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Flatrock

Stupid pitching question

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I think I finally have my casting under control and I'm ready to take the next step with pitching and flipping.

I'm looking for some tips in pitching, like reel setup.  Do I need to have my spool loose ?  And what is a normal distance..  I mean 10...20 ... yrds ?  And what about jig weight, 3/8 or 1/2oz ?   I realize these are lame questions, but I'm trying to be realistic in my expectations.

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The spool tension needs to be fairly loose. Distance is all dependent on how far you're trying to get it. I'd guess an average pitch for me is in the 5-10 yard range. Bait weight can vary from 1/4oz, possibly less, up to an ounce and maybe a little more.

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In general I find that heavier baits are easier to control.

 

Spool tension does need to be somewhat loose. A trick to keep backlash down can be to pitch a heavy bait as far as you can, then pull a little more line off of the spool, then place some electrical tape on the spool to keep the rest of the line under control. Good luck.

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Pitching is a lot easier from a raised deck . I do it a lot from a john boat , so I'm standing at water level with gun-wells in the way .In that case   a heavier weight is needed , at least for me it is . I like to use a 1/4 ounce weight and a Senko type worm that has a lot of heft to it . 

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Start with a spinning setup to avoid backlashes until you get the "feel" of how to pitch and flip.

 

I mostly flip and pitch with a spinning rig as these are "close in" presentations as compared to a baitcaster and its distance.

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8 hours ago, Flatrock said:

And what about jig weight, 3/8 or 1/2oz ?

I pitch Ned Rigs on 1/15th heads.  The critical thing is matching your gear.  I can accurately pitch a Ned Rig 15 yards but only on a spinning reel with 6lb trilene XL.  If I put that Ned on my frog rod it wouldn't go anywhere.  

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Second the raised surface comment. Another tip I tell others is to only use your wrist as the pivot point for the rod, dont put your whole arm into it. Like anything, start short and work your way out with practice and time. My average pitch is around 10 yards, but sometimes pitch up to 20 if need be. I like a 1/2 ounce jig with full size craw trailer. (Rage craw, menace, pit boss)

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If you are pitching correctly where the lure stays close to the water, 14 to 15 yards is probably the max distance you can reach with a heavier jig and baitcasting equipment.  If you lob it somewhat in the pitch you can cast further, but then that would defeat the purpose of why you use the technique in the first place (i.e. quiet entry into the water in tight places).  

 

1 hour ago, CroakHunter said:

Another tip I tell others is to only use your wrist as the pivot point for the rod, dont put your whole arm into it.

 

You can use your elbow as the pivot point and still achieve the same effect.  I have a fused right wrist and had to learn a new pitching motion because my wrist does not bend.  I have to use the elbow and I am able to pitch effectively.  It just takes practice however you do it.

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Watch some youtube tutorials on it. Once you get the knack for it you'll be flipping and pitching accurately and not-so-awkwardly with a bait caster and jig in 30 days.

 

I just taught my good friend this year how to do it and that's how long it took him to pretty much get it down. Now after 60 days or so he's really good. Looks very natural. When you've been doing it for years like some of us on here, it will be so second nature you won't even think about it. I can flip a bait sideways, I can flip a weightless wacky rig, I can flip a bait under a dock while skipping it across the top of the water, you name it. It's one of the biggest reasonS we use bait casters.

 

It's a combination of thumbing the spool at the same time as moving the entire rod (and your whole arm) to manipulate the bait's path of descent. The goal is to keep the bait as close to the water as possible from the second it leaves your hand and to get it into the water where you want it, and without making a giant splash. If your bait ever goes higher than your chest level, you're doing it wrong.

 

Watch some youtube, get on the water, practice. You can even practice in the back yard or better yet, off a raised deck or porch.

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Funny this thread came up. I was on vacation last week in Newport RI. Did a lot of drinking and not much fishing. Where I was staying has a 40' deck. I decided it was a good place to learn how to pitch. I pitched for 5 days on that deck, using mostly solo cups for targets. Got pretty good and realized why pitching is an important technique in your arsenal. 

 

I was in my kayak on Tuesday, I do not have a raised seat. Much more difficult from that position but totally doable. Keep practicing. 

 

I found it harder and much more involved to pitch with my spinning setup, I need to try that again.

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Pitching short target 10-20’ with wrist, that what I would learn first, use weight that you comfortable with. I found shorter rod make pitching easier. When you try to pitch longer distance like 10yds or more it combination of loading the rod, wrist and under-hand cast.

Watch tutorial on YouTube, I think the best I saw was Tactical basin of how to position your elbow wrist and how to load the rod for more distance.

