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Here in Iowa the weather the last 2 days has been. Friday 41|31 sat 52|28 Sunday 52|35 and Monday will be 68|46 mostly sunny so my question is I’m trying to understand how to weather affects bass. So how would Monday be fishing wise I’m assuming it would jump start the fish to be active again?

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I think the weather has more impact on the fisherman than the fish. If I'm resigned that I'm not going to do well I usually don't. Some of my best days were during some of the least favorable weather conditions.  That said I have found that a sunny, calm, post frontal condition is really tough. I always seem to do best when there's at least a breeze. Good luck.

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   I went to Lake Darling Wednesday and was catching them in the rocks in the shallower side. I caught 9 using a Bomber 13a, snapped and jerked at a pretty good pace. I also got a couple on a 1/3 oz nickel spoon, and a green Yumdinger. I went down to Keokuk and got 6 on the Bomber again, fishing the warmer sections of water in a big pond.

   Now all but 3 were dinks, but this time of year fish are fish to me, dinks or not.

   Everyone said that it was too cold to be fishing as fast as I was fishing. And everyone said the wind was too wicked, that the fish wouldn't bite.

   Obviously, the fish didn't know that.

   BTW I also tried my new flukes, some Super Spots, larger 15a lures, and Rapala Shadow raps. Nothing.

   I'm gonna go out tomorrow. I'll use the Bomber, several spoons, and some soft plastic. Do I know whether I'll have good luck? No, I don't. But I'll sure try. No matter the wind, the temp, the barometric pressure or what happened yesterday, you have to go out there and try in order to see what will or won't work.

   Armchair theories don't amount to much.     jj

  

  

  

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About a month ago I fished out of my kayak, 44 degree water, 32 degree air, middle of a snow storm that dumped 3 inches of snow.  I caught 9 bass in less than 6 feet of water in 90 minutes.  Once the snow stopped so did the bite. 

 

I go fishing when I have the free time. 

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5 hours ago, GoneFishingLTN said:

Here in Iowa the weather the last 2 days has been. Friday 41|31 sat 52|28 Sunday 52|35 and Monday will be 68|46 mostly sunny so my question is I’m trying to understand how to weather affects bass. So how would Monday be fishing wise I’m assuming it would jump start the fish to be active again?

You could choose to fish any of those days and if you give us an idea of the water temp, water clarity, and whether the water level is rising, falling, or steady and we could probably give you better suggestions.  If you choose the sunny day and your water is like mine (muddy, high 50's, high water) then I would go in the afternoon, pick the side of the lake that has gotten the most sun all day, and fish extremely shallow with something very flappy and very smelly.  Notice @jimmyjoe was fishing shallow rocks because his water has been cold and the rocks will hold heat.  If your water is cold look for rocks and wood that will hold heat.  Like @The Bassman said, it's all about what the fish are feeling, not what you are feeling.  Kind of like being married. 

 

And yes, flappy is a word.  In my own personal fishing dictionary.  

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How far  north in Iowa are you ? I'm not that far from the Iowa border and last week the bass fishing was excellent with spinnerbaits shallow in bays , coves and pockets .

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You want a "steady" temperature for three to four days so the bass will behavior as they are supposed to based on water clarity and water temperature.

 

The barometric pressure also has an impact on what the bass do.

 

Then, add in the sun warming the water or structure in the water and you have your menu to use to determine where the bass will be (or supposed to be); and the water temperature. Then add in the water column's clarity; time of the year; the time of day; the wind; the forage; clouds; the sun; water clarity; and other factors that impact the bass' behavior.

 

Here is the take on your air temperatures as you published:

Friday 41|31

Saturday 52|28

Sunday 52|35

Monday  68|46

 

You have a "warming trend" which means the bass will becoming more active and start their spawning efforts when the water warms up into the low 60's.

 

Now, with all of the above penned, do you know the water temperature? After all, you are fishing in the water where the fish live and that is the only temperature that matters. Once you use your pool thermometer to obtain the water temperature you are ready to decide what the bass are doing and what you should throw and at in what water columns.

