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I'm a huge Daiwa guy. Just ordered a couple parts from Daiwa because my son dropped my Tatula CT and cracked the side plate and scuffed up the brake dial. Total cost was $18 including shipping, but they are both backordered and won't be here for 2-6 months.

 

I'm in the market for a new reel as we speak and tried a couple different Lews reels. They just don't feel as nice as other reels especially for the price. The Custom (white model, forget the name exactly) felt rather cheap for a reel that sells for $180. 

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Lew Childre was the designer of the original BB1's back in the early 70's. The company never did manufacture the rods or reels. They were farmed out to Shimano and Ryobi and I believe there may have been a third. They were about the only competition Abu had at the time.

 Mr .Childre was killed in the late 70's in a plane crash.

 Today they are Lew's in name only . I will say they do a great job of marketing but I've never been overly impressed with them.

 I would buy a Daiwa or Shimano personally.

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I'll be fishing with the product development manager for Lews next week and I'll ask him if you want but I think I know what his answer will be.  :lol:

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39 minutes ago, TOXIC said:

I'll be fishing with the product development manager for Lews next week and I'll ask him if you want but I think I know what his answer will be.  :lol:

Im just not clear on what Lews does. From what ive read here on this forum is that they just re brand reels but in reviews like the one ive read on ***, they write that their Pro Ti was a reel  to show off what they can do in design.  so that has made me a little unclear in how much input besides cosmetics they have.

 

what about Lews rods? who makes or designs them?

 

 

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Normally, how they source their products (that goes for anyone in the fishing industry) is a secret held close to the vest.  You will never get anyone with any real knowledge to reveal those type of details.  There's so many that claim to have the inside scoop that you get 100 different stories.  I would never ask anyone in the manufacturing business to disclose that type of info.  It would be bad form.  ;)

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10 minutes ago, TOXIC said:

Normally, how they source their products (that goes for anyone in the fishing industry) is a secret held close to the vest.  You will never get anyone with any real knowledge to reveal those type of details.  There's so many that claim to have the inside scoop that you get 100 different stories.  I would never ask anyone in the manufacturing business to disclose that type of info.  It would be bad form.  ;)

I’m just one potential customer but this issue is the primary driver in my purchasing decisions.   There are too many companies in this industry that do nothing but market the same Asian made stuff as everyone else.   In most cases it’s almost impossible to know the story on who designed and who manufactured a product.  My thinking is if you don’t want me to know the story it’s because you have something to hide.   It’s pretty clear with companies like St Croix that they are very proud of where their products come from.  Go to their website and you can see the names and pictures of the people that made your rod.   That’s why I’m a loyal St. Croix customer.  

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17 hours ago, BaitFinesse said:

Lews doesn't design reels.  They order their reels from Doyo Korea from Doyo product lines.  They are built and badged as Lews in both Korean and Chinease Doyo plants then sold in the US.

http://doyofishing.co.kr/main/index?setMode=pc

ahh okay, i was under the understanding that they did but had outsourced the building.

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1 hour ago, Tennessee Boy said:

I’m just one potential customer but this issue is the primary driver in my purchasing decisions.   There are too many companies in this industry that do nothing but market the same Asian made stuff as everyone else.   In most cases it’s almost impossible to know the story on who designed and who manufactured a product.  My thinking is if you don’t want me to know the story it’s because you have something to hide.   It’s pretty clear with companies like St Croix that they are very proud of where their products come from.  Go to their website and you can see the names and pictures of the people that made your rod.   That’s why I’m a loyal St. Croix customer.  

Oh, I don't have a problem with people knowing.  I have a problem with people spreading innuendo and untrue information about a product.  My question to someone who supposedly knows the information would be "And you know this how?"

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23 minutes ago, TOXIC said:

Oh, I don't have a problem with people knowing.  I have a problem with people spreading innuendo and untrue information about a product.  My question to someone who supposedly knows the information would be "And you know this how?"

Let me clarify in case you miss understood me.  When I used the word “you” I was referring to anyone in the industry that does not want to reveal the source of their products.  I was not referring to you specifically.  I agree there’s a lot of misinformation out there and it’s impossible to know the truth in most cases.   Designed in house might mean they picked the color of the reel they ordered on madeinchina.com.

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My buddy owns a fly fishing company.  He is an engineer.  He actually designed the jets for the fuel injection for the truck I drive.  He designs the fly reels, and sends the specs/schematics/CAD-CAM or whatever he uses to a Chinese manufacturer.  Several, actually.  They provide samples of their work.  He picks a company that he thinks is capable of the QC he desires, and negotiates a deal on a large run.  He's definitely NOT just rebranding reels that already exist.  It's roughly the same process for rods, but a little different. Much of the product gets sent to Amazon fulfillment centers, while some of the more specialized tackle is either made in house, like hand made furled leaders or actual flies, and warehoused in house.  He's been doing this for around a decade.  I'm not saying this is how EVERYONE does business, but this is his model. 

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23 minutes ago, J Francho said:

My buddy owns a fly fishing company.  He is an engineer.  He actually designed the jets for the fuel injection for the truck I drive.  He designs the fly reels, and sends the specs/schematics/CAD-CAM or whatever he uses to a Chinese manufacturer.  Several, actually.  They provide samples of their work.  He picks a company that he thinks is capable of the QC he desires, and negotiates a deal on a large run.  He's definitely NOT just rebranding reels that already exist.  It's roughly the same process for rods, but a little different. Much of the product gets sent to Amazon fulfillment centers, while some of the more specialized tackle is either made in house, like hand made furled leaders or actual flies, and warehoused in house.  He's been doing this for around a decade.  I'm not saying this is how EVERYONE does business, but this is his model. 

