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Tame Your Tackle

Tame Your Tackle A ton of tackle is worthless if you can’t find the lure you need. Bassmaster Elite Series angler Dave Lefebre shares how he handles his, from storage to streamlining, to catch more bass.

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While you might not have as much tackle as Bassmaster Elite Series angler Dave Lefebre, you’ll benefit from organizing what you have as he does. And that starts with taking only what you’ll fish each trip. Photo courtesy of Dave Lefebre

While you might not have as much tackle as Bassmaster Elite Series angler Dave Lefebre, you’ll benefit from organizing what you have as he does. And that starts with taking only what you’ll fish each trip. Photo courtesy of Dave Lefebre

All bass anglers can relate to this scenario. You’re on a hot bite, landing a couple big bass in only a few casts. Then you break off the lure or shred the soft-plastic bait that was working so well. You dive into a boat compartment or tackle bag for another one. It’s not in this tackle box or that one. You open a third, but that’s filled with lures you probably won’t use this day. You search yet another. Seconds become minutes. You know you have one. Then you find it, stuck in a box with a different type of lure. But by now, your boat has drifted from the spot, or the bass have stopped biting.

   You can’t catch bass if your lure isn’t in the water, and searching for tackle is one of the best ways to keep that from happening. Time is money, as they say, and that’s even truer for professional anglers. Erie, Pa.-based pro Dave Lefebre knows a little something about that. For 13 years he was an FLW Tour pro, amassing more than $1.8 million in earnings. This year he’ll fish the Bassmaster Elite Series. Preparation is a big part of being successful on either trail. Before he heads to his first Elite Series event, which is on Florida’s St. John’s River, he’ll spend two weeks — all day each day, like he was punching the clock at a regular job — organizing and packing his tackle.

   Lefebre has fished full time since 2003. “The longer you do this, the more [tackle] you compile, and it can get out of control,” he said. He has refined a process for managing and organizing his mountain of tackle. While you might never acquire as much as him, you can learn from his system because the easier it’s for you to find a lure, the more bass you’ll catch.

Bring only what you need

Lefebre’s 2016 tournament season will take him to unfamiliar territory. While he’s fished many, if not all, the waters, he’ll have to adjust his fishing style. One of the biggest changes will be not having a co-angler fishing from the back deck of his boat. The FLW Tour recently reduced co-angler participation from three to two days at each event. They haven’t fished in the Elite Series since the 2008 season.

   FLW Tour pros have to consider their co-anglers. They need to make storage available and run the boat in way that doesn’t stifle their fishing opportunities. Lefebre said pros also have to pay attention to how co-anglers are catching bass. If he or she started catching on a shakey head, for example, he’d pick one up, too, to ensure he caught his share from the spot. Without a co-angler, he can stick to throwing big-bass lures, regardless of how slow the bite, and leave the shakey heads at home.

   “It’s all about funneling down the choices and gear to exactly what you do,” Lefebre said. “That makes for better decisions. Just like you wouldn’t need topwaters in January, unless you are fishing warm-water discharges for schoolies or in Florida, you don’t need to pack that stuff. “The more you have in the boat, the more you have in the back of your head,” he said.

   Simply put, access to too much tackle can be a distraction.

   You know the lures that you fish each season. In early spring, for example, you’ll want your jigs, crankbaits, spinnerbaits and jerkbaits. But you most likely won’t be throwing an umbrella rig, hollow-bodied frogs or 10-inch plastic worms. Those decisions also can be based on the species of bass you’re chasing and type of water you’ll fish. By using a modular system of utility boxes, such as Plano 3600s or 3700s, you can pull those holding the lures you’ll need for each trip and leave the rest home.

   If you are fishing several days in a row, you can whittle tackle as you go. Lefebre has eliminated much of the tackle he starts practice with by the time the tournament starts. What isn’t working goes into his truck. What is working may take up just a couple utility boxes.

   Take the 2015 FLW Tour stop at Alabama’s Lewis Smith Lake. “I had literally one box filled with Fish Head Spins with soft trailers,” he said. The night before, he would glue them together, so he had about 10 ready to go. Those, along with a Rapala wake bait, caught most of the 65 pounds and 5 ounces that he landed for the win.

Know what you have

Erie, Pa.-based Bassmaster Elite Series angler Dave Lefebre made tackle organization a priority when he built his house. While you might not have that opportunity, you can follow the same principle: Know where to find the lure you need. Photo courtesy of Dave Lefebre

Erie, Pa.-based Bassmaster Elite Series angler Dave Lefebre made tackle organization a priority when he built his house. While you might not have that opportunity, you can follow the same principle: Know where to find the lure you need. Photo courtesy of Dave Lefebre

Lefebre likened organizing tackle to storing digital photos. As time goes on, you take more and in turn have to find ways to store them, whether it’s on CDs, the cloud or thumb drives. You have to keep the old tackle — some of the lures he uses are decades old — and experiment with new ones. “You’re stupid not to try [them],” he said. And then you have to find each, along with the tackle you use day in and out, when you need it.

