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TedderX

Fly Fishing

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1. Why are fly fishing rods so long?  Like 9 foot and such.  Especially in the east, where there are so many trees on rivers.

2. Fly fishing rods used to be made of cane.  Are they as good as modern graphite and such? Better? Worse?

3. Why do fly fishing reels have a drag on them, if "typically" you pull a fish in by the line?

4. How important is floating fly line vs. sinking fly line?

 

 

 

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TedderX, that is why I don't fly fish. :) 

No really, I tried it and didn't like it. Prefer
spinning and casting, myself.

Now when you talk Tenkara, or long pole
fishing, that's a different story.

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1 hour ago, TedderX said:

1. Why are fly fishing rods so long?  Like 9 foot and such.  Especially in the east, where there are so many trees on rivers.

2. Fly fishing rods used to be made of cane.  Are they as good as modern graphite and such? Better? Worse?

3. Why do fly fishing reels have a drag on them, if "typically" you pull a fish in by the line?

4. How important is floating fly line vs. sinking fly line?

 

 

 

1. I have many rods for many uses. As you said I have a one weight that is 6 foot that I use on small native streams

2. Yes the new rods are much better as far as sensitivity goes.

3. I strip in smaller fish but bigger fish that is going to be a long fight I always get on the reel

4. Can't fish topwatter flies with sinking line but you can fish nymphs and others that sink with floating line

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On May 20, 2016 at 6:34 PM, TedderX said:

1. Why are fly fishing rods so long?  Like 9 foot and such.  Especially in the east, where there are so many trees on rivers.

2. Fly fishing rods used to be made of cane.  Are they as good as modern graphite and such? Better? Worse?

3. Why do fly fishing reels have a drag on them, if "typically" you pull a fish in by the line?

4. How important is floating fly line vs. sinking fly line?

1. The long length makes it easier to pick line up off the water for casting, makes long casts easier, makes it easier to mend the line to get drag-free drifting of dry flies, makes "high stick" nymphing easier, etc.

2. Cane gives much slower action than modern materials, which some find advantageous for certain fishing.  It is also much more resistant to damage from hook impacts, weakening from vibrating against a boat gunwale while underway, etc., and has that classic, old-time look and feel that some love.  I fish graphite rods.

3. The drag is there if you need it!  Lots of small, single-action reels have only the light drag of a clicker to prevent spool over-run, but a drag is pretty nice to have if you hook into a big one!  The fly fishing tippet can be of some pretty low pound-test rating and a quality drag can be a great advantage.

4. A floating line is the most-used line for most fly fisherman.  You can fish floating and sinking flies and bugs with a floater.  For deeper fishing, there are sink-tip and full-sinking lines.

Get a fly rod outfit with the proper matching line, some casting pointers from an experienced fly fisherman, a few reference books and maybe a casting DVD or two, and have some fun!

Tight lines,

Bob

 

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1-You are casting the line not the lure on the end so having a longer rod makes it easier to pull up line.  There are also lots of ways to cast without having the length of the rod get in the way but like others, i have a shorter rod for mountain streams.

2-I am not a fan of slow action cane rods myself...i'll take graphite 

3-depending on the species and cover, drag is not needed.  Most reels you can also palm the spool as it spins to create drag.  All that being said, when you get into a carp or something big, it is nice to have the reel to bring the fish in with.  I rarely use the reel to bring in fish because i couldn't strip them in but it is more so I can get the line out of my way.

4-I prefer a floater for 95% of the situations i fish but those 5% dictate a sink tip or even a full sinking line.  If i feel like i need a sinking line though i generally go with conventional gear as casting a sinking line all day is kind of tedious.

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1. Why are fly fishing rods so long?  Like 9 foot and such.  Especially in the east, where there are so many trees on rivers.

Generate momentum to cast a lure that weighs less than the line casting it.

2. Fly fishing rods used to be made of cane.  Are they as good as modern graphite and such? Better? Worse?

Not even close. Modern materials are hard to beat. Even some of the budget rods are good.  

3. Why do fly fishing reels have a drag on them, if "typically" you pull a fish in by the line?

Heh, good question. I have only used mine a few times, never really needed it yet. But for salmon, big trout, pike, etc you'll definitely want it.

4. How important is floating fly line vs. sinking fly line?

Very important possibly. Depends on what you're fishing with and for.

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