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Take Your Neko Rig To The Next Level

Take Your Neko Rig To The Next Level Fine tune this finesse lure and you’ll catch more bass, whether you’re fishing it shallow or deep. Learn how Bassmaster Elite Series angler Cliff Pirch makes his Neko rig the best that it can be.

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Bassmaster Elite Series angler Cliff Pirch said the Neko rig is a finesse presentation that he can fish in shallow or deep water. Photo courtesy of B.A.S.S / Seigo Saito.

Bassmaster Elite Series angler Cliff Pirch said the Neko rig is a finesse presentation that he can fish in shallow or deep water. Photo courtesy of B.A.S.S / Seigo Saito.

Wacky rigged soft-plastic lures are bass catching machines. Their slow fall and wiggles are irresistible to fish. But they require patience on the part of the angler. Without a weight, it takes time for them to reach the bottom or at least the depth where bass are suspended. Adding weight solves that problem. Wacky jig rigged worms, such as Jackall’s Flick Shake, preserve the action and bring a faster sink and better penetration of cover.

   Wacky rigged soft-plastic lures take on a different action when the weight is moved from the middle. Enter the Neko rig, whose hook is inserted mid-lure with the point exposed, as it is in wacky rigs, but the weight is inserted into one end.

   While Neko rigs also offer the same fall and action that make wacky rigs such great bass catchers, they bring something unique to the table. While one end of the soft-plastic lure floats off the bottom, the other is pinned to the bottom. That helps you create pinpoint presentations. Where current, wind blown slack line or waves take weightless wacky rigs random places, a Neko rig stays put.

   Payson, Ariz. Bassmaster Elite Series angler Cliff Pirch knows finesse fishing. He learned it fishing on the deep, clear and often pressured fisheries of the western U.S. The Neko rig is one of his favorite finesse presentations. Here’s how he rigs his to catch more bass.

 

Limit your lure choices

Pirch chooses from a small selection of soft-plastic lures when assembling his Neko rig. His most-used options are Big Bite finesse worms or stick worms. “I don’t get really tricky with it,” he said. Both have a natural profile and enough action to solicit strikes. He also keeps the colors simple, matching the conditions, such as a dark worm in dark water, or choosing one that historically has worked in the region where he’s fishing.

   But worms aren’t the only soft-plastic lures that you can fish on a Neko rig. A craw worm also would work, Pirch said, especially when irritating a bedded bass into striking.

   The key to any wacky rigged finesse presentation is using a soft-plastic lure that literally works for you. Even at rest, it must wiggle because the less you move a wacky rig, the more bass it catches.

 

Fish it on the correct rod

Pirch always picks a spinning outfit for fishing Neko rigs. The rod is 7-feet long and has a medium action, flexing about half way through the blank. That requires some effort to load, helping cast light rigs and hook soft bites.

   Match your rod to a quality spinning reel with a smooth drag and large-diameter spool. The drag will keep more bass hooked, especially when using smaller hooks, and line wraps around the spool in bigger coils, reducing the tangles that most often come when is tightly wound around smaller spools.

 

Strengthen it with two lines

Pirch loads his spinning reel with braided line, choosing as light a weight as cover permits. Its lack of stretch provides plenty of sensitivity, allowing him to feel the slightest bite. It also helps him work his Neko rig. “You don’t have a lot weight, so you want to be able to see the line move,” Pirch said. “If it moves 1 inch at the bait, it’s an inch at your rod tip.”

   Pirch doesn’t tie his braid directly to his Neko rig’s hook. Instead, he adds a 7-feet to 8-feet long fluorocarbon leader in between. That length gives him the opportunity to retie his hook several times without having to replace the entire leader. It also keeps his knot out of the spool, where it can be damaged and cut casting distance.

   There are two more reasons why you should use the braid-fluorocarbon combination. The first is sensitivity. Fluorocarbon’s miniscule amount of stretch is unnoticeable next to braid, especially when compared to springy monofilament. That keeps you tight to what’s happening with your Neko rig. Pirch said the second is that fluorocarbon sinks, unlike monofilament, dragging lightly weighted Neko rigs deeper and keeping them there.

A hook’s shape can determine how many bass it catches. Bassmaster Elite Series angler Cliff Pirch said long-shanked hooks, left, grab more bass because of the gap created by the distance between the line tie and point. Traditional wacky rig hooks, right, have shorter shanks, which help them slip through cover without snagging. Photo by Pete M. Anderson

A hook’s shape can determine how many bass it catches. Bassmaster Elite Series angler Cliff Pirch said long-shanked hooks, left, grab more bass because of the gap created by the distance between the line tie and point. Traditional wacky rig hooks, right, have shorter shanks, which help them slip through cover without snagging. Photo by Pete M. Anderson

   Pirch connects the two lines with a Crazy Alberto knot, which shines when connecting lines of different diameters. It starts with doubling over the thicker leader. Then the braid is run through the loop that’s created and wrapped 14 times — seven down and seven back — around both pieces of leader. Finally, the tag is run back through the loop in the same direction as the first time. He believes it’s faster and easier to tie than an FG knot and stronger than the double-uni knot, other popular means of connecting two lines.

