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Adleyfishes

Company For Recycling Your Baits

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For awhile now I've been considering creating a movement for cleaning up local waters and an idea just hit me in the past couple days or so. I've heard of recycling your soft plastics for awhile now and I go through hundreds and hundreds each year. I'm only 15 so this is kind of a broad idea that seems a little scary to attempt. I questioned where do everyone's plastics go. They go to the trash or in the body of water or just get lost, and thinking about anglers all across the states I realized this has to be effecting the fish whether the effect is big or small. Thus I'm setting out to buy aluminum molds and and get all the equipment I need to reuse and recycle my baits, but if its just me I'm not helping everybody out. So my question is if I was to say start a company that recycled baits in bulk amounts for a small labor fee and shipping would it take off? I don't want to include any information to seem like I'm promoting myself but I already have a large amount of following on social media platforms and I think people would love to help out the environment and save some money I wrote out a super simple one year plan and already have everything (including the injector and proper safety equipment) but the molds. Do I go for it and try to help everyone out a bit or is the idea useless and won't take off? Any opinions, thoughts, or ideas?

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I already throw dead artificial baits in the burn pile. I never leave a soft let alone a hard if I can help it. 

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You want to charge me to send you old plastics? Not gonna happen. May I suggest you pay for shipping via an agreed price with UPS or USPS for the size and weight of plastics that will fit in a 1 gallon ziplock bag. I email you when I have a full bag of plastics. You email me a shipping label, a current catalog, and a discount code to buy your recycled baits.

 

Second, contact Bass Pro, Cabelas, Dicks, your local bait and tackle. Ask if you could place a bait recycle bin in the lobby. (Maybe a shippable tote). The bin would advertise your business and how us, as fisherman can help save the environment. Maybe a tear off coupon with your website info and a discount code.

 

 

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As far as a business model hardly anyone would pay you to send you what most would consider "trash". More than likely you'd have to send people pre-paid mailing stickers so they could send you their stuff, then maybe sweeten then deal with a free pack of your recycled baits for every X lbs of used baits they send you. Then weigh the economics of doing this with how much you could sell the baits for. 

 

The main issue you face with bulk recycling like this is your product quality will fluctuate just by the nature of your material supply. And you'll only be able to make one color...a dark mud/black color, unless you go through extensive sorting before molding to separate by color. Even then the salt content, flake content, rigidity of the old plastics will all very with every batch and affect the feel and action of any baits produced by them. It would be very hard to control.

You'd also have to consider what it would take to ensure things like hooks, split rings, snaps, nail weights, etc. don't end up getting into and damaging a mold. 

 

Like @slonezp said if you could get tackle shops and places like BPS to setup collection bins that would be ideal and maybe make it financially viable. 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, MassYak85 said:

The main issue you face with bulk recycling like this is your product quality will fluctuate just by the nature of your material supply.

And given this, your prices for the re-sell will have to be lower than the market average. People aren't going to pay premium prices for questionable quality.

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1 hour ago, slonezp said:

You want to charge me to send you old plastics? Not gonna happen. May I suggest you pay for shipping via an agreed price with UPS or USPS for the size and weight of plastics that will fit in a 1 gallon ziplock bag. I email you when I have a full bag of plastics. You email me a shipping label, a current catalog, and a discount code to buy your recycled baits.

 

Second, contact Bass Pro, Cabelas, Dicks, your local bait and tackle. Ask if you could place a bait recycle bin in the lobby. (Maybe a shippable tote). The bin would advertise your business and how us, as fisherman can help save the environment. Maybe a tear off coupon with your website info and a discount code.

 

 

What I was trying to say is I'd just reproduce the bait in the requested style/mold not make them pay to send me ripped baits. Then once I got their old baits I could re-pour them depending on what they wanted and send them back to the previous owner. Once its poured your not paying for the material aspect as the consumer.

23 minutes ago, JustALineWetter said:

And given this, your prices for the re-sell will have to be lower than the market average. People aren't going to pay premium prices for questionable quality.

I should have been clearer I'm not re-selling I'm repouring your baits in a new mold and sending them directly back to you and my goal is for people to not have to pay premium prices whatsoever and cut material costs while helping out fisheries.