   Lefebre designed his new home around its garage, where he stores his tackle, boat and other fishing gear. When he pulls in his boat, boxes and bins of tackle are stacked to the right while more hangs on pegboard to the left. After he returns from a tournament, he removes all the tackle from his boat and truck and returns it to its designated spots in the garage. Then he starts over, pulling what he’ll need for the next one.

   Whether you store your tackle in a garage, basement, spare room or shed, it needs to be organized in a similar way as the tackle that’s going with you. Put all your hard baits in the same size boxes. That way you’ll know they’ll fit in your tackle bag or boat compartment. Label them in a way that you can read their contents when they are stored. Keep bags of like soft plastics together, so you’re less likely to return from a mad dash to the tackle shop for green-pumpkin jig trailers only to find you already have several bags.

   Lefebre rarely places a tackle order during the season. He’ll pick up locally hot lures while at a particular lake, but the tried-and-true lures are “in stock” when he starts his season. Deciding which need to be purchased is easy when every peg is supposed to hold a half dozen. “If I have five, I know I need to order some,” he said.

Everything in its place

Minimal effort can save time. Write the sizes of weights and jig heads on the lid of their assigned tackle boxes, for example, so you are not wasting time fumbling with bags to read the labels. Photo by Rich Perrott

Minimal effort can save time. Write the sizes of weights and jig heads on the lid of their assigned tackle boxes, for example, so you are not wasting time fumbling with bags to read the labels. Photo by Rich Perrott

At home, Lefebre stores his hard baits in boxes and bins. Each one is labeled with its contents. If he’s on the road and needs more of the exact crankbait that the bass want, he simply calls home. His wife can go to the garage, easily find the bin and then overnight ship the lures to him.

   Soft plastics are kept in wheeled totes made by Plano. Four-inch worms, 6-inch worms, grubs, craws, lizards and so on each have their own tote. If Lefebre knows one style will be the ticket at a tournament — such as 4-inch worms at Beaver Lake — he rolls the whole tote into his truck. Otherwise, he’ll pull the bags he wants and place them in deep Plano boxes without dividers.

   There’s one more option for storing soft plastics — re-sealable plastic bags. They come in a variety of sizes. If the worms you bought didn’t come in one, drop them into a sandwich-sized bag. Organize smaller bags by lure type in larger clear bags, so you can quickly see the contents. Swap the bags out as the season’s change, so you’re only carrying what you need.

   Lefebre stores the hard baits he wants for a tournament in Plano boxes. Take the time to not only organize by the box but also within each. Take crankbaits, for example. At the least, you’ll need a box for shallow ones and a second for deep ones. But as you acquire more tackle and learn more techniques, you may reorganize, adding boxes for lipless, square bill, wake and flat-sided crankbaits. Within each box, it’s easiest to organize by color, though size can be used, too.

Keep the most-used stuff handy

Quick access to the lures you plan to use the most during the day is important, whether you’re fishing for money, pride or fun. You want to take advantage of a hot bite, not squander it by spending your time looking for a fresh plastic worm or a replacement for the crankbait you just snagged and lost on a stump.

   Lefebre runs a Ranger Z520C. He puts six Plano boxes of hard baits in the small compartment in front of the driver’s console. His rods go in the passenger side box, and the middle one holds soft plastics. It also is where you’ll find five or six plastic bins, the kind you find at a dollar store. He puts lures in them for extra quick access.

   If you’re walking the bank or riding in someone else’s boat, put a bag or two of the soft plastics and a small box filled with weights, hooks and the hard baits you expect to use in one of the outside pockets of your tackle bag. You can still pack backups and alternatives in the main compartment, but you won’t have to wade through them to find what you’ll most likely need. If it’s your boat, dedicate a small corner — or an entire small compartment if available — to what you plan to use that day.

   Lefebre puts his terminal tackle — weights beads, snaps, pegs, super glue, hook sharpener, etc. — in a watertight Plano box. “That box goes everywhere I go,” he said. Its dividers are molded in place, so they can’t slide up and allow small pieces to mix. He pulls his hooks from their package and stores them in a Plano box. Spares are kept at home in a big tote, where individual packages of the same size and style are twist-tied together.

Ready your tackle

You can quickly grab the tackle box that stores the lure you need. That is great but not if it still has an old knot on the line tie or a broken treble hook. Remedying small issues while on the water can be frustrating and rob you of fishing time. Your lures should be ready to go when you are. The key, Lefebre said, is staying on top of it.

   Make tackle maintenance a regular chore. Return lures, once they are dry, to the correct box. Replace and sharpen their hooks and clean the line tie, which includes removing paint from new jig heads. Lefebre goes a step further. He uses the small packets of silicone gel that are added to packaging for electronic items such as TVs and laptops. They’re there to absorb any moisture that could harm the device. They also can be used to keep hooks from rusting. He puts one in each section of his hard-bait boxes, and his hook box gets four, one in each corner. “Everyone in my family saves them for me,” he said.

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