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Captain Cali

Age of Dixon Bass

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From the California Fish & Game article:

"When I caught her they aged her at 11 years," said Long. "When Jed caught her she was 13. A bass will peak weight-wise at 15 years old and live to be up to 25 years old. It is proof catch-and-release works."

Mike Long caught the fish in 2001 and Jed Dickerson in 2003. That would make the bass about 16 years old right now. Far from kicking the bucket. Just thought everyone might want to consider that. A lot of people seem to think this bass was on it's way out either way but if the original scale sample proved correct age estimates, this bass is in it's prime (size wise) as we speak.

Catch & Release baby!

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Where did he get his info from on how long bass survive.   I haven't heard other biologists that confirm 25 years.   13-15 yrs was average.

Now Cuba on the other hand, supposedly have bass that out live our strains found in the US.    

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I also read that and had no idea that Bass lived that long.  (if not kept)  ...lol  I wish there was a way to age them on the water, it would be neat to be able to age the larger ones we catch.

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Here's from one research site......

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Largemouth bass live much longer in the wild than they do in captivity. The longest known lifespan of a wild largemouth bass was 23 years. The expected lifespan in the wild, though, is around 15 years. In captivity the longest lifespan recorded was 11 years, while the average age of death in captivity is around 6 years. (Becker, 1983; Boschung, Mayden, and Tomelleri, 2004; Carlander, 1977; Hubbs, 1964)

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This seems to make the above statement very accurate.....

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Matt, I don't know where he got his info. All I know is what the article states. I think average and maximum are 2 different things though. Again, I'm no expert on this.

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I also read that and had no idea that Bass lived that long. (if not kept) ...lol I wish there was a way to age them on the water, it would be neat to be able to age the larger ones we catch.

There is. You cut them open and count the rings on there liver. LOL.....Just kidding. ;)

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The reality of bass living 25 years is not accurate according to biologists, I went back and read numerous articles from noted biologists, area does make a difference to as how long they survive.    Bass, on average are reported to live 13-15 years depending on the region.

We all know of a few people who live to the century mark, but its not the norm, and a few bass may have lived to 25 years, and its not the norm as per the biologists either.

If they did live that long, or a vast majority, the WR would have fallen long ago in my opinion.

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How do they know that this same bass was cought on three differnt occasions.  Is it possible that there is three or more differnt monster bass in the lake?

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How do they know that this same bass was cought on three differnt occasions.  Is it possible that there is three or more differnt monster bass in the lake?

Scale sample and DNA testing.

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Matt,

Where did it say that all bass can live up to 25 years??? He said they can live to 25 years, which according to my research, is accurate. The oldest on record is 23, so I am sure some have lived to 25.

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It takes a 20 year plus bass to reach record potential. Biologists say that the normal life expectancy is 13-15 years. That's one reason for Georgia maintaining the WR. And of course you will always have people screwing up and getting their bass disqualified. If I lived in an area that had WR potential, I'd would memorize the IGFA rules and have them posted on my boat. I'd have certified scales, video, and camera. Even with all of that, I'll find a tank big enough to hold that WR bass until the IGFA guys certify it themselves. It's all about the $$$$$$$$$$$$

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How do they know that this same bass was cought on three differnt occasions. Is it possible that there is three or more differnt monster bass in the lake?

I think I read somewhere that this particular bass has a distinct black spot under one of it's gills.

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