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So I've heard arguments for using higher priced fluoro, but when it comes to higher pound test/applications, I've noticed people tend not to use the more expensive stuff. Does sensitivity just drop off with higher pound test or what?

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Actually, stretch should be less (ie. More controlled) @ higher # test

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Is there a relationship between stretch and sensitivity? I'm actually legitimately thinking of doing a special topics course for my undergrad on this stuff, I studying engineering physics at Illinois

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Is there a relationship between stretch and sensitivity? I'm actually legitimately thinking of doing a special topics course for my undergrad on this stuff, I studying engineering physics at Illinois

In another post you said Sniper is the best? Shouldn't you already know about stretch and sensitivity?

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So lines like Sunlines Reaction FC will have less sensitivity than others at the quality point. Its marketed with having a little more stretch for moving baits.

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In another post you said Sniper is the best? Shouldn't you already know about stretch and sensitivity?

I've had less lost fish and less line breaks with Sniper. I've also only really used fluoro for jigs and finesse stuff. Rarely moving baits. I'd assume that I can sniper has a lower stretch, therefore the reason I've had more hookups.

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So lines like Sunlines Reaction FC will have less sensitivity than others at the quality point. Its marketed with having a little more stretch for moving baits.

Yep. The more stretch, less sensitivity. The line will be more manageable and knot better the softer it is though. Sniper is middle of the road, as far as stretch.
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Is there a relationship between stretch and sensitivity? I'm actually legitimately thinking of doing a special topics course for my undergrad on this stuff, I studying engineering physics at Illinois

 

The less stretch the more vibration will be transmitted through the line to your rod/reel and finger.

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My recommendation is to not get too caught up in the concept of stretch vs. sensitivity - it's pretty much oversold. If you want to focus more on something, look at tension.

 

To your main point, I use some of the more expensive heavier pound test fluorocarbons, and sensitivity doesn't drop off at all. It couldn't, because the material composition of the line is still the same regardless of pound test. That is where you see the real differences, not in the fact that one line stretches 3% less (just an example) than another. Fluorocarbon will always be more sensitive than mono/copoly based lines because of its greater density, not amount of stretch. Its modulus of elasticity (resistance to stretch) is actually nearly the same as nylon. Superlines, on the other hand, are more sensitive than either (when taut) because their modulus of elasticity is 30-50 times greater than fluoro or mono/copoly. You are actually dealing with displacement as opposed to transfer of energy. You simply can't change that, making regular nylon line something it isn't, because it's still made up of, and therefor limited by, the properties of the various nylon polymers that go into it.

 

-T9

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Line sensitivity is almost solely dependent on stretch.

Actually, line sensitivity in flourocarbons is due to the density, or molecular structure of the line. Stretch is dependent on that, not visa versa. 

Mr. Riley will learn that relationship along with line diameter in it's relationship to water resistance in his studies.  Sounds like a great topic for a research project.  Good Luck

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My recommendation is to not get too caught up in the concept of stretch vs. sensitivity - it's pretty much oversold. If you want to focus more on something, look at tension.

 

To your main point, I use some of the more expensive heavier pound test fluorocarbons, and sensitivity doesn't drop off at all. It couldn't, because the material composition of the line is still the same regardless of pound test. That is where you see the real differences, not in the fact that one line stretches 3% less (just an example) than another. Fluorocarbon will always be more sensitive than mono/copoly based lines because of its greater density, not amount of stretch. Its modulus of elasticity (resistance to stretch) is actually nearly the same as nylon. Superlines, on the other hand, are more sensitive than either (when taut) because their modulus of elasticity is 30-50 times greater than fluoro or mono/copoly. You are actually dealing with displacement as opposed to transfer of energy. You simply can't change that, making regular nylon line something it isn't, because it's still made up of, and therefor limited by, the properties of the various nylon polymers that go into it.

 

-T9

 

It is true that stretch is similar, but Fluoro is a controlled stretch, and locks down a lot quicker than a nylon based line.