 

See how easy it is. :D

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Take average air temps, delay them by ~2days -or take previous 2 day's average, and that should ballpark the near-ST's (top 3fow) in your lake, barring big winds at play. This is helpful, for ballparking presentation stuff. What you need to know to ballpark the stage the season, is to get a bead on the "core" temperature of the lake, or lake area, you'll be fishing. That is, take a temperature at depth (my waters are shallow so I shoot for ~8-10ft; This coudl be AOK in a larger lake but watch out for hydrographical aspect to big winds).

 

In my waters, and many others it appears, if it is <48F you are still in "winter", or in neat-transition from. If it is above you are coming into what I call the pre-spawn "feeding binge" period. When it hits 55F, you are transitioning from binge into the spawn. If it is >58F at the depth spawning beds are laid in your lake, you can expect the first wave of spawners. The reason you need to track core temps is bc surface temps can lead you astray. They do not lead the fish astray, or many of them, for something so critical as when eggs are laid.

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Air temperature means nothing it's all about water temperatures warming during pre spawn. Every lake warms differently depending on depth, current, wind and air temperature that warm the water slowly. Storm fronts are part of pre spawn. Cold rain drops water temps faster then cold air unless the air is windy.

Your nights are very cold with warming day temperatures, storm fronts need to subside before any major spawn occurs. 

What are you water temps?

Tom

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Tom, with all due respect, and I do greatly respect your experience, knowledge, and insight. The work you've done with real temperatures and bass was ground-breaking. Hats off to anyone who'll put rubber to the ground in figuring stuff out. But, here, I have to rebut... in the spirit of what this discussion forum is for. And to clarify my seeming rather bold statement.

19 hours ago, WRB said:

Air temperature means nothing it's all about water temperatures warming during pre spawn.

Not so!

19 hours ago, WRB said:

Every lake warms differently depending on depth, current, wind and air temperature that warm the water slowly.

This such a statement isn’t terribly helpful. It pretty much waves away the question asked.

 

Everything, air, and water alike, are heated by the sun. (Not many of our bass lakes are affected by volcanic geothermal activity.) Air warms and cools faster than water. Water, with its uniquely high specific heat, much slower, in both directions. In other words it both resists, and holds onto, heat. 

 

In my small waters, and in protected coves, lagoons, backwaters, canals, marinas, and many shorelines, in larger lakes, water temps do indeed follow air temps. This is because the same forces are heating and cooling both, at the same time. But due to its specific heat, water lags behind air, at both ends: gain and loss.

 

“Protected” means, protected from the massive core of cold water that developed over winter, as heating mostly happens at the surface and deep water really lags behind the upper layer, and the air. Notice, that these protected coves, lagoons, backwaters, canals, marinas, and shorelines, are where bass spawn. It’s also where one can expect heating and food chain activation. Together, these areas can serve as a magnet for fish this time of year. How do lakes heat? Slowly, overall. But, shallow protected areas accrue heat as the sun comes back through spring. And it holds onto it. While air temps may have us wearing coats at times, water doesn’t react so quickly. There is a lag, of a day or so. 

 

Protected areas are protected from from convection (wind, and current) and are "free" to take and lose heat compared to core water. In the spring, the trend is inexorably upwards. This doesn’t mean that a frigid cold front, cold rain (or snow, as we have here) won’t affect water temps. But MUCH less than most people seem to think. And it bounces back fast, because of the heating power of the sun (angle and duration). And because the water is actually storing that heat creating a buffer from the rapidly cooling (and heating air, hence the ~2-day delay. The march toward summer is inexorable. Dented here and there, but will not be denied.

 

To track it has been some work. I've been taking temperature profiles, to learn me how heat penetrates, and distributes in lakes. The different ways heat distributes (radiation, conduction, and convection) vary in power to change temperatures in a given volume of water. The buffering is greater as we go deeper; Deep water is nearly impervious to atmospheric changes. It’s difficult for a water system -even snow- to drastically affect water temps as we descend -very far- from the surface. What changes it most drastically, is mixing (convection) with core water via wind, or incoming currents. Sans these, water follows air, which follows the sun. If we know this, we can actually make some predictions.

