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Carmen J Bernardo

Q: Fishing Rod Size & Power for Different Presentations?

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Earlier today, I went through a general inventory of a collection of fishing rods while getting set up for the winter refitting and came up with at least 15 (!!) rods of different sizes and power ratings. All of these will be getting new line and some will get a new (better) reel appropriate for its respective characteristics. Although I have a general idea of how each rod could be used, I'm still unclear as to what each is best used for.

Each rod is listed below by increasing size or power rating:

Shakespeare SP 348-1UUL 4'8" ultra-ultra-light spinning

Shimano RX2500 5'6" ultra-light spinning

Berkeley H21 5'6" light spinning

Zebco GBC562ML 5'6" medium-light casting "Gatorback"

Zebco ZRC56M 5'6" medium casting "Rhino"

Renegade RTS 602UL 6'0" ultra-light spinning

Johnson JFS-1 6'0" medium-light spinning

Shakespeare SP2660-2M 6'0" medium spinning

Quantum QXLC 60M 6'0" medium casting

Shakespeare SP 860-1MH 6'0" medium-heavy spinning

Berkeley 6'6" medium spinning "Lightning" (model #s not legible)

Browning 6'6" medium casting "David Fritts Special"

St Croix GS66M2 6'6" medium spinning

Quantum EC66M 6'6" medium casting

Quantum QCS66MH 6'6" medium-heavy casting

Daiwa "Legacy" casting rod (model #s, size and power rating not

legible -- looks to be a 7-footer with a fairly fast tip)

I'm looking to replace the Johnson with a longer medium-light model from Cabela's tomorrow. The rest of the year will be spent getting new lines (I'm thinking primarily monofilament with a few braid lines for the heavier rods) and reels to replace older reels of lower quality or which no longer quite work as well as they used to. The whole process of refitting my tackle should take me through the winter to complete.

What has me confused at this point is the exact use for each of these. I've had a fairly good general use out of the light and ultra-light rods (specifically, the Renegade 6-footer), and the medium-power models (especially the St Croix) worked well in both clearwater stream and lakeside casting situations. If I were able to get out on the water more this season, there's a chance I'd have found some use for the stronger rods, especially in heavier cover or deeper lakes.

That being said, what are your suggestions for these old boys?

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RETIREMENT.

I agree. Why not start a new collection with the only three

rigs you really need?

1. Spinning rig: 6 1/2' or 7' Medium Power/ Fast Action;

     2500 series reel ( Symetre or Stradic CI4). For all weightless

     soft plastics and light lures.

2. Baitcasting: 6 1/2' or 7' Medium Power/ Moderate Action;

     Citica or Curado 200E7. For all treble hooks.

3. Baitcasting: 6 1/2' or 7' Heavy Power/ Fast Action; Citica or

     Curado. For jigs, weighted soft plastics and just about

      anything up to an ounce or so.

8-)

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If you sell them all and pitch in about 100 bucks you could buy a St Croix or Loomis rod.   ;D

Kidding aside, listen to Bass-Brat and RW.  Now is the perfect time to narrow those down to just a few rods that will do the job exponentially better.  If you can afford it.

If you can't afford it I'd say you could make due with the bottom half of the list starting with the Browning and retire the top half of the list.  

B

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Thanks for the quick replies.  Now that you've said it, I am thinking of narrowing down the selection quite a bit given how I'm not really using all of them.  I've actually gone out and brought a light combo from Cabela's on sale today:

Cabela's "Gold Label" GLS7022 - light/fast action spinning rod

   w/ matching reel (6:1 ball bearings, fits lines 8# to 12 #)

The Gold Label combo seems like a decent start.  The reel winds smoothly and has the continuous anti-reverse that I'm starting to appreciate in the newer, better models.  Many of the older reels that I'm considering getting rid of lack that, which may have contributed to much of the slack and birds' nests that set in as much as the aged and worn mono on them.

However, I'm still getting good performance out of some of the older rods -- they just need good new reels and respooling with new line.

The selection will at least be trimmed in half.  I could still keep at least one of the ultra-lights for small stream and panfish action, but many of the other rods in the top half can go as roadwarrior suggested.  Since most of my freshwater fishing will likely be from a boat on the local lakes and ponds, the 6'6" combos he's suggested will fit perfectly.

