ones. I have taught a dozen or so other anglers how to adjust the Diawas as well as their own reels from several fishing boards.  I will once again post these two videos. The first explains how the Daiwa MagForce breaks work and the second one shows Brett Ehler explaining how to properly set up a Tatula SV reel. All the entire Tatula  family of reels and the Fuego CT reels adjust exactly the same. I almost never change my exterior magnetic dial even if I change baits of different weights.  Never adjust the reel for a "slow steady falling bait " like others. It will disappoint you for sure.

 

 

I hope that explains things a little bit more accurately.  I am a homer and I admit it, but these reels are workhorses and easy to use. One thing I will say for best distance I find these reels respond best to a nice steady cast not a hard jerky casting stroke. Good luck making your decision, there really not many bad reels out there in the top brands.

  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Beetlebz said:

That's just plain inaccurate. The centrifugal brakes work with the magnetic brakes, they both could need adjustment at any given time. If you only needed one centrifugal brake setting you would only have one brake setting, not 4. Different lures fly through the air differently. What works for a big, fat crankbait may be miles away from what's needed for a slim swimbait kn a darter, for example. 

Curado’s don’t have magnetic brakes, they meant small adjustments like wind for the external dial. Most people won’t adjust their spool tension and brakes for every lure change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a really thorough comparison between the two reels- thanks!  I actually checked out both in person today and  preferred the Daiwa, but didn't make a purchase because they didn't have a right-handed reel.  My "testing" was limited only to holding them and trying them on the rod, so I did't make any casts.  That being said, the Daiwa was a little lighter, seemed more intuitive to use and I think are better to learn from.  I'm also going to be using lighter crankbaits so the salesman said the Daiwa would be a better fit for me.  

 

Anybody have any experience using Sunline Shooter Defier?  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Conclusion of the matter and the bottom line.... shimano is better:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey look, another LgMouthGambler. 

  • Haha 2
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, TylerT123 said:

Curado’s don’t have magnetic brakes, they meant small adjustments like wind for the external dial. Most people won’t adjust their spool tension and brakes for every lure change.

The curado DC, yes. I agree with you, most people dont and that's ok! But one brake setting isnt going to be optimal for every bait is all I'm saying. Of course I'm referring to traditional combo brakes, not the DC. The DC just electro-mechanically does what the daiwa does magnetically. 

 

For what it's worth when I ran reels with traditional combination brakes I often didn't change my brakes every time I swapped baits either.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

centrifugal brakes are better! Magnetic brakes are better!! 

Its prefrance try both see what works best for you and use that. Use both if you want. I started fishing with the pinnacle enertia loved that reel fished lews they were ok fished shimano and I found what I liked it could be the opposite for anyone got to try em to see what you like better for what your gonna be doing.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own and fish both.  My personal preference is Shimano.  I know it seems easier to fix the magnetic breaks on the outside of a Daiwa but I think the system is more finicky.  With most of the Shimano I own, I set the breaks with two or three on, and that's it.  With Daiwas, I can be fine for about 10-15 casts then I get a cast, for no apart reason, that backlashes.   Now with that said, I still think most Daiwas are great and would love a new Zillion.   

 

Two things I do think about when this discussion comes up in my head.... 1.  Will the magnets on my Daiwa reels wear out it in time (loose their magnetism)?  2. When Shimano breaks wear out they can be replaced and they are a pain to replace. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, FishTank said:

 I know it seems easier to fix the magnetic breaks on the outside of a Daiwa but I think the system is more finicky.  With most of the Shimano I own, I set the breaks with two or three on, and that's it.  With Daiwas, I can be fine for about 10-15 casts then I get a cast, for no apart reason, that backlashes.

The simplicity of this makes a lot of sense and is really appealing.  Would someone using a baitcasting reel for the first time set the Shimano (is it a Curado 200K?) brakes to 2 or 3 if he's throwing 3/8 or 1/4 crankbaits?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, el Largo said:

The simplicity of this makes a lot of sense and is really appealing.  Would someone using a baitcasting reel for the first time set the Shimano (is it a Curado 200K?) brakes to 2 or 3 if he's throwing 3/8 or 1/4 crankbaits?

3 or 4 is fine you can lower them to 2 when your more comfortable but when it’s windy 4 is optimal for 1/4 to 3/8 ounce backlash free 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FishTank said:

 

Two things I do think about when this discussion comes up in my head.... 1.  Will the magnets on my Daiwa reels wear out it in time (loose their magnetism)?  2. When Shimano breaks wear out they can be replaced and they are a pain to replace. 