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It is true that stretch is similar, but Fluoro is a controlled stretch, and locks down a lot quicker than a nylon based line.

 

Show me one set of data that supports that theory and I'll gladly reconsider my position, as I've never seen it. At this point, I just consider that explanation another of the many myths perpetuated about fluorocarbon. I've carried out my own tests in that regard and have not seen this happen with any sample I tested. It doesn't matter whether you test it with 1 ounce of force or several pounds of force, the mono and the fluoro basically stretch the same. The only difference I've seen in the data is that with fluorocarbon, you go from an elastic state to a plastic state with roughly half the force required vs. nylon monos, which is where I think people get this "controlled stretch" idea from.

 

-T9

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Team9 is spot on... I posted this in another thread on the subject, it's a good read...(I'm not affiliated in any way to that site, just something I found a while ago)

 

http://www.bigindianabass.com/big_indiana_bass/the-truth-about-fluorocarbon.html

 

 

It would probably help with a project :).  Lot's of good info there, this entire stretch argument is covered in detail for those interested.  

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Team9 is spot on... I posted this in another thread on the subject, it's a good read...(I'm not affiliated in any way to that site, just something I found a while ago)

http://www.bigindianabass.com/big_indiana_bass/the-truth-about-fluorocarbon.html

It would probably help with a project :). Lot's of good info there, this entire stretch argument is covered in detail for those interested.

That site has a lot of great information. His stretch test, however, doesn't tell much. He only uses 2 different kinds of line, and they're not even premium lines. It's true that fluorocarbon does stretch, and more than mono in some instances; there are several that stretch as much as 7-10% less than certain monofilaments and fluoros though, which is a big difference.

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That site has a lot of great information. His stretch test, however, doesn't tell much. He only uses 2 different kinds of line, and they're not even premium lines. It's true that fluorocarbon does stretch, and more than mono in some instances; there are several that stretch as much as 7-10% less than certain monofilaments and fluoros though, which is a big difference.

I know it's not exactly what we're talking about here, but it talks about the subject of stretch as it relates to sensitivity....  Team9 touched on that with his post.  

 

The article was comparing the physical properties of flouro/mono...Not a multi-brand shootout test like what Tackle-Tour has done, which is probably why he didn't include a wide range of lines.  Since the thread was talking about the physical properties of the lines I thought it was a good addition to the discussion :).

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So I've heard arguments for using higher priced fluoro, but when it comes to higher pound test/applications, I've noticed people tend not to use the more expensive stuff. Does sensitivity just drop off with higher pound test or what?

 

I don't feel that the sensitivity drops off for me.  I'm not a scientist and don't know much about density, molecular structure or lab tested stretch.  But I do know what I can feel and I know what it's like to set into a fish and have it not move...  20 lb Sunline Sniper is one of my favorite lines overall.  It is a bit stiffer in that lb test so it can be difficult fishing in heavier winds as far as casting goes. 

I think visibility is one of the main factors that people look at when discussing fluoro, for that reason I think a lot of people also stick with lower lb test in fluoro. 

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I know it's not exactly what we're talking about here, but it talks about the subject of stretch as it relates to sensitivity....  Team9 touched on that with his post.  

 

The article was comparing the physical properties of flouro/mono...Not a multi-brand shootout test like what Tackle-Tour has done, which is probably why he didn't include a wide range of lines.  Since the thread was talking about the physical properties of the lines I thought it was a good addition to the discussion :).

 

Yep - It's all about the basic physical properties inherent in each line type. Seems like some believe that only certain brands of fluoro are made as low stretch lines, but that's not the case. For every stretchy mono someone mentions, you can name a fluorocarbon line that will stretch more. Likewise, for every low stretch fluorocarbon line someone uses as an example, you could easily name a monofilament that will have less stretch than their fluoro example. It's not the brand, it's the properties - and it's certainly not the "stretch" that makes those two line types unique. 

 

-T9

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