Again, I send my thanks.  I should be able to get started on the refitting soon (the new Cabela's combo will be my go-to tackle in the meantime as the weather permits).

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Zebco? Shakespere? Got to go.

I have some cheap rods, but I won't (I have some) use a zebco or shakespere. Sell them at a yard sale. Is you're a good saleman you might get $10 for them. Lol.

Stick with the quantums and st croix line.

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Thanks for the quick replies. Now that you've said it, I am thinking of narrowing down the selection quite a bit given how I'm not really using all of them. I've actually gone out and brought a light combo from Cabela's on sale today:

• Cabela's "Gold Label" GLS7022 - light/fast action spinning rod

w/ matching reel (6:1 ball bearings, fits lines 8# to 12 #)

The Gold Label combo seems like a decent start. The reel winds smoothly and has the continuous anti-reverse that I'm starting to appreciate in the newer, better models. Many of the older reels that I'm considering getting rid of lack that, which may have contributed to much of the slack and birds' nests that set in as much as the aged and worn mono on them.

However, I'm still getting good performance out of some of the older rods -- they just need good new reels and respooling with new line.

The selection will at least be trimmed in half. I could still keep at least one of the ultra-lights for small stream and panfish action, but many of the other rods in the top half can go as roadwarrior suggested. Since most of my freshwater fishing will likely be from a boat on the local lakes and ponds, the 6'6" combos he's suggested will fit perfectly.

Again, I send my thanks. I should be able to get started on the refitting soon (the new Cabela's combo will be my go-to tackle in the meantime as the weather permits).

Take it back.

You're in the same rut, more junk.

Get rid of all that crap you have at

a garage sale, give it away or throw

it away.

You're full grown. Step up and buy

three good rigs, one at a time. Heck,

just one might do it for you.

On sale at Cabela's:

Fenwick Techna AV AVS70MF or AVC70MF.

If you go with the spinning rod, get a

Symetre 2500. For baitcasting, the Citica.

8-)

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Thanks for the quick replies. Now that you've said it, I am thinking of narrowing down the selection quite a bit given how I'm not really using all of them. I've actually gone out and brought a light combo from Cabela's on sale today:

Cabela's "Gold Label" GLS7022 - light/fast action spinning rod

w/ matching reel (6:1 ball bearings, fits lines 8# to 12 #)

The Gold Label combo seems like a decent start. The reel winds smoothly and has the continuous anti-reverse that I'm starting to appreciate in the newer, better models. Many of the older reels that I'm considering getting rid of lack that, which may have contributed to much of the slack and birds' nests that set in as much as the aged and worn mono on them.

However, I'm still getting good performance out of some of the older rods -- they just need good new reels and respooling with new line.

The selection will at least be trimmed in half. I could still keep at least one of the ultra-lights for small stream and panfish action, but many of the other rods in the top half can go as roadwarrior suggested. Since most of my freshwater fishing will likely be from a boat on the local lakes and ponds, the 6'6" combos he's suggested will fit perfectly.

Again, I send my thanks. I should be able to get started on the refitting soon (the new Cabela's combo will be my go-to tackle in the meantime as the weather permits).

Take it back.

You're in the same rut, more junk.

Get rid of all that crap you have at

a garage sale, give it away or throw

it away.

You're full grown. Step up and buy

three good rigs, one at a time. Heck,

just one might do it for you.

On sale at Cabela's:

Fenwick Techna AV AVS70MF or AVC70MF.

If you go with the spinning rod, get a

Symetre 2500. For baitcasting, the Citica.

8-)

;D ;D ;D

I agree, take Roadwarriors advice and dump the junk. Ill even narrow it down for you if you want one insane rig, for very little money.

-Powell 683c casting rod matched with a Shimano Citica 200e. This is a very inexpensive rig that can do almost anything.

Powell -> http://www.***.com/descpageRDCPOWELL-PCR.html#

Shimano->http://www.***.com/descpageRLCSHIMANO-SCRE.html

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Carmen J Bernardo I think what RW and others are also trying to say is in the long run this will say you money. Quality products usually last longer and almost every big name brand in fishing has good warranty service. Also buying something like a main like Citica 200e from shimano means they will be serviced by Shimano for YEARS to come. They will also provide years of great service when properly cared for. Not to mention the fantastic performance you will get. So try to hold off on spur of the moment purchases and instead ask yourself "What do I fish most?". After that read up on what rod actions works best for that style of fishing. Then read up on rod models,brands, and lengths and actions they have. After that buy the best rod you can in your price range. I would also suggest checking out the flea market here. It's a great place for us members to sell/buy and trade out gear. Personally I sold a real on here that wasn't for me to a fan of those reals and I paired it up with some extra cash and bought a real I'm in love with from the flea market. It saved me a ton of cash and made three people very happy. So check it out and plan/research your purchases over the fall and winter.

