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MaineBassFishin

Need Beginner Flyrod Combo Advice

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Looking to pickup a flyrod combo for mostly brook trout, brown trout and small salmon. I plan on buying a 9' 5 Weight rod, but don't want to spend too much. My budget is probably around $150 at most. Anyone have any combos I should look into?

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Do you have a local fly shop around you?  if so I would go in there as they would probably have a beginner combo for you to purchase.  My first combo was a cortland combo that did well for a while until i upgraded.  I am pretty sure reddington makes a decent beginner combo as well.  TFO makes some well reviewed combos too but i haven't cast them so can't speak from experience.

 

I think this year the bass pro reel and rod trade in works for fly rods too so might be worth checking out if you have one close by.

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I just picked up a 7'6" 4wt reddington crosswater combo for the small trout creek by my house. I picked it up at Gander Mtn for 120, and got a $25 gift card via rebate. I only have a little experience with it, but I do really like it, especially for the price. They come spooled up with backing, WF fly line, and leader, so it's ready to tie on a fly and get casting. Oh it comes with a hard rod tube carrier thing as well. I really like mine so far but I am new to fly fishing as well. Whatever you choose, I would ask someone more experienced before pulling the trigger on anything.

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Do you have a local fly shop around you? if so I would go in there as they would probably have a beginner combo for you to purchase. My first combo was a cortland combo that did well for a while until i upgraded. I am pretty sure reddington makes a decent beginner combo as well. TFO makes some well reviewed combos too but i haven't cast them so can't speak from experience.

I think this year the bass pro reel and rod trade in works for fly rods too so might be worth checking out if you have one close by.

Thanks for the advice I'll look into those.

Don't really have any local shops that are close by, except for cabelas which has a good size fly department. Since cabelas is the only real option for locally, I'll probably stick to buying offline if possible.

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Looking to pickup a flyrod combo for mostly brook trout, brown trout and small salmon. I plan on buying a 9' 5 Weight rod, but don't want to spend too much. My budget is probably around $150 at most. Anyone have any combos I should look into?

 

The best advice was given to go to a local fly shop if you can. They will have combos for beginners around that you will be able to cast (and yes they will give you free quick lessons while doing so). Temple Fork Outfitters makes some quality rods. I still have a few of the "Lefty Kreh" series and fish them as much as my Loomis & Winstons. Their "Professional Series" are excellent rods for beginners and priced around $100-$115 i think. The Reddington Crosswater stated above is a good one for beginners as well. Orvis makes an economy line that gets positive reviews, I think they are called Clearwater series.

 

A 5 weight would be the best size to get if you are targeting Brooks & Browns, however I would not chase salmon with one. Even a small salmon is strong enough to snap a 5wt. I would go no lower than 8wt for salmon. I was hooking into average size Sockeye this summer with my 8wt and felt undergunned on occasion.

 

A good general rule when buying a combo is to spend 70% on the rod, 20% on the line, and 10% on the reel. Get the best rod you can afford as it make the most difference. Get a decent line because it does make a difference. Unless you are targeting salt water fish, trophy size fish, or large fish on light tippett, the reel is just holding line.

 

Good luck!

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The best advice was given to go to a local fly shop if you can. They will have combos for beginners around that you will be able to cast (and yes they will give you free quick lessons while doing so). Temple Fork Outfitters makes some quality rods. I still have a few of the "Lefty Kreh" series and fish them as much as my Loomis & Winstons. Their "Professional Series" are excellent rods for beginners and priced around $100-$115 i think. The Reddington Crosswater stated above is a good one for beginners as well. Orvis makes an economy line that gets positive reviews, I think they are called Clearwater series.

A 5 weight would be the best size to get if you are targeting Brooks & Browns, however I would not chase salmon with one. Even a small salmon is strong enough to snap a 5wt. I would go no lower than 8wt for salmon. I was hooking into average size Sockeye this summer with my 8wt and felt undergunned on occasion.

A good general rule when buying a c

ombo is to spend 70% on the rod, 20% on the line, and 10% on the reel. Get the best rod you can afford as it make the most difference. Get a decent line because it does make a difference. Unless you are targeting salt water fish, trophy size fish, or large fish on light tippett, the reel is just holding line.

Good luck!

Thanks for the advice, wouldn't really be targeting salmon much, but can be caught in the places I woul be fishing. Usually they average 10-14inches so their not huge.