It sounds like your buddy’s expertise is his engineering skills and his love/knowledge of fly fishing.  He farms out the manufacturing to Asia and fulfillment to Amazon.   That’s the type of people I want to buy from.  An understanding of what anglers need and the ability to engineer a product to meet those needs translates into a product that improves my fishing experience.   Someone who’s expertise is marketing might sell you a lot of product but won’t do anything to improve your fishing.  No company can survive without marketing but there is a difference between fishing companies that farm out the marketing and marketing companies that farm out the fishing stuff.  I want to do all I can to support the fishing industry not the marketing industry.

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Both Daiwa and Shimano are brick and mortar American Corps located in SoCal, Cypress and Irvine, the parent Corps are in Japan. Lew's is a brand not a Corporation.

What does that mean? You can always contact employee's and know spare parts are available along with repairs services from both Daiwa and Shimano.

Lew's has been sold several times the past decade and still remains a good product but lacks the quality product support available from Daiwa or Shimano.

Tom

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Daiwa by far. Their only competition is Shimano, and I still prefer Daiwa to them. I'd sooner be an Abu fanboy than purposefully buy Lews.

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39 minutes ago, Tennessee Boy said:

It sounds like your buddy’s expertise is his engineering skills and his love/knowledge of fly fishing.  He farms out the manufacturing to Asia and fulfillment to Amazon.   That’s the type of people I want to buy from.  An understanding of what anglers need and the ability to engineer a product to meet those needs translates into a product that improves my fishing experience.   Someone who’s expertise is marketing might sell you a lot of product but won’t do anything to improve your fishing.  No company can survive without marketing but there is a difference between fishing companies that farm out the marketing and marketing companies that farm out the fishing stuff.  I want to do all I can to support the fishing industry not the marketing industry.

Funny story.  We were Boy Scouts together.  His mom was the den mother.  We hosted all the kids at our cottage for a fishing badge.  I gave Eric an old tackle box and some lures.  We were probably only 8 years old, but he was hooked.  Later he found he had a great grandfather that was a noted fly fisherman, and got interested in that aspect.   I just ran into him after dinner on Mother's day.  Seems like Mexican is a popular choice, lol.  If you're interested in it, here's the Amazon Store front:

https://www.amazon.com/stores/page/7E6CD6D2-3B02-4355-8458-F94075821D1E?ingress=2&visitId=91aa58d9-0abf-4465-972d-0eef68f79c96&ref_=bl_dp_s_web_13180987011

 

And the website:

https://www.wildwaterflyfishing.com/

 

Sorry for the off topic stuff.  Just throwing in what I know about off shore sourced tackle. 

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1 hour ago, WRB said:

Lew's has been sold several times the past decade and still remains a good product but lacks the quality product support available from Daiwa or Shimano.

Tom

The Lew’s brand is under the ownership of Peak Rock Capital (A middle market private equity firm) and longtime Childre family friend Lynn Reeves serves as the CEO.

 

I agree the product is good. Their marketing is good as well as customer service. As far as product support, my experience has been great for getting spare spools. For those that want to keep their reels going for decades only time will tell if the parts will be available. I recall reading threads on these forums that some people were having problems finding parts for Shimano reels that were no longer in production. I assume the same would be true for most brands.

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I dont care where it’s made, the Lews LFS is a dang good reel for around $80. But that’s about where I draw the line in the sand.

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36 minutes ago, NYWayfarer said:

 I recall reading threads on these forums that some people were having problems finding parts for Shimano reels that were no longer in production.

This is because Shimano USA has to buy the parts in advance from Shimano Japan.  This means they simply cannot keep ordering parts for reels that are aged out.  You can usually get parts for a few years after a model has been discontinued.  At that point, you're other option is to buy used, donor reels.  I've done this to restore several older reels.  Sometimes I buy a broken reel if the part I need is good, or if it's a notable reel.  Old Abus, Shimanos, Diawas often have parts that are useful for old reels still in action.

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If you need Shimano reel parts that Shimano doesn't have Reel Ex carries parts dating back 30 years. I am not aware of a tech service for Daiwa similar to Reel Ex. Randy my local tech passed away last year. I know Randy had a net work of contacts for most reel parts he serviced in lieu of scavenging parts from other reels. There is always after market parts for higher quality reels. 

I own a vintage Lew's Speed Spool BB1 made by Shimano, haven't used it in decades.

Tom

 

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Thanks for your advice gentlemen. I'm a high school angler and just started fishing a year ago.I wanted to know your opinion on these brands. I wish I could buy and feel to build my own preference but I dont have that kind of money. I hear diawa is good and same for lews and vice versa. Still not sure what I want to get. Thanks for your help!!!

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23 hours ago, TOXIC said:

I'll be fishing with the product development manager for Lews next week and I'll ask him if you want but I think I know what his answer will be.  :lol:

Please do ask and post it in a separate post . Thank you. I'd buy Lew's over any other reel.

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Best way to know is to try as many as you can.  

 

After owning lots of brands of reels, if it were my money, I would buy Daiwa over Lew's.  I had a couple Lew's reels and they both had qualities that really annoyed me.  Have several Daiwa reels and I'll buy more in the future.

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Got out yesterday for my first chance at using my Diawa Fuego. Easy to 'tune in', smooth casts, only one birdsnest when I changed lures and forgot to adjust the brake for the lighter lure. I'd buy one again.

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12 hours ago, MN Fisher said:

Got out yesterday for my first chance at using my Diawa Fuego. Easy to 'tune in', smooth casts, only one birdsnest when I changed lures and forgot to adjust the brake for the lighter lure. I'd buy one again.

Branching out into casting gear?  How do you like it so far?

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