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I have recently decided to embark on the Kayak endeavor. I have done some research, and have narrowed my choices down to 2 kayaks, the Ascend FS10 sit-in, and the Ascend FS12T sit-on-top. I am 6' 2'' 240 lbs and will be fishing primarily lakes and ponds. I went to BPS and looked at both kayaks, and they each had pros and cons for what I was wanting. 

 

What are your opinions of pros and cons of each? 

What kind of rigging and customization should I look into doing?

What are some of your best functionality tips for yak fishing?

 

 

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I would definitely get the FS12T. A sit-on-top is much more functional for fishing and 10ft is gonna get real small real fast.

Definitely rig up an anchor trolley and some rod holders.

I almost bought an FS12T before finding my Slayer on CL.

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For maneuverability, the smaller kayak will probably turn sharper and get you into tighter spots, but really, each will turn on a dime compared to any full sized boat on the market. This would only be important if you were looking to navigate small streams that have a lot of closely spaced rocks to dodge (which it sounds like you don't plan to do). Since you indicated that you were eyeballing ponds and lakes and you are 6'2" and 240#, I would probably go for the 12ft if you have the means and ability to store and transport it. My personal preference is to sit higher to scout and read the water a bit more, which you might be able to do better from the sit-on too.

Sitting higher in the 12 foot raises your center of gravity and increases the likelihood of tipping, but this is offset by the added length of the bigger kayak which gives it extra stability. Just look into stabilizer pontoons to add on. They can be really pricey to order, but are dirt cheap to make yourself. I found a really good link to a website for a guy that did this and kept a running blog of all of the extensive nods he made himself on a canoe. I'll have to come back later to share the link because I am on a really old tablet right now that will only let me open one app at a time.

If loading, storing, or the price of the bigger yak would be an issue--go with the smaller one. You'd get along fine with it too. I'm just leaning more toward the 12 from what you described.

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Go with the FS12T. Fishing is really much better 

from a SOT. This is not just my opinion, but in 

speaking with other kayak fisherfolk, and part 

of the reason most fishing kayaks are SOT or 

hybrid models with open cockpits.

 

I'm smaller than you, and started with a 10' SOT. 

It is very maneuverable, but when I upgraded to 

a 12' Native Ultimate, life was SO much better.

 

Now if I had a 10' that I could stand in....

 

I have a pretty good sense of balance and sit 

on top of the gunnels on my Ultimate. So for me 

tippiness is relative. Never a problem with my 

center of gravity, and I also stand to fish often.

 

Get a good PFD, a light (quality) paddle, and 

put an anchor trolley on both sides.

 

I'd also recommend an anchor pin of some kind. 

I use mine more than an anchor - in fact, I hardly 

ever take an anchor with me, but my Stick-It pin

is always mounted.

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You guys are giving me some really great advice, I truly appreciate it. This is a big endeavor for me and I want to know as much as possible before I buy.

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For maneuverability, the smaller kayak will probably turn sharper and get you into tighter spots, but really, each will turn on a dime compared to any full sized boat on the market. This would only be important if you were looking to navigate small streams that have a lot of closely spaced rocks to dodge (which it sounds like you don't plan to do). Since you indicated that you were eyeballing ponds and lakes and you are 6'2" and 240#, I would probably go for the 12ft if you have the means and ability to store and transport it. My personal preference is to sit higher to scout and read the water a bit more, which you might be able to do better from the sit-on too.

Sitting higher in the 12 foot raises your center of gravity and increases the likelihood of tipping, but this is offset by the added length of the bigger kayak which gives it extra stability. Just look into stabilizer pontoons to add on. They can be really pricey to order, but are dirt cheap to make yourself. I found a really good link to a website for a guy that did this and kept a running blog of all of the extensive nods he made himself on a canoe. I'll have to come back later to share the link because I am on a really old tablet right now that will only let me open one app at a time.

If loading, storing, or the price of the bigger yak would be an issue--go with the smaller one. You'd get along fine with it too. I'm just leaning more toward the 12 from what you described.

Can you supply me with that link? I love DIY stuff, makes one feel self-sufficient so to speak.

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Go with the FS12T. Fishing is really much better 

from a SOT. This is not just my opinion, but in 

speaking with other kayak fisherfolk, and part 

of the reason most fishing kayaks are SOT or 

hybrid models with open cockpits.

 

I'm smaller than you, and started with a 10' SOT. 

It is very maneuverable, but when I upgraded to 

a 12' Native Ultimate, life was SO much better.

 

Now if I had a 10' that I could stand in....

 

I have a pretty good sense of balance and sit 

on top of the gunnels on my Ultimate. So for me 

tippiness is relative. Never a problem with my 

center of gravity, and I also stand to fish often.

 

Get a good PFD, a light (quality) paddle, and 

put an anchor trolley on both sides.

 

I'd also recommend an anchor pin of some kind. 

I use mine more than an anchor - in fact, I hardly 

ever take an anchor with me, but my Stick-It pin

is always mounted.

 

I will probably be transporting this yak on-top of a 2000 Honda Accord for a few months. Do you think the FS12T will be too much for me to transport?

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Can you supply me with that link? I love DIY stuff, makes one feel self-sufficient so to speak.

 

 

Sure thing. Sorry I was out of town all day, so I just got home to dig it out of my saved "fishing stuff" file.

 

http://www.jaxkayakfishing.com/phpBB/topic30202.html

 

 

Looks like he used PVC pipe and lobster/crab trap marker buoys. They look REALLY good and I priced the floats at like $18 on Amazon.

 

Enjoy!

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I will probably be transporting this yak on-top of a 2000 Honda Accord for a few months. Do you think the FS12T will be too much for me to transport?

 

Not going to be a problem at all as long as you have good tie downs. I assume you have a roof rack? If not, you can buy aftermarket "universal" ones that fit on the inside of your door frame. They aren't permanent, and they aren't expensive.

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Not going to be a problem at all as long as you have good tie downs. I assume you have a roof rack? If not, you can buy aftermarket "universal" ones that fit on the inside of your door frame. They aren't permanent, and they aren't expensive.

Yeah I will be going cheap and simple when it comes to the roof rack at first. I plan on getting a truck later next year when the year end clearance goes on! But until then, The ole accord will cut it. Thanks again for the link!

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