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Alright i have 2 different questions both belong in this section so i'll just put them together instead of starting two topics.

Question #1..What are the benefits to using a baitcaster over a spinning real when casting really light lures?

Question #2..During a recent discussion(more like an argument) with a friend, we were discussing components of a rod making it better. His argument was he has a IM7 team daiwa v rod rod with 10 fuji guides and a full cork grip that he bought for $59.99 was better that the 30 ton vendetta rod of mine since mine only has 8 guides and a split eva grip that i bought for $79.99. So basically he is saying he bought a better quality rod for a lesser price. I can see his point about more components = more mfg cost and better rod. I would think though the price difference would be in the construction or maybe the graphite material itself? So is there any validity to his argument?

Thanks!!

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Alright i have 2 different questions both belong in this section so i'll just put them together instead of starting two topics.

Question #1..What are the benefits to using a baitcaster over a spinning real when casting really light lures?

Question #2..During a recent discussion(more like an argument) with a friend, we were discussing components of a rod making it better. His argument was he has a IM7 team daiwa v rod rod with 10 fuji guides and a full cork grip that he bought for $59.99 was better that the 30 ton vendetta rod of mine since mine only has 8 guides and a split eva grip that i bought for $79.99. So basically he is saying he bought a better quality rod for a lesser price. I can see his point about more components = more mfg cost and better rod. I would think though the price difference would be in the construction or maybe the graphite material itself? So is there any validity to his argument?

Answer #1- I see no advantage to baitcasters over spinning reels for very light. "Very light lures and finesse techniques are the only reason I use spinning gear at all. That's just my opinion. FWIW

Answer # 2- As a custom rod builder, the idea that more guides and more cork makes a better rod is absurd. The reason I started building my own rods, was to eliminate the extra weight and increase sensitivity by reducing the amount of stuff attached to the rod. All my "custom" rods (I only have spinning rods that are store bought)have fewer guides than an "Ugly Stik" and split grips, by design. Most are built on high end G. Loomis and Lamiglas blanks, with high quality components. Most of these rods have a value of several hundred dollars. At least that's what I have in the parts. JMHO

Ronnie

Thanks!!

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#1- you can use finess techniques with both spinning and baitcasting as long as the setup is correct

#2- have both rods, both serve a purpose. In my opinion, I like the vendetta better!

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Baitcasting gear can be made to work for finnesse fishing up to a point, but there is no inherent advantage in using baitcasting for this. If anything the opposite is true.

Rod components vary in quality and price. A split grip made of premium cork can cost more that a full grip of lesser quality cork. Guides vary widely in cost also. A well designed rod will have the minimum number of guides to get the job done. More components doesn't equal value. There are no industry standards for blanks and modulus of the graphite by itself does not equate to a better or more sensitive rod.

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No advantage to baitcasting in a finesse situation. Only the opposite is true.

Given some wizz-bang big buck tuned Daiwa baitcaster that 'can' throw finesse lures, you still get a slack line fall with a spinning rod, that to me, is important.

Rod prices and opinions are so far out there these days that I'm just starting to ignore it all, and get what works for me.

Heck, I've got rods that cost me $200 or more that all sorts of people here think are junk, or no good. And to me, a rod that price is a very premium rod. I just can't and won't spend more than that.

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$200 is just below the point of diminishing returns on a production rod which is around $250-$275. Each price point has its bang for the buck entries but a lot of it comes down to preference

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