 

If we track water temps in protected areas, or core areas for that matter, (but not where both have immediate access to each other), I've found that water temps follow mean air temps. Yes, areas of lakes vary in temperature. But water itself doesn’t vary appreciably in its ability to heat. And it does so via radiation, conduction, and convection.

 

19 hours ago, WRB said:

Every lake warms differently depending on depth, current, wind and air temperature that warm the water slowly.

This is generally true. Very generally. Fronts are part of the spawn too. But, by then, those protected areas (and into a certain depth, say, in a small pond) have sucked in enough heat to be able to buffer those fronts. A certain amount of heat accrual, and associated temperature stability, appears to me to be what bass are looking for, to initiate the spawn.

 

So, its true that the spawn is “run by photoperiod”, but very generally. In terms of the activity —the metabolic expenditures— required to spawn, photoperiod may light the fuse, but heat makes it burn. But, water body by water body, and areas within each, vary in how much heat they can absorb. That’s what’s happening out there, and what we might want to track as we fish the transition seasons. Air temps can tell us a lot, if we know what they can tell us.

 

And, yeah, it takes a bit of work to track it. Eventually, we can develop a feel for how quickly water takes on and gives up heat. That’s kind of the core of the issue. From there, we need to find the areas that are protected from the core water. An awful lot of bass sure do. If not -if they choose to spawn (and can be successful at it) along shorelines near core water -they spawn very late in the season. It’s pretty much why the opener of bass season has always been the third Saturday in June, in my old home state of NY. Enough deep cold lakes in that state to warrant it. But, while  many bass in the Finger Lakes (400-600ft deep, with nearly vertical walls) are waiting for temperature stability, local pond bass are long done.

 

Mean air temps, with a day or two lag, can give you a ballpark idea of protected shallows (<10fow), where a large percentage of our bass fishing occurs during the transition seasons. I know that's a bold statement, but it works in my small waters, protected areas in bigger lakes, and I've even used it to run down anomalous catches in fishing reports, who report activity that doesn't appear to jive with that day's weather. But a look at the previous few days weather in their area -isn't the internet amazing!- reveals something not so out if the ordinary.

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Air temps means nothing was over the top, my thinking is clouded by extreme stress at the moment.

My intent was point out bass live in water not air and anglers tend to think both are closely the same due to thermal conductivity and that somewhat true but water warms very slowly compared to air and retains temperatures far longer. Today anglers tend measure water temps only as deep as the transducer temp probe extends into the surface water. Bass don't live n the water surface, usually much deeper where the water temps are much  cooler during pre spawn through fall.

Peace,

Tom

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Last week's temps really affected the bite in Iowa last week.  I went last Saturday and the bass were fairly active with water temps being in the mid 50's.  After a week of cold weather the water temps dropped 10 degrees and really changed how the bass were biting.  If you follow Facebook groups for different lakes in Iowa you'll see trends across the state.

 

There was a kayak tourney on Lake Icaria Saturday and they really struggled.  Only 11 of the 57 anglers caught fish and no one caught a limit.  There were some nice size bass caught but not many overall.

 

We really need to get back on track with some consistent rising temps. 

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22 minutes ago, Hawkeye21 said:

Last week's temps really affected the bite in Iowa last week.  I went last Saturday and the bass were fairly active with water temps being in the mid 50's.  After a week of cold weather the water temps dropped 10 degrees and really changed how the bass were biting.  If you follow Facebook groups for different lakes in Iowa you'll see trends across the state.

 

There was a kayak tourney on Lake Icaria Saturday and they really struggled.  Only 11 of the 57 anglers caught fish and no one caught a limit.  There were some nice size bass caught but not many overall.

 

We really need to get back on track with some consistent rising temps. 

I'd agree on the first paragraph, I'm also here in IA.  I did pretty well last Saturday(Apr. 6) with a Super Spot.  Then, we had days of colder temps again.

 

I tried a pond yesterday with a friend; it was fairly slow fishing, in my mind due to the cold front clear-out conditions, and the water temps being much lower than they were a week ago.  Around here, I'd guess they went from low 50's the previous weekend to mid 40's yesterday.  He caught just one nice fish on a jig/craw, and I lost one on jig/craw.  I did finally stick one with a #5 Shad Rap.