 

Stick with the correct hook

Tackle shops carry plenty of wacky rigging hooks, Pirch said, because more bass anglers are fishing the presentation more often. But don’t get lost in the choices. You only need to keep a few things in mind when selecting the best Neko rig hook.

   It’s tough to beat a straight-shank hook any time you’re rigging soft-plastic lures. Pirch said its length improves your hook-up ratio because of the larger gap between the point and line tie. Roboworm’s ReBarb hook is one that he chooses when he wants a long-shank hook.

   When Pirch needs a compact hook because of thick cover, such as brush or aquatic vegetation, he ties on Hayabusa’s Special Wacky Wire Guard hook. As its name implies, this hook sports a fine-wire weed guard. Its shorter shank, like those associated with most hooks marketed for wacky rigging, reduces its gap, making it more weedless than a long-shank hook. The size of either style should be chosen based on the lure that you’re rigging. A thick 4-inch stick worm, for example, will need a larger hook than a slim 4-inch finesse worm.

 

Add just enough weight

The piece that makes Neko rigs work is the weight. They come in a variety of sizes and shapes. All have at least one portion that’s shaped like a nail sporting small barbs or ridges. It keeps the weight stuck in the plastic, though it never hurts to add a drop or two of superglue for added grip.

Weights for Neko rigs come in a variety of shapes, including some that incorporate a skirt. But they all share one trait: a nail-like section that’s inserted into the soft-plastic lure. Photo by Pete M. Anderson

Weights for Neko rigs come in a variety of shapes, including some that incorporate a skirt. But they all share one trait: a nail-like section that’s inserted into the soft-plastic lure. Photo by Pete M. Anderson

   Neko weights are made of lead or tungsten. Some have a ball on one end, and VMC, for example, makes one sporting a skirt. There’s even one that twists into your worm with a spring. Pirch looks beyond those, choosing a Big Bite nail weight between 1/32 and 1/8 ounce. “That usually covers the range [of depths],” he said.

   Even though it’s a finesse presentation, there are benefits to putting a relatively heavy weight in your Neko rig. “If I can get away with a heavier [weight], it is going to save me time,” Pirch said. “But if you feel like you have to go light, it just takes more time [to sink]. But if that’s what it takes to get bit, then you have to do it.”

   You’ll want to protect your weight investment. While simply impaling your hook through the soft-plastic lure will create a Neko rig, it won’t be durable. Within a finite number of casts, especially if you catch a bass or two among them, your lure will rip, parting ways with your hook during a cast or bass jump, and taking your weight with it. Reduce that chance by using a small rubber o-ring. Often sold with a small tool for working them onto your soft-plastic lure, place it where you will insert your hook. And instead of putting your hook through the plastic, hook it under the stronger o-ring.

 

Pick your places

Where you fish is as important as what you are fishing. And in the case of the Neko, there are many places where it’ll catch a bass — largemouth, spotted or smallmouth. “It’s a real versatile bait as far as depth range,” Pirch said. “I see applications in multiple seasons — early ledge fishing, late winter deep spotted bass, spring spawning in shallows, deep suspended bait in the fall. There really are many times where it can be a tool that is applicable.”

   Anytime bass are around shallow cover and structure but conditions or fishing pressure are making them tentative, a Neko rig plays. Pirch proved that at Texas’ busy Lake Travis, where he used a Neko rig, in part, to post a 12th-place finish, sight fishing bass on spawning beds. And if shallow cover is thick, try using a weedless Neko rig variation — the Chicken rig. Its long-shank hook is Texas rigged with the line tie pointed away from the weight.

   But don’t limit yourself to skinny water. “I can fish deep spotted bass with [a Neko rig], 40- to 50-feet deep,” Pirch said. “They like the shape. They like the natural fall, and it’s a light-line technique where you can get it down there.”

   Pirch said a couple adjustments are required to fish deep water. The first is spending more time watching your electronics, whether bass are suspended or locked on the bottom. They’ll help you find them and keep your rig where they can bite it.

   You’ll need to add weight to your Neko rig, too. It’ll make your fishing more efficient, because you’ll spend less time waiting for your offering to reach the bass. And it’ll be easier to keep it there, especially when the wind is blowing and waves are rolling.

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