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Drunk Farmer Hay-Bales Himself

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I'm not registered with youtube, so I couldn't watch.

I suspect it is the one I've seen before where the baler supposedly spits out the farmer who jumped into the pickup of the baler along with the hay.

He exits running with his head, arms and legs protruding from the bale.

http://www.neatorama.com/2010/08/26/man-jumps-into-hay-baler/

I worked several summers on various farms baling hay. Believe me, there is no way he went through that machine.

It is funny, even though it is faked.

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Anybody dumb enough to try it doesn't belong in the gene pool.

I'm not familiar with that particular baler, but the ones I've worked with picked up the hay at the front and discharged the finished bale from the chute at the rear.

There is absolutely no way to enter the baler between those two points.  If you could jump in where he did in the video, it would spew hay out.  Depending on the tension of the discharge shoot, bales can be packed as tightly as garbage in the back of a garbage truck.

In a rectangular baler, the hay or straw is folded much like the bellows of an accordian.  Once the twine is cut, the bale can be pulled apart in flakes.

Were it possible, anyone passing through would be folded, spindled and mutilated before being discharged.

In any case, it's no worse than many of the stupid antics in the Jackass movies.

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Anybody dumb enough to try it doesn't belong in the gene pool.

I'm not familiar with that particular baler, but the ones I've worked with picked up the hay at the front and discharged the finished bale from the chute at the rear.

There is absolutely no way to enter the baler between those two points. If you could jump in where he did in the video, it would spew hay out. Depending on the tension of the discharge shoot, bales can be packed as tightly as garbage in the back of a garbage truck.

In a rectangular baler, the hay or straw is folded much like the bellows of an accordian. Once the twine is cut, the bale can be pulled apart in flakes.

Were it possible, anyone passing through would be folded, spindled and mutilated before being discharged.

In any case, it's no worse than many of the stupid antics in the Jackass movies.

Jackass 3D rocked  ;D

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This reminds me of the optometrist who got caught in his lens grinder and made a spectacle of himself!

Then there was the sick guppy who went to see the fishician, no operation was recommended but just for the halibut he went to see a famous sturgeon.

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When I saw it the first time I almost wet myself. I have zero knowledge of farm equipment, thanks for clarifying.

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When I saw it the first time I almost wet myself. I have zero knowledge of farm equipment, thanks for clarifying.

It's a very funny video, but as other's have said a complete fake.  I think it's even two different people because it would be difficult to get into that hay bale costume that quickly.

These rectangular balers pickup the hay/straw that was been raked into windrows.  It uses tines to "rake" the hay into the baler.  An auger moves the hay into the baling area.  They then compress the hay into the rectangular shape using a "knife" and a "plunger".  The cuts the hay before the plunger pushes it back and compresses it.  When you take apart a rectangular bale it comes apart in small sections typically a few inches wide.  Each section is represents one cycle of the knife and plunger. 

And for the person who said someone may try this, anyone who's ever been around a baler would instantly know that this video is faked.

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And for the person who said someone may try this, anyone who's ever been around a baler would instantly know that this video is faked.

Yep, all you have to do is peer into the chute, and you'll realize it wouldn't end well, LOL.  I saw this video a year ago, its still funny.

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My first experience with baling hay involved an antique machine that used baling wire, not twine.

If memory serves, it took two guys one on each side of the machine.  The first would push the wire through to the person on the other side, leaving the looped end sticking out.  Two wires, one near the top and the other near the bottom of the bale.  When enough hay had been packed into the chute.  The person on the other side would push the wires back through the bail and the first person would run the wire through the loop and make a couple of turns to lock it in place. 

When the bale popped out of the chute, it would expand to the limit against the baling wire.

There was a tube on the first side of the baler that held the baling wires which were 6 - 8 feet long.  It was a while ago, and I am recalling it through the fog of time, so my recollection may not be perfectly accurate.

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It was a while ago, and I am recalling it through the fog of time, so my recollection may not be perfectly accurate.

Were horses pulling it?

;)

:D

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It was a while ago, and I am recalling it through the fog of time, so my recollection may not be perfectly accurate.

Were horses pulling it?

;)

:D

What are you thinking? Horses? How ridiculous.

We used mastodons. ;D ;D

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It was a while ago, and I am recalling it through the fog of time, so my recollection may not be perfectly accurate.

Were horses pulling it?

;)

:D

Originally, it might have been pulled by horses, but when I was working on it, it was pulled by a Deere.  Oh yeah, and that old Deere did not have an electric starter.  You had to start it by hand.  The flywheel was on the side.  You'd rotate it until one of the two cylinders was under compression, then give it a sharp tug to rotate it.

Each cylinder had a petcock you opened to reduce the compression making it easier to spin.

It also had two fuel tanks, one for gasoline, and the other for kerosene.  It would be started on the gasoline, but once it reached working temperature, it would be switched to kerosene.

The farmer never used kerosene.  Both tanks were used for gasoline.

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