P.S. It sure seems like we skipped fall this year and went right to winter!

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  Per Simp's advice, I should say that I'm primarily fishing freshwater lakes and streams with a little upper bay and river tidewater action thrown in whenever the opportunity presents itself.  While I'm aiming for bass, the crappie and panfish action isn't bad either.  This is really more a hobby than a profession for me, as I just like getting outside more than I used to and fishing seems more rewarding than sitting here cooped up in front of a computer all day.

  The bodies of water in the area within my reach (a short drive away from my house) includes primarily tidewater with a few large clearwater streams flowing out of the Piedmont hills to the north of me.  There are plenty of flatland reservoirs in Delaware with a few Piedmont reservoirs located in Pennsylvania and Maryland within a few hours' drive.  Structure on the lakes generally consists of blowdowns and a few points near expansive flats; the Piedmont lakes can add some rocky ledges and outcroppings to these.  The same would go for streams.

  As for getting the expensive rods and reels, I'd love to pay for a few but the finances now are extremely thin for me.  I'm not working in a job which allows me much in the way of disposable income right now and have a modest pile of debt that I'm going to be paying off within the next few months.  Also, I'm not so confident of selling rods (though it's possible that any poor "noob" would love a cheap rod in this economy).  Instead, I can always take the extra rods and reels (at least those which still seem to work) to the local Goodwill store -- just as acceptable a means of clearing out the clutter for me.

  Once that debt gets paid off, I might go and check out those models and combos you guys are suggesting.

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Per Simp's advice, I should say that I'm primarily fishing freshwater lakes and streams with a little upper bay and river tidewater action thrown in whenever the opportunity presents itself. While I'm aiming for bass, the crappie and panfish action isn't bad either. This is really more a hobby than a profession for me, as I just like getting outside more than I used to and fishing seems more rewarding than sitting here cooped up in front of a computer all day.

The bodies of water in the area within my reach (a short drive away from my house) includes primarily tidewater with a few large clearwater streams flowing out of the Piedmont hills to the north of me. There are plenty of flatland reservoirs in Delaware with a few Piedmont reservoirs located in Pennsylvania and Maryland within a few hours' drive. Structure on the lakes generally consists of blowdowns and a few points near expansive flats; the Piedmont lakes can add some rocky ledges and outcroppings to these. The same would go for streams.

As for getting the expensive rods and reels, I'd love to pay for a few but the finances now are extremely thin for me. I'm not working in a job which allows me much in the way of disposable income right now and have a modest pile of debt that I'm going to be paying off within the next few months. Also, I'm not so confident of selling rods (though it's possible that any poor "noob" would love a cheap rod in this economy). Instead, I can always take the extra rods and reels (at least those which still seem to work) to the local Goodwill store -- just as acceptable a means of clearing out the clutter for me.

Once that debt gets paid off, I might go and check out those models and combos you guys are suggesting.

It seems that what you have already suits what you need or plan to accomplish.  I see no need, based on what you've written to change any gear. General fishing, non-specific, is covered by your general purpose gear. Sorry to be a party pooper but that's just the bait monkey talking and look to fill a false need.

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Per your original question we seemed to have ignored ,sorry about that BTW.

[ch8226] Shakespeare SP 348-1UUL 4'8" ultra-ultra-light spinning =Panfish

[ch8226] Shimano RX2500 5'6" ultra-light spinning=Panfish

[ch8226] Berkeley H21 5'6" light spinning=Panfish

[ch8226] Zebco GBC562ML 5'6" medium-light casting "Gatorback"=Panfish

[ch8226] Zebco ZRC56M 5'6" medium casting "Rhino"=Panfish

[ch8226] Renegade RTS 602UL 6'0" ultra-light spinning=Panfish/ultra light bass gear to make small bass more fun.

