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pauldconyers

Decent, cheap rubber boot

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First off, I had no idea in which forum to post this so if it needs to be moved that's totally cool. Needed some advice and figured someone could point me in a good direction here. I am looking for a pair of just below the knee rubber boots, primarily to get in the water when launching my boat at a few different lakes around here. Since I only plan on using them sparingly I do not want to pay much for them. Comfort is not so much an issue compared to traction as I expect to be on slick 45 degree boat ramps in the water lots of times. I saw these on sale for $30 at Academy. Is this a good buy or is there something different you'd point me to?

2019-09-10_10.00.44_50.jpg

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I do quite a bit of solo, no dock, boat launching; especially early season.

Boots are a part of that.

I'd encourage you to consider hip boots.

Really don't take up any more space, aren't any more trouble to get on & off than a standard 12 inch boot, but offer quite a bit more in the way of 'depth & dryness'.

Wet foot/leg is a bummer on a cold early morning. 

:smiley:

A-Jay

https://www.amazon.com/Green-Fishing-Wader-Cleated-Outsole/dp/B075Z2MLDN?ref_=ast_bbp_dp

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I have the ones in the screen shot, good shoes for the price. I've had them 3-4 years and keep them outside and they are still ok 

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I buy rubber boots at my local farm/home store. 39.00 per pair. These are 12 inch boots. In colder weather, I have Muck 12 Chore boots. Both work well

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19 hours ago, A-Jay said:

I do quite a bit of solo, no dock, boat launching; especially early season.

Boots are a part of that.

I'd encourage you to consider hip boots.

Really don't take up any more space, aren't any more trouble to get on & off than a standard 12 inch boot, but offer quite a bit more in the way of 'depth & dryness'.

Wet foot/leg is a bummer on a cold early morning. 

:smiley:

A-Jay

https://www.amazon.com/Green-Fishing-Wader-Cleated-Outsole/dp/B075Z2MLDN?ref_=ast_bbp_dp

This.

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I have the ones ike put up the link for. On the rare occasion that I need to go further out into the water, I step up onto the trailer. Actually, my Tracker doesn't need much depth to launch, so I've only had that happen on windy days when I was concerned a wave might swamp my boots.

If you have a deep V, or other boat that requires deeper water, skip the under the knee type and go with the hip boots.

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On 9/10/2019 at 10:49 AM, A-Jay said:

I do quite a bit of solo, no dock, boat launching; especially early season.

Boots are a part of that.

I'd encourage you to consider hip boots.

Really don't take up any more space, aren't any more trouble to get on & off than a standard 12 inch boot, but offer quite a bit more in the way of 'depth & dryness'.

Wet foot/leg is a bummer on a cold early morning. 

:smiley:

A-Jay

https://www.amazon.com/Green-Fishing-Wader-Cleated-Outsole/dp/B075Z2MLDN?ref_=ast_bbp_dp

I am having trouble envisioning how these work. So are there two of them that pull up your hip on each leg? Is the black little strap/loop I see at the top of them just to help you pull them up or do they go high enough to run your belt through so they don't fall down while walking? Paint me a picture here. Thanks!

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23 minutes ago, pauldconyers said:

I am having trouble envisioning how these work. So are there two of them that pull up your hip on each leg? Is the black little strap/loop I see at the top of them just to help you pull them up or do they go high enough to run your belt through so they don't fall down while walking? Paint me a picture here. Thanks!

Hip Waders

Hip waders are intended for water no deeper than knee-level. These are designed in two separate pieces, one for each leg. Each side attaches to your belt with straps to prevent them from sliding down, similar to chaps. Hip waders have several advantages:

The lightest option.

Easiest to put on and take off.

The most comfortable option in hot weather.

Ideal for smaller streams and shallows.

Easy to pack and great to have on hand for activities like launching and trailering boats, digging for clams, or hunting in boggy terrain.

 

A-Jay

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5 hours ago, A-Jay said:

Hip Waders

Hip waders are intended for water no deeper than knee-level. These are designed in two separate pieces, one for each leg. Each side attaches to your belt with straps to prevent them from sliding down, similar to chaps. Hip waders have several advantages:

The lightest option.

Easiest to put on and take off.

The most comfortable option in hot weather.

Ideal for smaller streams and shallows.

Easy to pack and great to have on hand for activities like launching and trailering boats, digging for clams, or hunting in boggy terrain.

 

A-Jay

If I was just wearing some athletic shorts that did not have a belt on them could I still wear these or without having a belt running through those straps with they really get away from you and be a problem?

