Jump to content
Mr. Aquarium

crawdads and the cold?

Recommended Posts

Do crawdads hibernate? What water temps do they stop becoming active? or Do the migrate deep? 

Water temps up here in MA are 43-46 degrees

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They stay active year round. But will slow down in winter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crawdads don't go into a true hibernation but they do burrow into clay bottoms and become doormat slowing way way down during water colder then 50- 45 degrees.

The crawdads also migrate from aquatic plant areas and rock areas to clay areas as the water cools, see 1 ton jig thread.

Tom

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on the body of water  😉

 

Our shallow water marshes, yeah they buried up, deep water river crawfish are still moving about.

 

But our deep water aint that cold!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just had a thought that maybe already has been covered.  Crawdads in some body's of water turn orange or shades of orange in the fall.....Wonder if this co insides with the leaves changing and them blending into the bottom for camo purposes!?  (gosh....water's not even frozen here!)

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, WRB said:

Crawdads don't go into a true hibernation but they do burrow into clay bottoms and become doormat slowing way way down during water colder then 50- 45 degrees.

The crawdads also migrate from aquatic plant areas and rock areas to clay areas as the water cools, see 1 ton jig thread.

Tom

yes! saw that and thats why I posted this! 

2 hours ago, Oregon Native said:

Just had a thought that maybe already has been covered.  Crawdads in some body's of water turn orange or shades of orange in the fall.....Wonder if this co insides with the leaves changing and them blending into the bottom for camo purposes!?  (gosh....water's not even frozen here!)

HMMMM thats brilliant and would make sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Once I was watching the water flow through a culvert  pipe . It was the only area not frozen . I got down close to look at things and there were several crawdads huddled together motionless .  What struck me was their color ,  purple .

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow thats crazy!!! looks like I'll keep the jigs out for winter bass. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Color expression in crawfish is regulated largely by special pigment containing cells (chromatophores) located beneath the exoskeleton, and color is normally a function of two factors, developmental stage and the environment. Most crawfish species are generally greenish or brownish as immature animals and begin to take on the characteristic colors as they approach maturity. Color manifestations is intensified in sexually mature individuals. The aquatic environment and diet also influence color.

 

Individual specimens of crawfish vary in color from the normal population. Color variants are almost endless with respect to degree and/or pattern of expression.

 

Molting is the periodic shedding of the old exoskeleton (shell) and takes place with each increase in size which can be 4-6 times a year; once the crawfish reaches maturity the molting process stops Each individual crawfish will vary in color before, during, & after molting!

 

LSU AGCenter

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most States have several native crayfish (crawdads) species each with different coloration and each of those species have seasonal coloration variations and molting color changes. 

California only has very few native crayfish specie, signal crawdad I believe is the only still living. Like bass the crawdads where transplanted in California,  most common is the Louisiana swamp crawdad in Southern Cal. Louisiana has over 35 crawdad species.

I don't see many crawdads along the shore during our cold water period. I do see crawdads comming out of burrows in clay banks as the water warms to about 50-55 degrees in pre spawn period. Crawdads are out and about more at night and you can feel hard lumps in bass bellies during winter months, so they are out and about then. Jigs difinately work year around.

When you look closely at a live crawdads shell the coloration is made up of multiple colors like a dot matrix that may have a overall look of brown or green but has red, black, blue, green dots for example that blend together.

Unlimited number of crawdad coloration combinations depending on the species.

Tom

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crawfish wait until the water temperature reaches into the 50's when they become active and can be caught and then boiled until they turn a beautiful red.

 

You can add Cajun seasoning, potatoes and corn to the boiling water to add to their succulence.

 

They are best served on a table covered with newspaper in your back yard or at an LSU crawfish boil that features Cajun and Zydeco music.

 

This makes the crawfish very happy along with a lot of us who cherish them.

 

These are the days when it is OK to act like a bass and eat till you can't move and your thumbnail hurts for a week after from the peeling of those lovely creatures.