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If you have a Cabelas nearby, or you could or one online, they have the RLS combo on sale for $160 from $320. I would buy this. They also have a WInd River combo for $90 from 120. I got that recently and it seems very good for beginners. I will eventually get the RLS combo maybe next year. I was just buying other stuff and didnt want to spend the extra money. 

Other things you need:

Forceps, fly storage, a vest is nice to have, tippet and leader material, fly floatant, and a net.

If you can get that as a start then you will be fine. 

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Also, what other things do you guys reccomend I purchase along with the combo, other than waders?

Well you will need flies for your area, tippet for when you break off flies, a pair of nippers to cut the leader material and probably some fly floatant if you are fishing dries.  Polarized sunglasses are one of the most important items too but i figure you already have those.  Depending on how much stuff you get you will need a way to carry it all too.  I prefer the chest packs myself, others prefer vests and some prefer fanny packs.  You won't have that much stuff initially so you can probably get away with just using the pocket on your waders but make sure your keys are fastened to something and not just loose because otherwise you may end up dropping them when you are getting out other stuff.

 

I would also still go to cables because the local info will be much better than buying online.  They should know what flies to get, what weight leaders etc... 

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If you have a Cabelas nearby, or you could or one online, they have the RLS combo on sale for $160 from $320. I would buy this. They also have a WInd River combo for $90 from 120. I got that recently and it seems very good for beginners. I will eventually get the RLS combo maybe next year. I was just buying other stuff and didnt want to spend the extra money. 

Other things you need:

Forceps, fly storage, a vest is nice to have, tippet and leader material, fly floatant, and a net.

If you can get that as a start then you will be fine. 

 

 

Well you will need flies for your area, tippet for when you break off flies, a pair of nippers to cut the leader material and probably some fly floatant if you are fishing dries.  Polarized sunglasses are one of the most important items too but i figure you already have those.  Depending on how much stuff you get you will need a way to carry it all too.  I prefer the chest packs myself, others prefer vests and some prefer fanny packs.  You won't have that much stuff initially so you can probably get away with just using the pocket on your waders but make sure your keys are fastened to something and not just loose because otherwise you may end up dropping them when you are getting out other stuff.

 

I would also still go to cables because the local info will be much better than buying online.  They should know what flies to get, what weight leaders etc... 

Thank you guys!

 

Do you think its worth considering upping to say a 6 weight?

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Personally I say no. I have caught plenty of 20"+ browns on my 4wt. 5 or a 6wt is overkill for brookies in my opinion. Lighter weight rods are easier to learn to cast on too

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Personally I say no. I have caught plenty of 20"+ browns on my 4wt. 5 or a 6wt is overkill for brookies in my opinion. Lighter weight rods are easier to leave to cast on too

Will a 5 weight be able to handle bass, only curious as I may be moving to Florida in the next year, so I want something thats relatively all purpose.

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Will a 5 weight be able to handle bass, only curious as I may be moving to Florida in the next year, so I want something thats relatively all purpose.

 

Not really.  You typically use bigger flies with bigger hooks and you need heavier line so that translates to a heavier rod.  8wt is what I would be using as a bass setup in FL.  That said, I would stick to a 5wt to learn on and not spend a fortune on it.  Then if it is something you enjoy, you will probably want at least one more rod sooner than you think and you can pick up the 8wt then.   The rod weight is no different than a regular bass rod, you want a heavier stick to drive the hook home on big flies just the same as you would with a big jig or other large single hook bait.  Also you need to take the same consideration for cover that you will be fishing, in heavy cover you want a heavy stick to turn the fish and keep it from wrapping itself up.  

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I will add to that, you can certainly catch bass on a 5wt and it is not going to snap your rod but your going to miss a lot of fish which will be frustrating when your learning.

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Will a 5 weight be able to handle bass, only curious as I may be moving to Florida in the next year, so I want something thats relatively all purpose.

I got a 5 wt. I will use it for bass because where i'm going to use it the bass won't be bigger than 4 or 5 pounds. In Florida though you might want a heavier one. For now with trout i'd get a 5wt. Its your best bet for trout and it can handle bass. But as mentioned above, the flies are usually bigger but the bass flies I am just about to order will be fine with my 5wt. 

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The weight of a fly rod is more about handling the flies than the fish in a freshwater application.  I have landed 20lb carp on a 4wt before it just takes some time.  For largemouth it is going to be more about the cover you fish and flies you chuck rather than handling the fish itself.  There is a lot of shock built into a fly rod set up so as long as you can get the hook home there is a good chance you will land the fish. especially in lighter cover.

