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Preytorien

Keeping hands warm - ideas?

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I'd like to get out and fish, but here in Central IN they're calling for snow tonight. That said, I'd like to try some early winter fishing before ice forms. I have a bit of a tradition to get out and fish a couple hours early on Thanksgiving morning alone and reflect on my blessings, but after fishing last night for only about 15 minutes due to cold fingers, my confidence is low. My hands get too wet with a casting reel, so I'll probably keep it to a spinning reel. But last night I found my fingers were still cold at the tips. Now I'll admit I wasn't using thick gloves, mostly because I wanted the dexterity of a thinner glove. Even using Nitrile gloves underneath didn't help, and the hand warmers I put on the back (top) sides of my hands didn't seem to affect anything either. 

 

Looking for unique and effective ideas you guys might have to keep hands warm in the low 30's - high 20's.

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I've never tried the hand warmer trick, but I've always heard to put them on the bottom of your wrist.

 

Maybe that will help a little?

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I wear my leather fingerless riding gloves for my Harley which I've found work well in 30's temps.   Although my hands don't seem to get wet and the leather probably wouldn't work for you then.

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Keeping the core warm allows the body to properly circulate blood. This means (1) breathable under armor layer, (2) Thermal underwear layer, (3) Fleece layer and (4) Waterproof/Windproof Shell. (5) Warm socks and (6) water repellant boots with goretex, to prevent heat loss through the feet...at this point any (7) glove that sheds a reasonable amount of water and has some insulation should be the final requirement with (8) hand warmers on top of the hands being optional . 

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34 minutes ago, bigbassin' said:

I've never tried the hand warmer trick, but I've always heard to put them on the bottom of your wrist.

 

Maybe that will help a little?

If you do that, they'll warm the blood going into your hands enough to keep you from freezing. I know it won't help tomorrow, but I bought these. They work well enough, but wouldn't be much good if tems got much below freezing. To tell you the truth, the only time I wore them, I took them off because I wanted to feel bites. I'm just not used to gloves

https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/cabelas-guidewear-glomitts-for-men?hvarAID=shopping_googleproductextensions&affcode_c=&gclid=CjwKCAiArK_fBRABEiwA0gOOc2egX1D4ZOhrTjKSMtBrXvIFd31nSNefVvrez4ijxOI-XvXXNrMF3RoC_GgQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

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The focus on core temp is key. I need my hands exposed to fish effectively. That said, even though I fish in cold weather I draw the line at about 40 deg. and light wind. Hang in there.  We're due for a warmup. I've seen winters that started out like this then eased off. I'm betting Thanksgiving is going to be warmer. 

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One thing that will keep your hands warm all day while winter fishing....... fish in Florida! In all seriousness the only ones I have ever used much are the fingerless gloves with the mitten flap over , but if it’s above 30 i just go barehanded and take lots of pocket breaks and hand switches . If it’s much below 30 My boat gets a little upset about being in the water and I usually bank fish on a point somewhere. That way you always have the option of making a fire. Here’s a picture of the gloves I’m talking about , it was about 26 that day to start and my motor was mad at me for not bank fishing 

94C9206B-5B61-4BCA-9C6A-CAD62B0FC934.jpeg

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Chemical hand warmer inside the gloves has worked well for me.  You need enough to change a few times, but it makes a big difference. 

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I’ve got a rechargeable hand warmer I bought from amazon for like $20. I work in a freezer, so I usually turn it on as I go out for my smoke break and let my hands warm up for 15 minutes. It gets real toasty real quick

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1). I have heard of climbers who brave the cold conditioning their hands in ice water every night to build a tolerance to the cold. You’d have to look into more details for how long because I do not know.

 

2) For people who have a condition called Raynaud's, it sometimes works to retrain the body’s response to cold weather. What they do is keep their hands in hot water and go outside in the cold with limited clothing.