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Flatrock, to add to this thread please consider the following when you are learning to flip and pitch with a baitcaster.

 

Set up the rod to pitch and flip as you wish and go outside.

 

Cast the bait about 10 to 15 yards and then pull out two arm lengths of line.

 

To stop backlashes from going deep into the baitcaster spool, use some Scotch tape or electrical tape and place it across the line on the spool. By doing this, you know you have the 10 to 15 yards plus the two arm lengths of line to pitch and flip knowing that if you do get a backlash it will stop at the tape.

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Thanks guys... I appreciate all the good tips.  I have watched several videos, however they don't talk about reel setup and weight to use while learning...   I know I tried a couple times only to find myself clearing a birds nest... so the piece of tape to keep the spool from unraveling during the initial learning process is a very good idea.. (thanks).  The few times I have tried, I was trying to pitch 30-50 feet..  here is the unrealistic expectation thing.  

 

I think this is the only time I wish I had cathedral ceilings.. 

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I learned to pitch several seasons ago.  It took most of a season to get comfortable with it.  At some point, when you're going for distance, a pitch becomes a roll cast which becomes a side arm cast.  There is a gradient/learning curve there.  Me, I seldom pitch more than 40 feet, longer than that it becomes a roll cast or a side arm cast.  Principles are similar in that you're trying to stay as low to the water as possible with as little a splash as possible.   Some guys make next to no splash - that ain't me.  

 

That being said, I wish I had learned to pitch first and then gradually moved to distance side arm/overhead casting.  My thumb would have been better trained and I would have spent less money on line overall.  You will back lash from time to time learning to pitch, however, in my experiences the back lash isn't as deep as when you really screw up trying for distance using an overhead cast.

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13 hours ago, BigAngus752 said:

I pitch Ned Rigs on 1/15th heads.  The critical thing is matching your gear.  I can accurately pitch a Ned Rig 15 yards but only on a spinning reel with 6lb trilene XL.  If I put that Ned on my frog rod it wouldn't go anywhere.  

This is a good point. I think most think pitching and automatically assume heavy line and casting gear. I pitch wacky rigs, Neds, and other light baits on spinning gear all the time. Learning how to do it with both casting and spinning gear is worth the effort. 

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Today I got brave and changed the internal pin settings on my Lews Tourn, turning them all off (factory had 2 pins on) and backed off on the spool.  I emptied the spool of line, not once but 6 times with no back lash, although it was wanting to so I adjust the magnet.  I was beside myself and wonder if I'll be able to have the same success on the water dealing with more adverse conditions like wind...  

 

I even started pitching without backlashing with reasonable accuracy (in the right area).  Then I tried roll pitching, if that is the right term..  I was building confidence then I got cocky and had a hell of a backlash, but was able to clear it up...  LOL   Definitely need more practice but I can see progress. 

I have to ask... Can you set just one internal pin or does it have to be in pairs ?

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Ull get different opinions on the brake thing. Some will say 1 is fine. I "prefer" to keep them in pairs or balanced I guess. I learned to pitch in my kitchen and back yard. I'd set up a coffee cup and just practice thru the winter.  Once u get the feel for it it becomes more natural. Still far from an expert at it but I do it a lot and there are times when it's the only way to present the bait in the right location.  Sounds like ur on the right track tho I'd just keep at it. I have found that daiwas braking system made it a lot easier for me to get distance without backlashes.  Good luck 

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When you start getting good at pitching don’t get put off if you have an off day. I usually pitch between 20’ and 30’, but there are some days I can’t hit the ground. 

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It is true that different conditions can affect your pitches.  For instance, pitching into the wind isn't quite the same as pitching with a side wind, or wind approaching from different angles.  Nothing serious, just might have to think about it for a moment prior to letting it fly. The good thing about fishing from a boat is that moving the boat is often an option.

 

The  aerodynamic features of any given bait affect your pitching success.  I've never been able, ( and I've looked ALOT), to find a bait that pitched as well as a practice plug.  On my deck, throwing a half ounce practice plug - I look like a master caster.  Put some soft plastic with a hook & weight on the end of my line and my pitching suffers some.  Just have to put in the time practicing and after a season or two it will become second nature and you can shift from pitch to roll cast, to side arm, overhead, interchangeably.   Then there will be days when you can't.  So you practice some more or live with it or both.

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Flipping docks is my absolute favorite. I use a 7' MH with 17lb floro and no bigger than 1/2 ounce tungsten. Get used to one reel for flipping and it will become muscle memory. 

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