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11 minutes ago, pauldconyers said:

If I was just wearing some athletic shorts that did not have a belt on them could I still wear these or without having a belt running through those straps with they really get away from you and be a problem?

The whole reason I'd be wearing this style of boot/wader is when the water & or air temps are super cold.

If it's decent enough to wear shorts - forget the hip boots and just jump in the water mate !

:smiley:

A-Jay

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1 minute ago, A-Jay said:

The whole reason I'd be wearing this style of boot/wader is when the water & or air temps are super cold.

If it's decent enough to wear shorts - forget the hip boots and just jump in the water mate !

:smiley:

A-Jay

Here in Missouri in the spring or fall there can be a lot of days where shorts are comfortable but getting in the water needlessly would not make you happy!

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15 hours ago, A-Jay said:

Hip Waders

Hip waders are intended for water no deeper than knee-level. These are designed in two separate pieces, one for each leg. Each side attaches to your belt with straps to prevent them from sliding down, similar to chaps. Hip waders have several advantages:

The lightest option.

Easiest to put on and take off.

The most comfortable option in hot weather.

Ideal for smaller streams and shallows.

Easy to pack and great to have on hand for activities like launching and trailering boats, digging for clams, or hunting in boggy terrain.

 

A-Jay

Also great for working the muskrat/otter/beaver trap line. 

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Was looking for some soccer socks for my 8 year old today at Dick's and I ran across these. Are these pretty much the same thing at the item recommended on Amazon? If so I might go back and unbox and try them on to see what's what for myself.

2019-09-12_09.08.43-1_50.jpg

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On 9/10/2019 at 10:15 AM, pauldconyers said:

Comfort is not so much an issue compared to traction as I expect to be on slick 45 degree boat ramps in the water lots of times.

 

With hip boots you could slip down on one knee & still be dry!

 

Caution: With hip boots if you are ever in a situation where you're in water over your head these can become an issue quickly.

 

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Just now, Catt said:

 

With hip boots you could slip down on one knee & still be dry!

 

Caution: With hip boots if you are ever in a situation where you're in water over your head these can become an issue quickly.

 

If water is over my head I've probably got bigger problems at that point...

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18 hours ago, pauldconyers said:

Was looking for some soccer socks for my 8 year old today at Dick's and I ran across these. Are these pretty much the same thing at the item recommended on Amazon? If so I might go back and unbox and try them on to see what's what for myself.

2019-09-12_09.08.43-1_50.jpg

I was looking for a solution to your exact problem earlier this year (March-ish), I kept getting water inside my "regular" fishing boots trying to get my little pond prowler loaded up once it was at water's edge (see pics below). 

 

Went to Dick's and found exactly what you found - I think they were on sale for 29.99 or maybe 24.99 I can't remember, doesn't matter. Decided to pull the trigger and thus far I've been very happy. I've stayed 100% dry and these aren't uncomfortable at all. 

 

I initially was taking them off inside the little boat once launched and swapping for more traditional footwear, doing the reverse on my way back to shore from fishing. But honestly as the season progressed I found I didn't mind just keeping them on unless it was too hot/sun beating relentlessly - then the plastic can get extremely hot and very uncomfortable. This also allowed me some extra space inside the little boat, not having to find a place to hide these. 

 

Pros:

-Easy enough to put on and take off

-I stay 100% dry

-Can stand and cast in them just fine, they are plenty comfortable

-Can beach my little boat in some remote little spots that aren't even accessible from shore, these make getting in and out of the boat simple, quick, and dry

-Wearing cargo pants underneath, the cut of the waders around the crotch area allows very easy access into side pockets and cargo pockets, where I keep a variety of things I use throughout the trip (sunblock, small & common terminal tackle, phone, bandanas, etc)

-Soles provide good traction

 

Cons:

-If it's hot outside and the sun is on full blast, these will get very hot and I wouldn't recommend wearing them the whole trip

-They can be a little bulky to store inside of a small vessel after launch (don't know what you're using) 

 

As far as durability I can't say a whole lot - I've had them out probably a dozen+ times this year. I use them in a reservoir with some unforgiving terrain, often launching around shale and rock. These have withstood the harsh terrain so far, which was my main concern initially. If you're launching around soft bottom exclusively then I wouldn't even hesitate recommending them.

 

Regardless of the brand you decide on, I 100% agree with what others said above that the hip waders are a really good option for this type of situation. Hope this helps. 

 

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