[ch8226] Johnson JFS-1 6'0" medium-light spinning=same as above

[ch8226] Shakespeare SP2660-2M 6'0" medium spinning=same as above+jerkbaits possibly

[ch8226] Quantum QXLC 60M 6'0" medium casting-small cranks,top plugs like popers, jerkbaits, inline spiners

[ch8226] Shakespeare SP 860-1MH 6'0" medium-heavy spinning=crappie,trout, bass using tubes, grubs, senkos, small spinners,small cranks.

[ch8226] Berkeley 6'6" medium spinning "Lightning" = Crappie,Trout,Bass using senkos,small cranks,spinners, and if it's very sensitive compared to you other rods shacky head, tubes ect.

[ch8226] Browning 6'6" medium casting "David Fritts Special" = CRANKING, CRANKING, CRANKING. David Fritts is a master crabkbait fisherman and this rod is probably pretty decent. It should handle anything with trebble hooks well but cranks that dive deaper then 12ft would be pushing it with this rod.

[ch8226] St Croix GS66M2 6'6" medium spinning= same as the other spining rod with this action but this rod is probably your best spinning rod.

[ch8226] Quantum EC66M 6'6" medium casting=Again a good rod for anything with trebble hooks.

[ch8226] Quantum QCS66MH 6'6" medium-heavy casting= Buzz baits, spinnerbaits, Jig and Worm rod for under 1/2 oz.

[ch8226] Daiwa "Legacy" casting rod (model #s, size and power rating not

legible -- looks to be a 7-footer with a fairly fast tip)= Depends if it's a heavy rod with a fast tip it could be a good froging rod. Like the Spro frog or the Rage Toad. It might also be a good flipping stick. On the other hand if it's a light action 7ft rod it might be a good shacky head or tube rod.

Well that's my 2 cents I hope it helps.

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  I appreciate the clarification, Simp, although maybe I could've made things a little simpler myself by giving more details on what I usually aim for and which rods I need to keep.  As it is, your latest reply helped me narrow it down quite a bit.

  There are quite a few redundancies in my current selection, it seems.  I don't really need that many ultralights since the Renegade does its job well and will be complemented by the 7-footer I just brought for those days I choose to go panfishing out at the local ponds.

  The medium and heavier rods need more sorting out, though.  Between the David Fritts caster and the Quantum model, it's a choice of just which one feels better to me.  The others could have just enough nuances to make it possible to choose between specific presentations such as jigging in deep water or working a topwater across shallow flats.

  In time, should I be able to save up enough to go for a better quality rod and reel, I may even be able to narrow down the selection even more and find something even better for my style.  Nearly all of the remaining rods may get a replacement reel and new line still, though that may take me a few months to complete.

  Again, I appreciate you guys coming through.

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   Here's my final roundup on the rods that I've decided to keep after working through my collection.  For simplicity's sake, I excluded three lighter rods to be used for panfish/trout fishing and three heavier rods intended for inshore/bay fishing and ocean surf fishing.

  • [*] St Croix Pro Glass Linear (6' 6" M, moderate-fast action)

Intended as the go-to spinning rod for general freshwater fishing applications, but will be used for bass fishing in most area freshwater and even some tidal creeks

[*] Shakespeare Sigma Intrepid (6' 0" MH, moderate-fast action)

Intended more for jigging in deep water or heavier cover such as you'd find in Piedmont lakes or some of the larger streams where lots of rocks are present

[*] Quantum Energy (6' 6" M, moderate-fast action)

A baitcast rod comparable to my Browning, but of graphite composition which may be used for slightly different presentations depending on conditions

[*] Browning David Fritts Special (6' 6" M, fast action)

The go-to crankbaiting rod, as suggested by Simp, though its fiberglass composition makes it a bit softer

[*] Quantum Competition (6' 6" MH, moderate-fast action)

A stouter spinning rod which may be used for heavier cover where the other spinning rods might have trouble

[*] Daiwa Eliminator (7' 0" M, moderate action)

This could be my topwater rod but it's rated for heavier lure weights (3/8ths - 1 ounce), which suggests Carolina/Texas rigs in heavy cover -- I actually used it in the Delaware Bay, landing a bluefish hooked on a 2-oz bucktail.

   All in all, that's it for the potential bassing rods.  I'll be starting up a new threat as a sort of "return of the son of" this one, soliciting suggestions for reels to pair up with the rod collection.  Look for that one.

Thanks, all...

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