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Finesse Baitcaster Insight Needed

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I am looking at getting a setup for throwing light bait applications such as ned rigs, shakey heads, small jigs etc. I have the rod nailed down but am looking at which baitcaster would be best for this sort of setup. As of making this, I am torn between the Curado 70 and the Tatula SV TWS. I see that the Curado has a shallower spool which would have less moment of inertia, but the Daiwa has the TWS which allows the line to exit more freely from the spool itself. If anyone has any insight on these two reels it would be greatly appreciated, thanks.

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I have a normal Tatula CT with a rays diy shallow spool and it's amazingly easy with light baits, will absolutely launch a 1/8 head with a 3" spark shad, and lighter baits are trouble free too. Very impressed.

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1 hour ago, Tim Kelly said:

I have a normal Tatula CT with a rays diy shallow spool and it's amazingly easy with light baits, will absolutely launch a 1/8 head with a 3" spark shad, and lighter baits are trouble free too. Very impressed.

This^^^^Put 10# Fluoro or 8# braid and light baits are easy to cast a good distance..I can cast a 1/16TX Rig 7” Power Worm quite far

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Daiwa

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I just got a Tatula SV TWS recently and have been more than impressed with how easy it is to throw small baits. Really any baits. It’s just all around a great reel IMO. 

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So do you think the performance would still be better on the TWS compared to the Curado without the aftermarket spool?

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1/8th ounce comparison 

not my video

I have both prefer the 70 as well.

 

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I appreciate the video link @QUAKEnSHAKE , it was an interesting video but I feel as if it was a bit biased towards the Curado. He seemed to be casting into the wind with the Daiwa while casting with the wind with the Curado.  One thing I did find very interesting was that even though the Shimano spool is much shallower, the Daiwa spool by itself is lighter. When he weighed the spools with line in, the Daiwa was still lighter overall. This shows me that although I see a lot of people saying the Curado will bomb lures farther, the SV spool coupled with the TWS seems to be able to cast lighter lures further. Along with that I have been seeing that the SV spool seems to be quite good for skipping lures because of it being lighter.

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I could be wrong (no surprise there :(), but I think the SV braking is probably what makes it a good skipping reel rather than its light spool weight.

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@new2BC4bass Is there an altered braking system with the SV spools as compared to the non SV's? If so I was not aware, which definitely could make a difference. However, the lighter the spool the less inertia it will generate during the cast. The less inertia it has the less it will overrun. A combination of both most likely.

 

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Yes.  Absolutely.  Almost anyone concerned about getting maximum distance would bypass an SV spooled reel.  It has more braking force than a non SV spool.  Their are plenty of posts where the poster preferred a Tatula CT to a Tatula SV for a general purpose reel.  The SV excels at lighter weights and skipping.  I haven't confirmed that with either of my reels yet, but that is what I read all the time.  :teeth:

 

I felt my first SV reel was over-braked.  It also was backlashing pretty easily.  Took a trip to a tuner where he not only upgraded the reel, but did some work on the spool.  Great reel now.  Did not have that problem with my next SV reel (a Tatula).  I also feel I am getting pretty good distance with both.

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So what is the difference in the braking system between the reels with the SV spools and non SV spools? I'm a bit confused between whether there is an actual difference in the braking system or if the lighter spool just doesn't cast the average lure as far.

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I believe the difference between the SV system and the Mag z system is mostly with the spool. The reel still uses magnetic force applied to the inductor, though the amount probably varies from reel to reel. The inductor on the SV spools rotates a bit as well as moving in and out, where I believe most Mag z spools only move in and out. 

 

I might not have that 100% right but it's the gist of it. 

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As other mentioned braking system is the same Mag Force System with inductor moving in and out, but differential is line of spool concept where SV spool has air brake system where inductor move in-out and rotate the same time.

I don't have Tatula SV, but have Alphas SV, and I agreed with @new2BC4bassthat SV spool got a lot of brake force compare to Curado 70 with educated thump.

I prefer Curado 70/50e on Lure weight 3/16 - 1/4 but 1/8 oz or windy situation, Daiwa get the most used.

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