 

Enjoy!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, WRB said:

Most States have several native crayfish (crawdads) species each with different coloration and each of those species have seasonal coloration variations and molting color changes. 

California only has very few native crayfish specie, signal crawdad I believe is the only still living. Like bass the crawdads where transplanted in California,  most common is the Louisiana swamp crawdad in Southern Cal. Louisiana has over 35 crawdad species.

I don't see many crawdads along the shore during our cold water period. I do see crawdads comming out of burrows in clay banks as the water warms to about 50-55 degrees in pre spawn period. Crawdads are out and about more at night and you can feel hard lumps in bass bellies during winter months, so they are out and about then. Jigs difinately work year around.

When you look closely at a live crawdads shell the coloration is made up of multiple colors like a dot matrix that may have a overall look of brown or green but has red, black, blue, green dots for example that blend together.

Unlimited number of crawdad coloration combinations depending on the species.

Tom

 

Here in MA we have 2 craws at least, one was found in a muddy river, the ones I see a lot are in clear clean lakes and ponds

8 hours ago, Sam said:

Crawfish wait until the water temperature reaches into the 50's when they become active and can be caught and then boiled until they turn a beautiful red.

 

You can add Cajun seasoning, potatoes and corn to the boiling water to add to their succulence.

 

They are best served on a table covered with newspaper in your back yard or at an LSU crawfish boil that features Cajun and Zydeco music.

 

This makes the crawfish very happy along with a lot of us who cherish them.

 

These are the days when it is OK to act like a bass and eat till you can't move and your thumbnail hurts for a week after from the peeling of those lovely creatures.

 

Enjoy!

I've never had crawfish, but LOVE LOVE LOVE North Atlantic lobster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quick look Maine has 8 native and several invasive species of crawdads.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a color chart of some of the varieties in Mississippi.

 

 

 

image.thumb.png.5fdebba3fc7d0854f117741c2404aa15.png

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Mr. Aquarium said:

Here in MA we have 2 craws at least, one was found in a muddy river, the ones I see a lot are in clear clean lakes and ponds

I've never had crawfish, but LOVE LOVE LOVE North Atlantic lobster

Same thing. You would love crawfish. Try to find an LSU or other Louisiana college alumni chapter crawfish boil in your area this summer and go and have a blast.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cold water, fish the jig slow or bounce the stereotypical cold water crankbaits off rock.

 

All this crawfish talk is making my head hurt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, everythingthatswims said:

Cold water, fish the jig slow or bounce the stereotypical cold water crankbaits off rock.

 

All this crawfish talk is making my head hurt.

Makes me hungry! :)

 

Merry Christmas!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎12‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 5:33 PM, WRB said:

Most States have several native crayfish (crawdads) species each with different coloration and each of those species have seasonal coloration variations and molting color changes. 

California only has very few native crayfish specie, signal crawdad I believe is the only still living. Like bass the crawdads where transplanted in California,  most common is the Louisiana swamp crawdad in Southern Cal. Louisiana has over 35 crawdad species.

I don't see many crawdads along the shore during our cold water period. I do see crawdads comming out of burrows in clay banks as the water warms to about 50-55 degrees in pre spawn period. Crawdads are out and about more at night and you can feel hard lumps in bass bellies during winter months, so they are out and about then. Jigs difinately work year around.

When you look closely at a live crawdads shell the coloration is made up of multiple colors like a dot matrix that may have a overall look of brown or green but has red, black, blue, green dots for example that blend together.

Unlimited number of crawdad coloration combinations depending on the species.

Tom

 

Tom, many years ago I got a poster from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries titled "Crayfish of Virginia."

 

Of course, us crawfish connoisseurs spell the name "crawfish" without the "y" but that is not a big deal. We all know what we are talking about.

 

The poster shows 33 of the 34 different species in the Commonwealth and USA along with the following information. I think you and everyone else will enjoy what was penned about our lovely crustaceans.