The though on this is that the central temperature receptors in the body control the peripheral vasculature. In a normal situation, activation of central cold receptors activate a system to decrease blood supply to the hands to decrease heat loss. If the hands are kept warm and the central body is cold the vasoconstriction mechanism in the hand becomes insensitive to the signal to decrease blood supply. After desensitizing the hands, when the core temperature sensors are activated, the hands have minimal response and blood flow continues to the hands maintaining hand warmth (also resulting a net larger loss in total body heat). Not sure how effective this is for people who don’t have a severe reaction to the cold.

 

3). Alcohol or possibily niacin tabs.

 

Both of these can increase peripheral vasodilation = more blood to fingers = warmer fingers (probably face and other skin as well).

 

Make sure your core is protected from the cold though because you run the risk of cooling your blood by shunting it out to the extremities where heat loss occurs more rapidly.

 

Try at your own risk. Talk you your doctor first if you have any history of heart, stroke or other vascular disease.

 

4). You may also be able to get your doc to prescribe you a low-dose calcium channel blocker which could potentially help if you have severe circulation problems with your hands.

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26 minutes ago, Dirtyeggroll said:

1). I have heard of climbers who brave the cold conditioning their hands in ice water every night to build a tolerance to the cold. You’d have to look into more details for how long because I do not know.

 

2) For people who have a condition called Raynaud's, it sometimes works to retrain the body’s response to cold weather. What they do is keep their hands in hot water and go outside in the cold with limited clothing.

The though on this is that the central temperature receptors in the body control the peripheral vasculature. In a normal situation, activation of central cold receptors activate a system to decrease blood supply to the hands to decrease heat loss. If the hands are kept warm and the central body is cold the vasoconstriction mechanism in the hand becomes insensitive to the signal to decrease blood supply. After desensitizing the hands, when the core temperature sensors are activated, the hands have minimal response and blood flow continues to the hands maintaining hand warmth (also resulting a net larger loss in total body heat). Not sure how effective this is for people who don’t have a severe reaction to the cold.

 

3). Alcohol or possibily niacin tabs.

 

Both of these can increase peripheral vasodilation = more blood to fingers = warmer fingers (probably face and other skin as well).

 

Make sure your core is protected from the cold though because you run the risk of cooling your blood by shunting it out to the extremities where heat loss occurs more rapidly.

 

Try at your own risk. Talk you your doctor first if you have any history of heart, stroke or other vascular disease.

 

4). You may also be able to get your doc to prescribe you a low-dose calcium channel blocker which could potentially help if you have severe circulation problems with your hands.

1) no

2) no

3) no

4) no

 

Pretty sure were talking mittens, gloves and hand warmers, not drugs and drs visits. 

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29 minutes ago, Dirtyeggroll said:

1). I have heard of climbers who brave the cold conditioning their hands in ice water every night to build a tolerance to the cold. You’d have to look into more details for how long because I do not know.

 

2) For people who have a condition called Raynaud's, it sometimes works to retrain the body’s response to cold weather. What they do is keep their hands in hot water and go outside in the cold with limited clothing.

The though on this is that the central temperature receptors in the body control the peripheral vasculature. In a normal situation, activation of central cold receptors activate a system to decrease blood supply to the hands to decrease heat loss. If the hands are kept warm and the central body is cold the vasoconstriction mechanism in the hand becomes insensitive to the signal to decrease blood supply. After desensitizing the hands, when the core temperature sensors are activated, the hands have minimal response and blood flow continues to the hands maintaining hand warmth (also resulting a net larger loss in total body heat). Not sure how effective this is for people who don’t have a severe reaction to the cold.

 

3). Alcohol or possibily niacin tabs.

 

Both of these can increase peripheral vasodilation = more blood to fingers = warmer fingers (probably face and other skin as well).

 

Make sure your core is protected from the cold though because you run the risk of cooling your blood by shunting it out to the extremities where heat loss occurs more rapidly.

 

Try at your own risk. Talk you your doctor first if you have any history of heart, stroke or other vascular disease.