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Just now, Adleyfishes said:

What I was trying to say is I'd just reproduce the bait in the requested style/mold not make them pay to send me ripped baits. Then once I got their old baits I could re-pour them depending on what they wanted and send them back to the previous owner. Once its poured your not paying for the material aspect as the consumer.

You'd need to base your pricing on

1) Time it takes you to do the work (I suggest MINIMUM of $10/hr if part-time, $13-15/hr if this is going to be a full-time gig)

2) Shipping costs to you and back

3) Wear-n-tear on your equipment - everything breaks down eventually

3) Miscellaneous costs - gotta cover the electricity usage your equipment needs, non-reusable items (rags, etc)

 

You'll find out that what your pricing NEEDS to be to earn a profit is more than people are willing to spend.

 

Trust me, I ran a cabinet making business...tried at the start to severely undercut my competitors, but ended up being about par on the pricing.

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4 minutes ago, Adleyfishes said:

What I was trying to say is I'd just reproduce the bait in the requested style/mold not make them pay to send me ripped baits. Then once I got their old baits I could re-pour them depending on what they wanted and send them back to the previous owner. Once its poured your not paying for the material aspect as the consumer.

Sorry to say there is no possible way you could be profitable doing that.

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6 minutes ago, Adleyfishes said:

I should have been clearer I'm not re-selling I'm repouring your baits in a new mold and sending them directly back to you and my goal is for people to not have to pay premium prices whatsoever and cut material costs while helping out fisheries.

So you're doing this for free? How are you going to recoup the costs associated with doing this?

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4 minutes ago, JustALineWetter said:

So you're doing this for free? How are you going to recoup the costs associated with doing this?

Once I have enough molds and got a hang of the process I wanted to have the "recycling" be a service that the company just happened to include and as a kid I just have to makeup for my initial investment. Once I've covered my initial investment I could expand to make making packaged baits with specific formulas and consistencies then once thats done I'm making a profit margin just the same as any normal soft plastic company does thats small.

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You could be profitable getting used bulk plastics for free, separating colors, and melting them down to pour into your own molds, providing you have a customer base sold on the recycled concept. You are limiting your market. That is not necessarily a bad thing. I'f you can sell at a pricepoint between $2-$3 a bag, you will undercut the pricepoint of new plastics. Unfortunately, not everyone is sold on the concept of recycling. Secondly, and more importantly, bait manufacturers spend millions of dollars on marketing. If I think Rage Craw is the in bait this year, why would I buy Recycled Craw?

 

and before I forget, Kudos to you for being business minded at such a young age.

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3 minutes ago, slonezp said:

You could be profitable getting used bulk plastics for free, separating colors, and melting them down to pour into your own molds, providing you have a customer base sold on the recycled concept. You are limiting your market. That is not necessarily a bad thing. I'f you can sell at a pricepoint between $2-$3 a bag, you will undercut the pricepoint of new plastics. Unfortunately, not everyone is sold on the concept of recycling. Secondly, and more importantly, bait manufacturers spend millions of dollars on marketing. If I think Rage Craw is the in bait this year, why would I buy Recycled Craw?

 

and before I forget, Kudos to you for being business minded at such a young age.

This last summer I grew a social media profile from a couple hundred followers to 3000 without spending a dime and I got some free product along the way and I think the Idea could attract some attention especially for people like me on a budget or just a new outlook on a concept seems to attract attention on social platforms. You see fishing line recycling bins why not ones for baits furthermore why not save your money and recycle your senkos and get back the same amount you started with for a much lower price than if you were to go out and have to buy 10 more packs of Senkos. I mean once the baits are melted down they should have close to the same properties.

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1 minute ago, Adleyfishes said:

I mean once the baits are melted down they should have close to the same properties.

Talking specifically about Senkos - there's an exact level of salt in those that slowly leeches away every time you cast it into the water. Unless they're sending you Senkos that have only been cast a few times before being damaged, the re-molds are going to be lower quality. A mixed bag of 'fresh' and 'well used' wouldn't be anywhere near the same properties. The density will be less for one and that will affect the action.

