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Catch More Bass When the Mayflies Hatch

Catch More Bass When the Mayflies Hatch The U.S. and Canada are home to almost one-third of the world’s 2,500 species of mayflies, which hatch with summer’s warming waters. FLW Tour angler Shane Lineberger explains where to look for them and how to catch the bass that are swimming nearby.

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FLW Tour angler Shane Lineberger is always on the lookout for mayfly hatches, which happen for about a month starting in early June on the waters in his home state of North Carolina. Photo courtesy of FLW Outdoors / Andy Hagedon

FLW Tour angler Shane Lineberger is always on the lookout for mayfly hatches, which happen for about a month starting in early June on the waters in his home state of North Carolina. Photo courtesy of FLW Outdoors / Andy Hagedon

This particular stretch of shoreline didn’t appear much different than others along the South Carolina reservoir’s main tributary. Its bottom was sandy. The depth was shallow. Tree branches stretched over the water’s surface, casting some shade but still high enough to allow a lure to be skipped underneath. That last characteristic was important because there were plenty of bass holding under them.

   Why those bass chose this spot wasn’t evident at first. It was the middle of June, and it could have been a stopover as they swam to the main river from spawning spots in a nearby backwater. But it wasn’t until my lure bumped one of the branches during an errant cast that the attraction become apparent. The collision caused winged insects to fall from the branch to the water’s surface. There they were devoured by fish, which left only a small swirl where each bug had been.

   The insects were mayflies, whose regional names include fishflies, sandflies and drakes. Long honored as important hatches by trout anglers, the arrival of the winged versions of mayflies brings great bass fishing, too. “They’re the first link of the food chain,” said FLW Tour angler Shane Lineberger, who always keeps an eye open for hatches while on the water. While bass will eat mayflies, they are a favorite food of bluegill, bream, white perch, and other small fish. “And big fish eat little fish,” he said.

 

Meet the mayfly

There are about 700 species of mayflies in the U.S. and Canada. While some bass feed on the insect during its larval stage, their emergence in late spring creates a feeding frenzy.

There are about 700 species of mayflies in the U.S. and Canada. While some bass feed on the insect during its larval stage, their emergence in late spring creates a feeding frenzy.

There are about 700 species of mayflies in the U.S. and Canada, most recognizable by their large upward pointing wings, curved bodies, and thread-like tails. Water plays an important role in their lifecycle, so they are found in most streams, rivers, and lakes. They are sensitive to pollution, so their presence is an indicator of good water quality.

   Despite their name, very few mayflies hatch during the month of May. Instead, the first hatches are in very late spring — early June — and continue through fall. That’s because they are triggered by water temperature, happening once it’s warm enough. Once they hatch, female mayflies mate and deposit thousands of eggs on the water’s surface. They sink to the bottom, where they hatch in about 90 days.

   The larval, or nymph, stage can last up to three years, depending on species. During that time, they crawl along the bottom, hiding, eating, and waiting until its time to become an adult. Some emerge on the bottom, some crawl onto a dry surface, such as a shoreline rock or dock, and others emerge while floating on the water’s surface. Once they emerge, they take flight for anywhere from a few hours to a few days, mating and starting the cycle again, before dying.

   While some larval mayflies are eaten by fish, including bass, most are devoured during those precious moments when they emerge from the water.

 

When and where you’ll find them

Lineberger’s name is well-known in local and regional tournament circles around his home near Charlotte, N.C. He’s found fishing success on the national stage, climbing through the B.A.S.S. Opens to qualify for the Bassmaster Elite Series and now on the FLW Tour. While compiling that experience, he’s developed strategies for catching bass during seasonal happenings, including mayfly hatches.

   Lineberger expects to see Carolina mayflies begin hatching when summerlike weather arrives, usually about midway through June, and continue through the first part of July. It can be an important post-spawn pattern, especially when targeting largemouth bass. “It’s all about finding out where it’s happening,” he said. “All it takes is a couple. You’re not going to see a couple hatching. There will be a wad of them.”