 

4). You may also be able to get your doc to prescribe you a low-dose calcium channel blocker which could potentially help if you have severe circulation problems with your hands.

This actually makes a lot of sense, but I doubt most folks are likely to want to expose (ha) themselves to the rigors and discomforts required to trigger these adaptations. I have been commercial fishing the ocean in the winter all my life, and my hands don't "feel" cold. I fish without gloves, and even though my hands get quite cold, sometimes to the point where it affects motion, it doesn't bother me. My feet on the other hand (ha again) always "feel" cold, though often they aren't. gloves with enough dexterity and chem warmers in pockets are what seems to work for most. I use plastic or graphite framed reels though, cause it makes a difference. If you are recreational fishing, it's for fun, so if you are going to be so cold, it's no fun, what's the point?

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16 hours ago, Preytorien said:

Looking for unique and effective ideas you guys might have to keep hands warm in the low 30's - high 20's.

 

43 minutes ago, deaknh03 said:

1) no

2) no

3) no

4) no

 

Pretty sure were talking mittens, gloves and hand warmers, not drugs and drs visits. 

OP didn’t limit the discussion to mittens, gloves and hand warmers.

 

He asked for unique and effective ways. I presented some of which have been scientifically proven to improve hand warmth and dexterity in the cold.

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As I have mentioned a couple times....the ol Nitrile gloves and a set of fingerless over top is amazing.  Also a couple hand warmers in pocket help too.  I do it all.  If your catching too many you may tear em but they're cheap.

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All good ideas guys, although I'd probably save the conditioning regimen for a last resort. I think I might look into fingerless mittens as mentioned above. I think it's the only thing I've NOT tried yet. I've used full-fingered gloves so far and that's it.

 

As @The Bassman mentioned, our Thanksgiving forecast is looking very nice, low 50's, which would definitely be alright.

 

Thanks for the tips guys!

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I may be the oddball here but through the years I have conditioned my hands to fish in the cold.  I never have been able to get used to gloves of any type.  I will put my hands in my jacket occasionally to make sure they haven't got frostbite!!:lol:  That being said, it is a painful process at the beginning of the year or fall of the year getting my hands used to the cold.  I have tried neoprene, finger-less, fleece, wool, surgical gloves and probably a lot more I am forgetting but none have worked.  I have found fighting the cold is a losing proposition so I just embrace the suck.  

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I use these with a hand warmer in the glove on top of my hand. This model just leaves the tip of the finger from the last knuckle exposed. Not insulated, and my hands still get chilly over time, but does the trick for me around 40 degrees. They also carry insulated and wool gloves for colder temps. 

 

https://www.fishmonkeygloves.com/product/pro-365-guide-glove/

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I have a Milwaulkee heated jacket that heats the torso and pockets.  It works great.  I get 4 - 5 hours from a standard battery.

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15 hours ago, Dirtyeggroll said:

3). Alcohol or possibily niacin tabs.

 

Both of these can increase peripheral vasodilation = more blood to fingers = warmer fingers (probably face and other skin as well).

There are also several dietary supplements used for various things that promote vasodilation.  The popular weightlifting supplement nitric oxide is readily available.  The problem is that vasodilation only provides the FEELING of warmth by increasing blood flow.  It's true effect, though, is to drastically increase the LOSS of body heat as the expansion of capillaries bring them closer to the surface of the skin allowing your body head to escape more quickly (while still having a feeling of "warmness" and a "flushed" appearance to your complexion).  You can see how that could be dangerous while outdoors in the cold.  

3 hours ago, DogBone_384 said:

I have a Milwaulkee heated jacket that heats the torso and pockets.  It works great.  I get 4 - 5 hours from a standard battery.

That sounds awesome!  I'm Googling now...