Nah, magnetic brakes don’t wear out.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two  reels I have been using since the nineties and their magnets are fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, fishnkamp said:

I have two  reels I have been using since the nineties and their magnets are fine.

Actually a little sarcasm on my part.....Depending on how much heat is applied and what type they are, I think they could last 100-500 years.   Someone much smarter than me could probably figure this out. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The magnets will almost never wear out but they will on occasion break loose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, FishTank said:

 2. When Shimano breaks wear out they can be replaced and they are a pain to replace. 

Nah the brake shoes are very durable probably be years before you have to replace them and they are very cheap and easy to replace. 

 This is really just starting to seem like a big diawa shimano debate and I’m personally sick of theses debates I’m out!!!!!

9F18951A-1C2D-448A-A6A3-822FC6A9AC4F.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have multiple Tatula SVs and multiple Curados (70 and K). Both braking systems on those reels work exceptionally well. 

 

No matter what reel you have, you will quickly adapt to prevent backlashes. More than likely, the first time you cast into a light wind, you will get a good backlash. Not because of bad brakes, but because you didn’t realize such a light wind can catch a bulky crankbait so easily.

 

Since you plan on this being a reel for cranking this setup will likely be more of a casting setup so a super advanced breaking system won’t really be necessary.

 

I am guessing that you are building a shallow crankbait setup since you are pairing the reel with a 705CB?

 

I paired a Curado 70 with my 705CB and it balances perfectly.

 

I use the Tatula SV’s on my T-rig and jig setups.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dirtyeggroll said:

I am guessing that you are building a shallow crankbait setup since you are pairing the reel with a 705CB?

Yes, that's correct. What's the big difference between the Curado 70 and the K?

1 hour ago, Burrows said:

 This is really just starting to seem like a big diawa shimano debate

Sorry- my initial inquiry focused on why Shimano Curado K reels have fewer backlashes with centrifugal brakes than the Daiwa Tatula SV with its magnetic brakes, especially since magnetic brakes have a reputation for less backlashing.  I think it just comes down to experience/practice and matching up the right reel with the right lure, as well as line and rod. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, el Largo said:

This is a really thorough comparison between the two reels- thanks!  I actually checked out both in person today and  preferred the Daiwa, but didn't make a purchase because they didn't have a right-handed reel.  My "testing" was limited only to holding them and trying them on the rod, so I did't make any casts.  That being said, the Daiwa was a little lighter, seemed more intuitive to use and I think are better to learn from.  I'm also going to be using lighter crankbaits so the salesman said the Daiwa would be a better fit for me.  

 

Anybody have any experience using Sunline Shooter Defier?  

 

Have 5-6 reels spooled up with it...crankbait and topwater.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, FishTank said:

Two things I do think about when this discussion comes up in my head.... 1.  Will the magnets on my Daiwa reels wear out it in time (loose their magnetism)?  2. When Shimano breaks wear out they can be replaced and they are a pain to replace. 

The thing I think about when these discussion's come up in my head... Will the reel last until I am tired of it and want to move on to a new one? Since I like to buy new reels every season or two the answer always seems to be yes.

 

I have a few favorite reels (Shimano Symetre, Pflueger Supreme, etc.) that have lasted years with proper maintenance and not fishing them every outing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both systems work fine, but with ANY reel, you have to develop a modicum of technique.  You acquire this skill through practice, and when you're learning, you will backlash.  I don't find that either system is better or worse, just different.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, el Largo said:

Yes, that's correct. What's the big difference between the Curado 70 and the K?

Sorry- my initial inquiry focused on why Shimano Curado K reels have fewer backlashes with centrifugal brakes than the Daiwa Tatula SV with its magnetic brakes, especially since magnetic brakes have a reputation for less backlashing.  I think it just comes down to experience/practice and matching up the right reel with the right lure, as well as line and rod. 

The Curado 70 is smaller. Need less line to spool it and easier to palm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A proficient caster will do well with any reel he or she chooses... pick the one that's your favorite color and practice practice practice 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, el Largo said:

my initial inquiry focused on why Shimano Curado K reels have fewer backlashes with centrifugal brakes than the Daiwa Tatula SV with its magnetic brakes

They don't.  It is much, much more difficult to backlash an SV reel compared to an centrifugal SVS Shimano.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, BaitFinesse said:

 It is much, much more difficult to backlash an SV reel compared to an centrifugal SVS Shimano.

Thanks- but why is that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    bass fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing rods

    fishing rods


    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    bass fish

    fishing poles

    Truck Caps

    fishing reels
    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×