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Team9nine

Flash Quiz - Soft Plastics

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Match up the bait to the year it was introduced  - GO!! B)

 

The Baits

  • Slug-Go
  • Mr. Twister curlytail
  • Senko
  • Trick Worm (Zoom)
  • Mann's Jellyworm
  • Brush Hog (Zoom)
  • Salt impregnation (Larew)

 

The Years

  • 1984
  • 1967
  • 1980
  • 1997
  • 1973
  • 1987
  • 1981
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1984-brush hog, 1967 jellyworm, 1980 salt impegnation, 1997 senko, 1973 curlytail, 1987 trickworm, 1981 sluggo

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Only 2 of them were introduced after I was born 😂 Senko was obviously '97 but I'd be making educated guesses on the rest.

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Mann's Jelly Worm introduced in 1967 and it hit the big time in 1973. This will be my 52nd year using them. My favorite are the 9" and 12" Blackberry.

544.JPG

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The answers, as excerpted from an old Louie Stout article on the history of plastic worms:

 

1967: Bass fisherman Tom Mann, concerned about the toughness and smell of plastic worms, created the Jelly Worm by adding fruit flavors to the plastic. Purple worms smelled like grape, black like blackberry and red like strawberry.

 

1973: With growing demand for a worm that "swims," Glynn Carver of Mister Twister created curly tail grubs that led to the ribbontail worm design shortly thereafter.

 

1980: Gene Larew experimented with a variety of additives that would make bass respond better to soft baits. After failures with sugar, chocolate and even Coca-Cola, he patented a salt impregnation process in 1980. It is used by most major soft bait companies today.

 

1981: Zoom introduced the Trick Worm, the first straight-tail, high floating, supersoft plastic worm for fishing shallow water.

 

1984: The Zoom Brush Hog triggered the creature bait craze. Oddly enough, the company created the lure several years prior to that but elected not to market it. However, a Mississippi angler got his hands on prototypes and loved them so much he ordered 300 to 400 bags, and Zoom decided to offer it nationally.

 

1987: Lunker City Specialists developed the first soft plastic jerkbait in a Connecticut garage. The Slug-Go led to the creation of soft jerkbaits that are now offered by nearly every soft bait maker.

 

1997: While trying to sketch a unique worm design with a ballpoint pen, Gary Yamamoto chose to use the ink pen he had in his hand as a prototype. It had a blunt end and a tapered end, which proved to be the forerunner for the Senko, or stickworm, that has enraptured bass and anglers nationwide.

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10 hours ago, Team9nine said:

The answers, as excerpted from an old Louie Stout article on the history of plastic worms:

 

1967: Bass fisherman Tom Mann, concerned about the toughness and smell of plastic worms, created the Jelly Worm by adding fruit flavors to the plastic. Purple worms smelled like grape, black like blackberry and red like strawberry.

 

1973: With growing demand for a worm that "swims," Glynn Carver of Mister Twister created curly tail grubs that led to the ribbontail worm design shortly thereafter.

 

1980: Gene Larew experimented with a variety of additives that would make bass respond better to soft baits. After failures with sugar, chocolate and even Coca-Cola, he patented a salt impregnation process in 1980. It is used by most major soft bait companies today.

 

1981: Zoom introduced the Trick Worm, the first straight-tail, high floating, supersoft plastic worm for fishing shallow water.

 

1984: The Zoom Brush Hog triggered the creature bait craze. Oddly enough, the company created the lure several years prior to that but elected not to market it. However, a Mississippi angler got his hands on prototypes and loved them so much he ordered 300 to 400 bags, and Zoom decided to offer it nationally.

 

1987: Lunker City Specialists developed the first soft plastic jerkbait in a Connecticut garage. The Slug-Go led to the creation of soft jerkbaits that are now offered by nearly every soft bait maker.

 

1997: While trying to sketch a unique worm design with a ballpoint pen, Gary Yamamoto chose to use the ink pen he had in his hand as a prototype. It had a blunt end and a tapered end, which proved to be the forerunner for the Senko, or stickworm, that has enraptured bass and anglers nationwide.

Saw an article a few years ago in a magazine. It said Zoom created the Green Pumpkin color. It was created by accident and whoever they made the baits for refused them. They found someone else to buy them. And as they say, the rest is history.

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From what I understand, the brush hog history is irrelevant compared to the history of the baby brush hog........

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