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Spinning vs Casting for cranking

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I want to buy a new combo for mainly cranking and I was thinking the bps extreme reel with the low gears but then I thought all spinning is usually low geared and would allow me to crank slow plus I can cast farther on spinning gear since I haven't mastered baitcasting yet so I was wondering if there was an advantage to having a b/c set up for cranking or if it really mattered which one I used. Thanks for your input!

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Casting reels once you get the hang of them will outcast any spin cast.  Add to that the cast reels are much stronger and will enable you to horse the bass out of cover easier.

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I want to buy a new combo for mainly cranking and I was thinking the bps extreme reel with the low gears but then I thought all spinning is usually low geared and would allow me to crank slow plus I can cast farther on spinning gear since I haven't mastered baitcasting yet so I was wondering if there was an advantage to having a b/c set up for cranking or if it really mattered which one I used. Thanks for your input!

You initial thought about spinning gears having lower gear ratios is usually true, but what you do not realize is that you cannot equate this supposed low gear ratio to those from casting reels.

Spools on spinning reels can be big and as a result, they can recover more line than a typical casting reel despite their "lower" gear ratio.

Take a look at the 2500 Symetre FJ. It a gear ratio of 6.2:1 which is lower that the typical "burner" casting reel, yet it recovers 35" of line, which is more than a burner reel.

I like to use both setups for cranks.  If the casting reel can toss it, I'd probably use it because of the lower line recovery rate, but on the other side of the coin, spinning rigs cast lighter cranks more easily.

Bottom line I think it boils down to personal preference. Cranking with a spinning rig feels more comfortable to me, but I do use both.

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I want to buy a new combo for mainly cranking and I was thinking the bps extreme reel with the low gears but then I thought all spinning is usually low geared and would allow me to crank slow plus I can cast farther on spinning gear since I haven't mastered baitcasting yet so I was wondering if there was an advantage to having a b/c set up for cranking or if it really mattered which one I used. Thanks for your input!

You initial thought about spinning gears having lower gear ratios is usually true, but what you do not realize is that you cannot equate this supposed low gear ratio to those from casting reels.

Spools on spinning reels can be big and as a result, they can recover more line than a typical casting reel despite their "lower" gear ratio.

Take a look at the 2500 Symetre FJ. It a gear ratio of 6.2:1 which is lower that the typical "burner" casting reel, yet it recovers 35" of line, which is more than a burner reel.

I like to use both setups for cranks. If the casting reel can toss it, I'd probably use it because of the lower line recovery rate, but on the other side of the coin, spinning rigs cast lighter cranks more easily.

Bottom line I think it boils down to personal preference. Cranking with a spinning rig feels more comfortable to me, but I do use both.

That's what I like about BPS's website they list the recovery rate for most reels. I just got a new KVD baitcaster for cranking that has a 5.1.1 ratio the brings in 21inches per crank. It was nice to be able to compare it to other reels and ratio's. I also have a crazy theory about spinning reels. With spinning reels I often don't have a very steady retrieve it sputters in a strange erratic action. This action seemed to give me more reaction strikes on buzz frogs and other baits. I prefer the feel of baitcasting equipment and don't use spinning reels often but I guess it's my new year resolution to try and use the spinning set up more often. Also Hunt4Hawgs if your going to throw some large cranks a baitcaster is the way to go.

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If you plan on mounting your new reel on a dedicated crankbait rod, you'll have a much harder time finding a crank-specific spinning rod. You can find rods that will work, but there are definitely more options in bait casting rods.

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Casting reels once you get the hang of them will outcast any spin cast. Add to that the cast reels are much stronger and will enable you to horse the bass out of cover easier.

I don't agree with this at all. Too many I know can both outcast with spinning reels versus bait casters, and pull fish out. Depends on the person. I do agree there are more crankbait specific rods in bc versus spinning, but you'll need to explore, research & choose your rods accordingly. :)

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I'd definitely go with a baitcaster. Spinning reels generally have a high IPT (inches per turn), which will prevent your crankbait from reaching its maximum depth unless you crank extra slowly. Also, there are much more crankbait dedicated rods made for baitcasting reels than there are for spinning reels.

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Hey Hunt,

There is a technique called "Finesse Crankbait Fishing" with a spinning rig.

It is for small crankbaits on light line (4 or 6 pound test) and for those of us who wish to fish crankbaits finesse style.

However, I don't use this technique as I throw all cranks on a baitcaster using a Curado 200E5.

First time I threw my new Ghost Minnow 1.5 crank using the new Curado 200E5 I caught 7 bass at my local pond in an hour.

I put the reel on a BPS Crankin Stick and it works great.

Just food for thought.  :)

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Casting reels once you get the hang of them will outcast any spin cast. Add to that the cast reels are much stronger and will enable you to horse the bass out of cover easier.

I don't agree with this at all. Too many I know can both outcast with spinning reels versus bait casters, and pull fish out. Depends on the person. I do agree there are more crankbait specific rods in bc versus spinning, but you'll need to explore, research & choose your rods accordingly. :)

I used to think the same way until I got my first good BC set up. I was never able to cast even half way cross the river with my spinning rod, now I can put my cranks on the other shore with a BC, big difference. There isn't a spinning outfit made that has more drag and more back bone than a bc outfit. Medium spinning rods handle lures from 1/8 to 5/8 oz, a bc medium 1/4 to 1 ounce, no comparision in strength, back bone, or the ablility to pull em out of cover. The main reason I got a BC was that I was sick and tired of poor hooksets with worms, jigs, etc using a spinning set up. Got a BC and the problem disappeared, if I could find a bc that would throw 1/8 ounce trout lures I wouldn't even own a spinning reel.  Besides that try throwing a 3/4 ounce deep diver on a spinning rod, just don't work.  If you are throwing small and I mean small crankbaits you may consider a spinning rod, but I don't know of any crankbaits that my BC can't handle efficiently.

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I use baitcasters for all my lures except soft plastics. I cant say why but I like the worms,tubes and lizards on my spinning outfit. As someone else mention, no spinning outfits drag can match the drag of any baitcaster for hauling in the bigger fish.

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I use baitcasters for all my lures except soft plastics. I cant say why but I like the worms,tubes and lizards on my spinning outfit. As someone else mention, no spinning outfits drag can match the drag of any baitcaster for hauling in the bigger fish.

Not to start an argument, but you might want to check the stats on some of the larger spinning reels before making a blanket statement like that. My Shimano Sahara 4000FB has a 17# drag, which is substantially more than many of the common low-profile baitcasters.

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I would never fish any moving lure with a spinning outfit period. It will wear you out if you are planning to throw any crank over 1/4oz. Baitcasters offer you much more control and you will bomb cranks once you get it down. You are really limiting yourself to what you can do if you don't get a baitcasting setup.

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There isn't a spinning outfit made that has more drag and more back bone than a bc outfit. Medium spinning rods handle lures from 1/8 to 5/8 oz, a bc medium 1/4 to 1 ounce, no comparision in strength, back bone, or the ablility to pull em out of cover. The main reason I got a BC was that I was sick and tired of poor hooksets with worms, jigs, etc using a spinning set up.

We'll have to agree to disagree. I have M/MH spinning rods that easily handle 3/4 ounce with no problem. Comparable in backbone as well. Regarding the drag issue, probably, but there are higher end spinning reels that have high drag limits. I would be fishing my bc for worms, senkos, jigs anyways, but a properly matched spinning rod/reel easily handles crankbaits up to 3/4 ounce. And again, it is what someone is more comfortable with. 8-)

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