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1 minute ago, JustALineWetter said:

Talking specifically about Senkos - there's an exact level of salt in those that slowly leeches away every time you cast it into the water. Unless they're sending you Senkos that have only been cast a few times before being damaged, the re-molds are going to be lower quality. A mixed bag of 'fresh' and 'well used' wouldn't be anywhere near the same properties. The density will be less for one and that will affect the action.

I never took that into consideration. Thank you for the thought... now on to solving the next problem on the never ending list of problems...

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3 minutes ago, Adleyfishes said:

I never took that into consideration. Thank you for the thought... now on to solving the next problem on the never ending list of problems...

I might add that Berkley Powerbaits suffer a similar problem. The scent molded into them leeches into the water, that what gives them the extra attraction. Also the chemical scent is finicky when it comes to temperature of the molding. If it's even just a few degrees too high, the scent will 'vaporize' away, leaving you nothing but plain plastic without ANY scent.

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2 minutes ago, JustALineWetter said:

I might add that Berkley Powerbaits suffer a similar problem. The scent molded into them leeches into the water, that what gives them the extra attraction. Also the chemical scent is finicky when it comes to temperature of the molding. If it's even just a few degrees too high, the scent will 'vaporize' away, leaving you nothing but plain plastic without ANY scent.

I may be wrong but I could add my own scent to the plastic before it is poured.  I've worked with a scent company before I figure they could help me out and I could add that into the mix after sorting the baits by color. Also I want to give you a big thanks for the help and bringing these issues to light but I'm more determined now than ever also once this is rolling expect a pm maybe I can send you some free baits if this works out and test them out to to see if you skepticism was correct or not.

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One thing that has not been mentioned is taxes.  Don't forget state sales taxes and federal excise tax.  They will come into play not only in product sales but also in record keeping.  Here in MO when I looked into starting a bait company the government said I'd have to keep record of all customers and charge them sales tax which would have to be forwarded to the state.

 

If you don't want this to become an overbearing burden for you, you will have to figure some kind of profit.  Bait making is quite time consuming and takes a dedicated space or workshop.  Good luck on your project.

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Seems I read about a company started by some young anglers that paid people for their used plastics (a price per pound) re-poured them and then re-sold them on a website.  As has been mentioned, you would have a problem with salt/scent as well as the fact that some plastics don't play well with others.  Putting them together doesn't work.  Has to do with the chemical makeup of the baits.  Finally, you'll never get consistent colors or fleck that so many of us are fixated on, in other words, your pours will never be the same.  Seems the company I read about ended up with mostly brown baits because that is what happened when they re-poured them.  Some major hurdles but good luck if you decide to give it a shot.  

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Your 15 really? Already have a business idea like this? Way to go thinking ahead and being a environmental friendly, bass fishing, productive part to a decaying society. 

 

I'll throw my 2 cents in the ring. Mow some yards or something to earn money and buy the molds and supplies you'll need. Start experimenting on your own soft plastics, researching and studying continue to gain Knowledge. 

 

Second, start local. Check with local authorities first, but collection boxes at local boat ramps is a superb idea, after a day of fishing what fisherman doesn't have used plastics in the bottom of his/her boat? Make sure you advertise on your boxes, "recylcled worms"(etc.) Cheap! Social media, advertise pictures of your products and so on.. 

 

Once things pick up Branch out more, more collection boxes in different counties throughout your state, then continue to advertise, go to local fishing expos, tournaments, sharing your idea and products. 

 

You can make this happen if you strive for it. Great idea, I for one as an angler, am glad to see the next generation of anglers being proactive.

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I have nothing to add that might be of assistance.

But my hat is off to you, young man.  I wish you the best of luck in this or other endeavors.    I like the way you think 

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I've done some remelting plastics myself because I try to recycle everything I can. It's a lot of work and some types of plastic just plain don't work for repours. 

 

I think a good alternative would be for the big bait companies to look into producing baits that slowly biodegrade. I know Gulp and a few others do, but a majority don't. 

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The virgin plastic used to make baits is not a huge expense compared to the molds and the labor.

 

Reheating used plastic these days is not so easy. Many different kinds of plastic that dont play nice together when melted. Most hold moisture and bubble. They burn easy and tend to smell. 

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