When it comes to choosing a lure for bass fishing during a mayfly hatch, FLW Tour angler Shane Lineberger keeps it simple. He ties on a black topwater, usually a popper, walking bait or buzzbait. He said the color and styles best imitate a “blob” of the bugs struggling on the surface. Photo courtesy of FLW Outdoors / Andy Hagedon

When it comes to choosing a lure for bass fishing during a mayfly hatch, FLW Tour angler Shane Lineberger keeps it simple. He ties on a black topwater, usually a popper, walking bait or buzzbait. He said the color and styles best imitate a “blob” of the bugs struggling on the surface. Photo courtesy of FLW Outdoors / Andy Hagedon

   Discovering a hatch only requires observation. Lineberger suggests keeping your eyes open in the morning, when you launch your boat. You may see a few flying around while you’re walking from your truck to the dock. Look for newly hatched mayflies sitting on your boat or stuck in the cobwebs that form around dock posts. You may see their casings, left behind on the water’s surface when they took flight, washed up on the ramp or along the shore.

   On Southern reservoirs, Lineberger finds most mayfly hatches in tributaries, especially the main river. He said they’re nearly always along banks where there’s a soft bottom of mud, silt or sand. But not all of those are equally attractive to the insects. The addition of overhanging trees or docks give adult mayflies a place to land after emerging and cover for fish to hold while feeding on them.

   If you find mayflies clinging to overhanging trees but not much bass action below, there is a way to jumpstart the fishing. Lob a cast into the overhanging limbs, shaking your rod until your lure grabs one. Then while keeping a taunt line, start moving your rod back and forth, like you’re setting the hook in slow motion. That will shake the tree, causing some of the mayflies that are clinging to it to drop into the water and start fish feeding. Avoid racing in to retrieve your stuck lure because it could spook the feeding fish. Instead, use a second rod.

   It’s a slightly different situation in Northern waters, Lineberger said. Mayfly hatches there happen later in the summer, when the water finally warms to the point when they’ll hatch. But that’s not the only difference.

   At the 2017 B.A.S.S. Northern Open on Oneida Lake near Syracuse, N.Y., Lineberger saw smallmouth feeding in open water. They were acting like porpoises, racing to the surface to grab something before returning to the depths. Turns out they were feeding on emerging mayflies.

 

What to throw

When Lineberger fishes for bass feeding on and around mayflies, he matches the hatch — sort of. He definitely fishes where bass intersect them most — the surface. “The good thing [about a mayfly hatch] is it allows you to throw topwaters all day long,” he said.

   Lineberger usually chooses from three topwater lures — a popper, walking bait, and buzzbait. They each have a place, and he gives them equal fishing time. He always chooses the same color — black. He believes that helps them match a wriggling mass of mayflies floating on the surface. He feels bass key more on color than any other characteristic when they are feeding in clear water.

   While all three styles of topwaters are available in black, Lineberger cuts to the chase by purchasing a can of flat black spray paint and makes his own. Take the Rebel Pop-Rs he fished at the Oneida Lake B.A.S.S. Open. He painted them, including their trademark bucktail covered rear treble.

   Lineberger fishes his topwaters on the same setup. It starts with a 7-foot medium heavy Enigma rod and continues with a BPS Johnny Morris Titanium baitcasting reel and 15-pound test P-Line PF Original in smoke blue. It’s a copolymer line, so it floats. While fluorocarbon line’s minimal stretch and extra sensitivity can be benefits, that’s not the case here. Fluorocarbon line sinks, making fishing on the surface impossible.

   While fishing topwaters all day is a blast, it’s not the only way to catch bass drawn to a mayfly hatch. That’s because they aren’t all there to eat the insects. Many feed on the smaller fish that are eating the bugs. Try a jig — 3/8 ounce with a large trailer so it’s easy to swim — spinnerbait or fat-bodied crankbait, especially square bills.

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