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Eran

Why do reels have fillets

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Hi all, 

 

I'm a mechanical engineer, always loved fishing but never had the time (and money, mostly) to make a real fishing hobby. 

 

Lately I have been designing a reel for a product Im working on. Half way throu, I remembered fishing reels have big fillets, large radius near the reel walls. 

Why is that? 

I cant find a single reason. why not make a small fillet or no fillet at all? As I see it, the fillet only takes line volum. 

 

add a picture for example. 

Can anyone please explain? 

 

IMG_20190725_194828.jpg

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I assume you're talking about the walls of the spool? That is what contains the line and keeps it from rubbing on the side of reel or coming unspooled when you take the spool out. Without those high sides the line would get damaged and tangled.

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14 minutes ago, Jrob78 said:

I assume you're talking about the walls of the spool? That is what contains the line and keeps it from rubbing on the side of reel or coming unspooled when you take the spool out. Without those high sides the line would get damaged and tangled.

I think he's more talking about the curved transition between the hub and the walls.

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3 minutes ago, MN Fisher said:

I think he's more talking about the curved transition between the hub and the walls.

Yeah maybe, the post isn't very clear.

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I'm assuming that the fillet as you call it is there to help with the line lay on the spool when installing new line or winding in from casting or trolling. 

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Just now, Jrob78 said:

Yeah maybe, the post isn't very clear.

It's what the arrow is pointing at.

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4 minutes ago, MN Fisher said:

It's what the arrow is pointing at.

Yeah you're right. Most bass spools don't have a large "fillet" though. I assume the deeper the spool the more it needs a gentle transition to the spool wall instead of a 90 degree angle. At any rate, I don't think this is a problem or robs you of much line volume.

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4 minutes ago, Jrob78 said:

Yeah you're right. Most bass spools don't have a large "fillet" though. I assume the deeper the spool the more it needs a gentle transition to the spool wall instead of a 90 degree angle. At any rate, I don't think this is a problem or robs you of much line volume.

I think it has to do with the molding process. Plastic and aluminum spools are cast in 4-part molds IIRC - the aluminum ones anodized after de-burring. The fillet allows an easier separation when the molding process is complete. They also engineer specific line capacity, taking into account the fillet. If it went to a square transition, you might gain 10-15 yds of 12-14lb test, but it's really a non-issue.

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Can you please pm me where you got your engineering degree so I don't send anyone I know there.

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In olden times, Ryobi marketed a V spool on some of their reels and another brand, Diawa I think, marketed a  U shaped spool.  I remember seeing some Lew's V spools as well.   As I recall, the shape of the spool was mostly to differentiate them from other brands of reels and maybe reduce the chances of a backlash.  It might have helped a little, but it didn't replace an educated thumb.  On the one little Ryobi I owned for a time, the V spool diminished line capacity quite a bit, and this was a good thing because I could get 2 or 3 fills out of a spool of Berkley Trilene.  I wish I had that old Ryobi reel back, but it got stolen.  I never knew that the transition area from the shaft of the spool to the wall of the spool was called a "fillet".  Now I do

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I can see the OP's point. Once the spool is filled above the sloped fillet as he calls it, the line goes right against the side walls of the spool and it isn't an issue at that point so why would it be an issue when the spool is empty?

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2 hours ago, Jrob78 said:

Yeah maybe, the post isn't very clear.

I think it's probably a poor translation. I think what they're saying is this:

 

Hi, I'm an engineer in another country copying a reel we plan to sell for a fraction of the cost. We can reduce our per unit manufacturing cost by $.00001 if we can eliminate the fillet on the spool.

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48 minutes ago, fin said:

I think it's probably a poor translation. I think what they're saying is this:

 

Hi, I'm an engineer in another country copying a reel we plan to sell for a fraction of the cost. We can reduce our per unit manufacturing cost by $.00001 if we can eliminate the fillet on the spool.

   Yeah, his profile doesn't have much info, does it?    jj

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Dang. I have no idea. But welcome aboard!

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You are a ME and don't know why a fillet radius is incorporated in reel line spools? 

Fillet radii that equals 1/2 the arbor diameter on deep spools increases strength and material flow for molded parts. Deep spools the large fillet starts the line to wind on evenly and yes it reduces line capacity. If you look at the spool out of the reel you will see a smaller radii inside the spool that equals the wall thickness of the spool end flanges to prevent sinks as the molded spool cools and ribs for added strength without adding too much weight.

Tom

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7 minutes ago, WRB said:

You are a ME and don't know why a fillet radius is incorporated in reel line spools? 

Fillet radii that equals 1/2 the arbor diameter on deep spools increases strength and material flow for molded parts. Deep spools the large fillet starts the line to wind on evenly and yes it reduces line capacity. If you look at the spool out of the reel you will see a smaller radii inside the spool that equals the wall thickness of the spool end flanges to prevent sinks as the molded spool cools and ribs for added strength without adding too much weight.

Tom

Yup, added strength and reduced weight. Can a reel that is machined be forged? and if so can I get my money back if it isn't casted? and will I have to pay for the stamp to send it back? cause I'm tapped out and someone may dye. :) 

 

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22 hours ago, Eran said:

Why do reels have fillets

Because they can't have scaled and gutted...

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