 

"Crayfish - also known as crawfish, crawdads, and mudbugs - are a diverse and important group of freshwater invertebrates. Worldwide, approximately 530 species have been identified, with over 400 species found in North America.  These 10-legged relatives of the lobster live in a variety of habitats including springs, streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, swamps, and caves.

 

Some specifies live exclusively in burrows - underground networks of tunnels market by a hole or mud chimney.

 

Normally living 2-4 years, crayfish typically range between 1 and 6 inches in length, though the largest species, the Tasmanian Crayfish, can reach 2 feet in length and exceed 10 pounds in weight (my dream crawfish). While most people think of them as bait or menu items, crayfish serve critical roles in the aquatic environment including consuming and ingestion of vegetation and decaying matter, movement of sediment, and as a food source for many wildlife species.  In addition, crayfish aquaculture is big business, contributing over $120 million annually to Louisiana's economy.

 

At least 29 crayfish species can be found in Virginia, including 25 native species and 4 exotics, ranking the Commonwealth in the top 25% nationally for diversity.  This number will likely climb as more attention is paid to these crustaceans and previously undescribed species are discovered.

 

While no crayfish currently are listed as Threatened or Endangered in the Commonwealth, 14 species are listed in the state's Wildlife Action Plan as needing significant conservation action.

 

Pollution and habitat loss are the major factors in crayfish declines, with introduction of exotic species emerging as primary concern.  To help prevent introduction of exotic species, the sale of live crayfish as bait in pet shops is prohibited in Virginia.  Please help preserve our native crayfish by conserving the Commonwealth's aquatic resources and by preventing the introduction of exotic species."

 

As you can read above, there are over 400 different types of crawfish in North America. It is really amazing to realize that we have so many different types of crawfish in the world.

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Sam said:

Same thing. You would love crawfish. Try to find an LSU or other Louisiana college alumni chapter crawfish boil in your area this summer and go and have a blast.

oh boy!! that sounds awesome! bunch of drunk women and craw fish! WOOOOO

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Mr. Aquarium said:

oh boy!! that sounds awesome! bunch of drunk women and craw fish! WOOOOO

LOL!

 

No one gets drunk at a crawfish boil. Too busy eating and socializing. And a cold Barq's (It's Good) is much better than beer, unless it is Abita Purple Haze.

 

Abita Purple Haze is one really great beer.

 

You have got to attend a real Louisiana crawfish boil. Put it on your bucket list. Visit Louisiana and do some fishing this winter. Big redfish; big sheepsheads; big drum; really big catfish; big Sac-a-Lait; and tremendous largemouth bass.

 

And visit the French Quarter for some real fun. You will have a blast fishing and eating you way through the state.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Sam said:

Abita Purple Haze is one really great beer.

Sure is.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Sam said:

LOL!

 

No one gets drunk at a crawfish boil. Too busy eating and socializing. And a cold Barq's (It's Good) is much better than beer, unless it is Abita Purple Haze.

 

Abita Purple Haze is one really great beer.

 

You have got to attend a real Louisiana crawfish boil. Put it on your bucket list. Visit Louisiana and do some fishing this winter. Big redfish; big sheepsheads; big drum; really big catfish; big Sac-a-Lait; and tremendous largemouth bass.

 

And visit the French Quarter for some real fun. You will have a blast fishing and eating you way through the state.

man I wish I could, when I get that better  job, a career I will be traveling a lot. That sounds awesome! I want to meet Shelby the swampman 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, MIbassyaker said:

Here's a crayfish poster for Michigan:

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/dnr/crayfish.posterDNR_522337_7.pdf

 

Lots of O. propinquus and O. virilis in my area.

My Virginia chart has the same pictures. Very interesting that we have the same species in Virginia as you do in Michigan.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was deer hunting along a frozen marsh in eastern Kansas yesterday. it had a round 3/4 inch of ice.

just happened to look down and  saw crawdads swimming around under the ice. They were bright orange.

I have never seen that before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×