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7 hours ago, BigAngus752 said:

There are also several dietary supplements used for various things that promote vasodilation.  The popular weightlifting supplement nitric oxide is readily available.  The problem is that vasodilation only provides the FEELING of warmth by increasing blood flow.  It's true effect, though, is to drastically increase the LOSS of body heat as the expansion of capillaries bring them closer to the surface of the skin allowing your body head to escape more quickly (while still having a feeling of "warmness" and a "flushed" appearance to your complexion).  You can see how that could be dangerous while outdoors in the cold.  

That sounds awesome!  I'm Googling now...

The point of your statement is in the right direction but some important details are a little inaccurate.

 

Warm blood to the extremities actually makes the extremities warmer. But, as you stated (and as I did), it also increases the rate of total body heat loss. The extremities feel warmer because they are warmer. That warmth, however, is being diverted away from the core, where the vital organs reside, and where heat is more easily preserved due to a variety of lessons. In other words, the physiologic response to cold is to shunt blood away from the extremities and toward the core to protect from hypothermia from visceral organs. When this system is overridden, the the core and peripheral body temperature drop at the same time and the thought is that when you extremities really start to feel cold so is your core body temperature, which is potentially dangerous.

 

Many skiers and snowboarders end up suffering from hypothermia each year due to the effect alcohol to blunt the thermodegulatory centers in the brain so there is loss of peripheral vasoconstriction and loss of shivering (which generates heat). What tends to happen is they stay out too long and are too far away from a way to get back. By the time they start feeling cold is really too late and the other symptoms of hypothermia (essentially lethargy/tired/weakness) take over very fast.

 

To fall in to cold water without in tact mechanism to shunt blood away from the extremities and to the core could be catastrophic.

 

Also, the common bodybuilding supplement is actually L-arginine which is a cofactor necessary for the production of nitric oxide (vs. actually ingesting nitric oxide).

 

The primary reason people don’t tolerate these types of vasodilators is headache and flushing.

 

Sorry to take up space in the thread with a physiology lesson. 

 

Try at your own risk.

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In the winter I fish with my hunting gloves, I don't mind my finger tips getting frozen as the rest of my hands stay nice and warm.

The mitten pop-tops have magnets that hold them open so they don't get in the way while casting/reeling.

c6045d89-6b78-43a6-a8d9-54f4eab0c292_1.69e23636b29be0473a8f0cb19d4086d3.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF

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Orvis sells a fantastic pair of 100% wool fingerless gloves. And they’re cheap! I carry two pairs. You can easily shake them dry if they get wet. I’ve worn them for years doing a ton of flyfishing in New England throughout the bitter cold winters. 

 

Additionally, as previously stated, keep your core warm. Layers! You don’t want clothes that fit too snug. Wool is my best friend. It’s wicks better than any other material. I wear two light layers of cotton underneath, with a lightweight wool sweater over, and a good cold weather jacket. I wear silk socks, with a pair of wool socks over them. 

 

It also just just as important to minimize sweating before you get out on the water. Don’t put you heavy layers on until you are getting ready to hit the water. 

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I'm a big fan of the Simm's Ultrawool 3-finger fishing gloves. They're made of wool and have a wrist pocket for heat warmers. The three fingers are exposed for dexterity. 

 

https://www.simmsfishing.com/shop/gear/gloves/ultra-wool-core-3-finger-liner

 

Or if you want to go all-out, get the Prodry gloves, which come with the above gloves. You wear the wool gloves inside a GorTex glove, which are wind and waterproof while providing great gripping power.

 

These are great for running down the lake in cold, wet weather.  Then you can pull the exterior gloves off and fish with the wool gloves.

 

https://www.simmsfishing.com/shop/gear/gloves/prodry-glove-plus-liner

 

 

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Move to South Florida, I am still in shorts and a T-Shirt here.

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Carry a spare set of gloves, in case you get the main pair wet.  I'm sure there's something to the conditioning bit, but that won't help you this weekend.  It's going to be in the teens here tomorrow.  I'll probably have to wear my fingerless gloves.

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