 

I like to chuck big flies for largemouth so i use a Sage Bass II Largemouth rod which roughly is the equivalent of almost a 9-10 wt rod.  I have pulled some big fish out of heavy cover with it and can throw a wet sock if i want to :)  Also for bass i wouldn't even bother with a tapered leader, i go straight flouro in 8-12lb weights depending on the situation.  For brookies that is about the only time i use a tapered leader these days, even when chasing browns i use a straight leader as I treat them more like a smallmouth as they are big time meat eaters.

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Personally I say no. I have caught plenty of 20"+ browns on my 4wt. 5 or a 6wt is overkill for brookies in my opinion. Lighter weight rods are easier to leave to cast on too

 

 

Took me a minute to figure out you meant "learn to cast on".  I'm a bit slow sometimes.  I learned on an 8wt GL3.  About 4 years ago I picked up a homebuilt 3wt for panfish.  Made the mistake of getting a double taper line.  3wt action is very sloooooow.  Light line is very hard to cast.   I couldn't cast it as far as I could spit....and I can't spit for sh$t.  :teeth:

 

Haven't used it since.  Admittedly I had just got back into fishing the year before, and had also switched from spinning to baitcast reels which is where all my focus has been.  I did try to find a certified instructor, but the only one I could find anywhere close by never returned my email.

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The weight of a fly rod has nothing to do with the speed of the rod.  They make slow to XF actions in all weights.  A lot of people prefer a slower action rod in the lighter weights because they protect lighter line tippets more and are the conventional equivalent of ultralight in my mind.

 

I am not a fan of DT lines except in small streams as they tend to roll cast better in my opinion.  I have a DT on my mountain stream 3 wt.  My guess would be that learning to cast on that 8wt and then trying to transition to a lighter weight and a slow rod you weren't allowing the rod to load properly.  Slower rods need you to slow down your casting stroke and allow the rod to do the work.  Also a homebuilt rod could have other issues too lol.

 

I used to always tell the people i was teaching to cast that if they were sore at the end of the day they were either way out of shape or they are not letting the rod do the work.  I have a serious tendency myself to want to muscle the heavier flies out there but it doesn't really help anything. The one nice thing is you can practice fly casting pretty much anywhere because you don't really need a fly on the end to get your casting down.

 

And yeah, i meant to say learn but obviously my Mac decide my typo was closer to leave than learn :) 

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The weight of a fly rod has nothing to do with the speed of the rod.  They make slow to XF actions in all weights.  A lot of people prefer a slower action rod in the lighter weights because they protect lighter line tippets more and are the conventional equivalent of ultralight in my mind.

 

I am not a fan of DT lines except in small streams as they tend to roll cast better in my opinion.  I have a DT on my mountain stream 3 wt.  My guess would be that learning to cast on that 8wt and then trying to transition to a lighter weight and a slow rod you weren't allowing the rod to load properly.  Slower rods need you to slow down your casting stroke and allow the rod to do the work.  Also a homebuilt rod could have other issues too lol.

 

I used to always tell the people i was teaching to cast that if they were sore at the end of the day they were either way out of shape or they are not letting the rod do the work.  I have a serious tendency myself to want to muscle the heavier flies out there but it doesn't really help anything. The one nice thing is you can practice fly casting pretty much anywhere because you don't really need a fly on the end to get your casting down.

 

And yeah, i meant to say learn but obviously my Mac decide my typo was closer to leave than learn :)

 

Yeah, I know the rod weight has nothing to do with the rod's action.  That is why some people prefer certain lines of rods as they are use to casting a rod with that action...be it slow, fast or somewhere in between.  No doubt my timing was way off.  I knew not to try to overpower the rod.  The lake I was at usually has some kind of wind.  This day wasn't bad so I took the rod out for a spin.

 

The rod was purchased from a guy on the Texas Fishing Forum.  Other people have said his rods are very good, so when the 3 wt. came up for sale at what I felt was a good price I jumped on it.  I'm still buying baitcasting rods and reels, but I would like to get both my fly rods out.  I enjoy casting with one.  First I will be investing in a 3wt WF line, tho.  :smile2:

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If you want to have a lot of fun get a 3wt straight line i.e. no taper :)

 

In the three weight range i really like SA GPX lines.  they are a little on the heavy side but it seems to work for my St. croix avid pretty nicely and that is a moderate action rod.

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Thanks for the advice, flyfisher.

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