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Kenneth Chang

Is 2 pound fluorocarbon too light for trout?

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I’m gonna go fishing at a stocked pond in a few days and I bought 2 pound Berkeley vanish fluorocarbon. Is this too light. I usually fish for trout with powerbait and in-line spinners.

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Depends on how big the trout are.  It's way too light for the trout I fish for.  If they're just little stockies, then it should be fine.  This fish I used 6# Invisx.

 

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IMO, yes. It gets iffy when fishing lighter than 4lb fluoro for trout. Fluorocarbon's physical characteristics make it a less than ideal choice for 2lb, you just won't have any knot strength. 2lb mono would be a blast and is much more forgiving.

 

FYI, 4lb seaguar fluoro is the same diameter as most 2lb lines. Casts great and is very sensitive.

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If you're going after brookies and stream rainbows, I'd go 4# on FC, but as said, 2# mono would be okay.

 

I never use less than 4# mono on my UL rig, which I do use to go after stream trout on occasion.

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28 minutes ago, J Francho said:

Depends on how big the trout are.  It's way too light for the trout I fish for.  If they're just little stockies, then it should be fine.  This fish I used 6# Invisx.

 

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Not everybody can catch 10 pound 'bows in their driveway @J Francho 

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I don’t go any less than 4lb on spinning tackle-Especially flouro, perhaps my knot game isn’t very strong but I have no trust in light FC.   snag a twig that’s stuck in the gravel and say goodbye to your lure.  I use braid to leader,  4lb mono on the UL and 6lb on the ML for trout/salmon in the rivers and lakes, averaging 10”-18” with occasional 3lb+ fish.  

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2 lb test FC leader is on the light side, I prefer 3 lb, small enough diameter to get bites using dough baits with size 16 gold treble hooks. Main line should be 4 lb to 6 lb test mono and tie directly to  a small snap swivel for inline spinner.

Use the 2 lb for leader material, about 36" long and use the snap swivel as a egg sinker stop for a bottom rig.

Tom

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Depends. For standard powerbaiting and in-line spinners in a stocked pond, I'd say no. Too fragile -for reasons described above. And you'll be needing very small, light wire, and sharp hooks.

 

I've caught trout up to 9lbs on 2kg nylon monos. There was a bit of a learning curve there, but worth it for what I learned about fish in water. Would I do it again? No. It's a stunt, and it's not good for the fish.

 

I also feel that fish fight best on properly scaled tackle. I like enough power to move the fish, but not totally hinder their abilities. I'd decided years ago that for the majority of the lake-run trout I caught, 6lb was about right. (These were 2 to 10lb fish). Any lighter and the fish had too much sway, took too long to subdue them, and with this, much of the fun of fighting a capable fish on scaled tackle.

 

The other stuff that weighs in though is what's needed to deal with the water conditions in front of you. 2lb lines are highly specialized, along with the rest of gear they are attached to -at both ends: hooks, knots, rods, reels (esp if you are using drag). So such line's utility is pretty darn restricted.

 

Even in fly-fishing 2lb tippets are specialized and so used for specific circumstances, usually when fish are myopic about really tiny insects.

 

 

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I almost always use 4 lb. mono when trout fishing. That being said, I've used 2 lb. mono a few times, throwing 1/16oz Rooster Tails on the Candy Fork River (TN). I've had good results with the 2 lb. but feel more comfortable with 4.

 

The people at Trout Magnet actually suggest using a 2 lb. leader.

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I wouldn't use it except in the clearest water for the most finicky fish. 4lb is so much stronger and with the lines today you can get such a thin fluorocarbon that there really isn't a need to drop down to 2lb. The stocked lakes I fish have some really large fish that I wouldn't want to target with 2lb test anyways. 

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If you actually want to fish with 2#, take a close look at IGFA line class records.  There's a few out there ripe for picking off.  My friend holds a couple for walleye and trout.  You'll have to register and use approved lines, though.

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@J Francho you must not be suggesting 2lb line class records for trout!  Most of those records are double digits even with 20lbs+ fish.

 

Now if your a female angler there’s even vacant Largemouth Bass line class records. (Not that I think Kenneth is a female)

 

Your buddy must hold some respectable ones though for trout/walleye, they’re pretty filled up.  Alot of them seem pointless unless you have a real giant.  I have the book,  there’s a lot of records where, certain species, 4lb class would be something like 30lbs, and the 20lb class would be like 3lb...

 

All tackle record for Chain Pickerel is 24”.  How many BR members have thrown back the World Record?

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9 hours ago, Arcs&sparks said:

Your buddy must hold some respectable ones though for trout/walleye, they’re pretty filled up.

I think it's 4# or 6# line.  Burney Haney is his name.  I know he has a trout record as well.  Trout is pretty stout, I hadn't really looked at it in a while.  The smallmouth record might be do-able.  I know he's gone out for that as well.  Lastly, not a line class record, but I definitely think the NY record rock bass can be beat.

 

That's a topic for another thread...carry on. ;)

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It depends.  If you have a longer (8ft+) noodle type rod, you'll be fine with 2lb since the rod will be doing most of the work.  With a shorter rod, say in the 5ft to 6ft range, you may want to go up to 6lb line.

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On 1/8/2019 at 9:05 PM, volzfan59 said:

The people at Trout Magnet actually suggest using a 2 lb. leader.

I realize I'm a little late to comment on this one but I just picked up some Trout Magnet 2lb line to try in place of the normal 4lb Stren I've been using. The Trout Magnet 2lb line is .16mm vs Stren's 4lb's .20mm, so it's a little bit thinner line but still a bit thicker than Trilene XL's 2mm which is .13mm and a little too weak.

 

I think they might suggest using 4lb line if it was Trilene XL.

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I don't know. While I was still working at BPS, the guy that owned Trout Magnet (Jeff something I think) said 2lb. test would give their lures the most action. I believe that he also mentioned using a 2lb. leader with maybe 6lb. main line.

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