 

With the next two days looking to be around 70 degrees for highs, I'd be willing to bet by tomorrow afternoon they will be a lot more active and looking to chase baits a little more.

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2 minutes ago, Pickle_Power said:

I'd agree on the first paragraph, I'm also here in IA.  I did pretty well last Saturday(Apr. 6) with a Super Spot.  Then, we had days of colder temps again.

 

I tried a pond yesterday with a friend; it was fairly slow fishing, in my mind due to the cold front clear-out conditions, and the water temps being much lower than they were a week ago.  Around here, I'd guess they went from low 50's the previous weekend to mid 40's yesterday.  He caught just one nice fish on a jig/craw, and I lost one on jig/craw.  I did finally stick one with a #5 Shad Rap.

 

With the next two days looking to be around 70 degrees for highs, I'd be willing to bet by tomorrow afternoon they will be a lot more active and looking to chase baits a little more.

I think it's going to take a little longer than a day.  It was 27 degrees this morning and will only be a high in the 50's.  We're going to need temps above 60 and some sunshine for a few days to get those water temps back up to where they were.  The over night temps have not been helping either.

 

I'm hoping to get out again Friday afternoon, possibly on Easter as well.

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Agreed, one day is not likely to make a huge dent in heat gain. Although, it certainly may be enough to spur activity, in the upper water column/shallows, esp this time of year when the sun is as high as it is now.

 

I just returned from a trip that saw its first 70+F day of the year, following a generally cold spring. Surface temps hit 55F across the lake. One shallow bay with a shallow sprawling inlet, hit 64F! No, the bass weren't spawning; The little lake's core -the mass of it- was 51F. The very next day a front rolled in and the air dipped into the 40s, and I ended up in a down jacket, hat, and fingerless gloves, and still wished I hadn't left my fleece in the truck. Surface temps lost only a single degree over the course of the day though. That would change when the freezing rain came that night. But I was outta there.

 

I did my damage on big females the day before the 75F one, and the day after, on the 45F one. I lost track of them during that hot spell. I have a darn good guess as to where they went, but, I didn't know the lake well enough to follow. Won't make that mistake again. I mapped out that creek channel.

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5 hours ago, Hawkeye21 said:

I think it's going to take a little longer than a day.  It was 27 degrees this morning and will only be a high in the 50's.  We're going to need temps above 60 and some sunshine for a few days to get those water temps back up to where they were.  The over night temps have not been helping either.

 

I'm hoping to get out again Friday afternoon, possibly on Easter as well.

50's?  Poppycock, it's about 70 here now and will be about the same tomorrow afternoon. About 45 for an overnight low here.  I guarantee it will be better tomorrow than it was yesterday, which is what I said to begin with...

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9 minutes ago, Pickle_Power said:

50's?  Poppycock, it's about 70 here now and will be about the same tomorrow afternoon. About 45 for an overnight low here.  I guarantee it will be better tomorrow than it was yesterday, which is what I said to begin with...

It did warm up nicely today but I don't think it's gotten to 60 here today.  I'm by Dubuque.  Water temps should warm up in the next couple days but then overnight temps in the upper 30s again Thursday and Friday night.  Next week's forecast looks to be more consistent so hopefully that helps.

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I fish whenever I can regardless of weather conditions.  I will pick a location considering the weather predicted.  The two things that will keep me at home are predicted thunderstorms, and winds above 15 MPH with gusts above that.  I personally hate battling strong winds constantly on the T/M.  I fish for fun, and wind will keep me at the house.  With thunderstorms I do have a spot with bridges every mile that I can duck under and tie up if lightning is apparent. I have done that many times. 

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On 4/14/2019 at 8:17 AM, The Bassman said:

If I'm resigned that I'm not going to do well I usually don't.

I’m always certain I’m going to be bailing them left and right. No matter how terrible it is. And then I wind up making it a whole day. 

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I fish when I can get out on the water. I don’t like it when a front moves through the day before, but l’m not going to stay home because of it. 

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4 hours ago, Bankbeater said:

I fish when I can get out on the water. I don’t like it when a front moves through the day before, but l’m not going to stay home because of it. 

   Right! That's how a person learns. And believe me, I'm still learning.  😁   jj

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