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I've got a 6:3:1 Ratio Baitcaster and wondering if I should invest in an 8:3:1 Other than wanting one is there any reason why I would need one?

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I have a Fuego in 8:1 ratio. I find it easier to slow down with a high gear ratio than speed up with a slow gear ratio. Mainly for frogging and pitching. 

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The bait monkey says so. Good enough reason for me!

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I've got a couple of 8 speed reels (35 ipt) that I mainly use for jigs, worms, lizards, etc.  You can use them for anything you like but something like a big blade spinner bait or magnum crankbait, and you will notice the difference in strain required to turn the handle.

 

To answer your question, yes, yes you should own at least one very fast reel.

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Fast reels are for baits where you impart the action with the rod...or it happens on the fall.

 

Slow reels are for baits that the action comes from reeling them in.

 

Learning that made it pretty easy for me to decide what I "needed".

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Fast reels are great for fishing plastics and jigs.  Gets them back quickly.  I have two Curado K 8.5:1 and love them.

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All but my deep cranking reel are 8 ratios. You can always slow down easily.

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Just ordered a Fuego CT off of eBay for 53 bucks😀

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2 hours ago, DINK WHISPERER said:

All but my deep cranking reel are 8 ratios. You can always slow down easily.

You can...but I use a 6.3:1 for inline spinners (#5 Mepps).  It's just easier, and I through that bait all the time up here.

 

I tried it on my 7:1, and on a 9:1 Rocket...it was a PITA to remember to slow down.

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I wasnt dead set I ever needed a 8:1 or even 7:1, I still don’t think you “need” em. But I purchased a 8:1 Fuego and I love it. The extra speed to take up line when jig fishing or frog fishing is something I’m glad I have at this point. I’d love to buy more. 

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On 9/14/2018 at 10:29 AM, Buffdaddy54 said:

I've got a 6:3:1 Ratio Baitcaster and wondering if I should invest in an 8:3:1 Other than wanting one is there any reason why I would need one?

thanks

What kind of a silly question is that ? of course you should !

 

a couple of decades ago I made myself the same question, got me a Daiwa PT33SH, the fastest reel back then, 7.1:1 gear ratio and 33" IPT, other than the drag being crap ( which later was improved with Carbontex drag pads ) it is a nice reel, hardly ever use it, but heck, I still got it.

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I prefer having 8.1:1 on my flipping/jig rod primarily for making those rapid fire flips into cover. Going down the bank making tiny roll casts and pitches into the bushes makes things all that much faster. Taking up the slack while I'm dragging is just an added bonus.

 

I like it for a frog rod because if they hit on a pause while there slack in my line I can get the slack in lightning fast to set the hook.

 

For both set ups its helpful too to be able to take up the slack for a good hook set if the fish runs right at you.

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Yes, I have an 8.5:1 Curado K I use for jig and texas rig fishing, also pitching from my yak. It's awesome.

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I have a few and they're main use is for slow moving and dragging baits. Also great for flipping and punching. But if you're looking for an all purpose reel, I'd stick to something in the 7:1 ratios. They're plenty fast and you can always slow it down if you need. It's really hard to slow down when you're in the 8s. LOL!

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1 hour ago, bunz559 said:

I have a few and they're main use is for slow moving and dragging baits. Also great for flipping and punching. But if you're looking for an all purpose reel, I'd stick to something in the 7:1 ratios. They're plenty fast and you can always slow it down if you need. It's really hard to slow down when you're in the 8s. LOL!

Agreed.  Something in the mid 7's if you could only have 1 reel.  It can cover just about everything and do it well.

 

If you were to be looking for dedicated jig and Texas rig setup, 8 speed no question about it.

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Every decade the "high speed" gets faster.

Todays 100 size baitcasting reels have narrower and shallower lighter weight spools,that's is the current trend. To off set the reduction in line capacity after making an average 30 yard cast the gear ratios have increased.Bait casters with 8:1 ratio overcome the 50% loss in IPT after casting and that is the reason I choose 8:1 ratio reels for bottom contact lures like jigs and worms.

Tom

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23 hours ago, WRB said:

Every decade the "high speed" gets faster.

Todays 100 size baitcasting reels have narrower and shallower lighter weight spools,that's is the current trend. To off set the reduction in line capacity after making an average 30 yard cast the gear ratios have increased.Bait casters with 8:1 ratio overcome the 50% loss in IPT after casting and that is the reason I choose 8:1 ratio reels for bottom contact lures like jigs and worms.

Tom

Is there any noticeable loss in torque with the high ratio reels, say if you stick a fish on a jig in thick grass or Lilly pads, or does a heavy rod overcome any shortcomings in power from the reel?

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21 minutes ago, Mike F said:

Is there any noticeable loss in torque with the high ratio reels, say if you stick a fish on a jig in thick grass or Lilly pads, or does a heavy rod overcome any shortcomings in power from the reel?

None than I can notice.

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Is that like the old school of thought? I’ve heard guys say that a slow reel really winches them out better. Was that back before graphite Rods or something?

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You move line with the reel not fish. Fish you control with rod pressure, the reel is used to cast out and take up line and keep it tight.

Tom

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