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uicdent11

Daiwa Braking system

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I was wondering what is the mechanism behind the daiwa breaking system on their reels. Also, what is the big difference between their "v" and "z" system. From my understanding it is a magnetic break system. How does it compare to the way the garcia's work? And my last question would be, would it better to stick to one breaking system for all your reels? Anybody that uses multiple breaking systems, I would love to hear your input on this. Thanks a lot guys.

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daiwa's magforce-V and magforce-Z employ an arbor on one end of the spool that can move closer and farther from the magnets to vary the braking force based on the how fast the spool is spinning. therefore, max braking when the spool is spinning the fastest and is most needed and less braking when it is less needed. daiwa can explain it better than i can: http://www.daiwa.com/Reel/pop_magforce.aspx. as for the difference between magforce-V and Z, Z supposedly kicks in later when the spool speed is higher and provides less braking at high speeds...this system is aimed at working better with lighter lures. of all magnetic braking systems available, daiwa's are probably the smartest and most-advanced.

in most* other brand reels using magnetic braking, the relationship between the spool and the magnets is fixed during the cast. in other words, the distance between the spool and the magnets stays constant throughout the cast. because passive systems like this do not vary the braking force according to spool speed, they can be picky, requiring you to set the mag dial to match your lure weight AND how hard you're going to cast. now, a lot of people are really good doing this on the fly and can do it so intuitively, they don't even think about it. this also becomes easier if you use all the same brand reels.

*the only other recent braking system i'm aware of that employed variable braking force was pflueger's "inertial transfer braking" (ITB). some bass pro shops reels based on pflueger designs also used ITB. ITB used a spring-mounted disk on the side of spool that moved closer/farther from the set of magnets in the sideplate. i had some ITB-equipped reels and found them to work extremely well. for some reason, pflueger dropped ITB and moved over to a "dual braking" scheme wherein they employ centrifrugal brakes AND a dumb (passive) magnetic brake system.

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Frank,

Thanks for the great information. I had some birds nest problems with my revo sx  when I first got it. I have since bought a shimano mg and although I haven't used it on the water, it seems to cast very easily in the yard. I am looking for something with what I understand a variable breaking system. Although they use a different mechanism, it sounds like the Daiwa and Shimano have the same concept, less brake as the spool speeds up? The reason I initially asked the questions is because I am new to baitcasters and I found the centrifugal to work well and was wondering what other brands use a similar braking system. Thanks for your help btw.

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nope...the daiwa and shimano braking systems are only similar in that they apply a varying amount of braking force according to spool speed. but, shimanos do not use magnetic brakes at all; instead, they rely on tried-and-true centrifrugal brakes...the faster the spool spins, the harder little brakes attached to the spool rub against a raceway inside the reel slowing it down. centrifrugal brakes are simple but work amazingly well. its interesting to note that the most expensive revo reel, the skeet reese edition, is a modified revo premier but without the mag brakes and centrifrugals in their place. also, the revo S and winch models also use centrifrugal brakes instead of magnets.

when people are first learning how to baitcast, i always start them off on a reel with centrifrugal brakes because they're easier to use and less to futz around with. i've been using baitcasters for decades and still had problems with casting the SX consistently.

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That is what I meant about the similarities in that they are both variable. I find it interesting that you had similar problems with the sx. I thought it was just me. Do you throw any diawas? I was just wondering if you could compare them to the shimano's. Thanks again,

Jon

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If you backlash a Revo SX then you're going to backlash a Daiwa... It's all about how you set the cast control on the Revo. Micro explained it best...search for his post on how to properly adjust the cast control and brake on your Revo. Had I read his explanation first...I would have saved myself a couple spools of line and a bunch of frustration. Once you get it figured out you won't get backlash problems.

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jon, i throw them all. just in the last 18 months or so, i bought 6 abu garcias, 5 daiwas, 8 shimanos, 2 pfluegers, 2 quantums and 4 BPS (3 out of all of these were spinning reels, not baitcasters)...each had things i liked and things i didn't.

out of all of them though, i would have to single out my two revo SXs as the reels that really drove me nuts. as i've said before, when they're adjusted just right and i'm in a groove, they're absolutely phenomenal. if i get excited (say, because the shad are boiling around the boat) and i rush a cast, it's all too easy to get messed up. with the SX, you always have to remember that the reel won't adjust to you...you have to adjust to the reel (the dial settings and the way you cast). btw, micro's setup advice (essentially, turn your cast control knob tighter than you think you need to) is good but that's only for casting...for pitchin', you need a looser setting.

for daiwas, i have two fuegos but would like to add a sol and a zillion crazy cranker. for the shimanos, i have curados, citicas and a chronarch. they're all excellent, but different (if that makes any sense). for that matter, revo S's are excellent too and not at all picky and very easy to use. what exactly did you want to know?

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Frank,

I just wanted to hear from somebody who currently uses reels with different braking systems. You have pretty much hit everything I wanted to know right on the head. I use lefties which means Daiwa, Shimano, BPS,and Garcia have the greatest selection of reels for me. I am looking to add a 7.1:1 to my arsenal and since I am relatively new to baitcasters, I wanted to do some research on the braking before I spent the money. You have answered a lot of my questions and now I think I just need to handle a couple of the reels at BPS to see what feel I like the most. Hopefully I can pick one out before the ice melts here in Chicago. Thanks again for all your help.

Jon

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jon, just keep in mind that almost all reels feel really smooth when they're not under load and there's no line on them. also, at BPS, they loosen the cast control knobs on all their display baitcasters as far as they will go so they will spin super easily.

i'd recommend that you only consider reels with a solid, one-piece aluminum frame (or magnesium, if you have the bucks  ;D). a rigid frame keeps all the internals aligned and minimizes flexing so the reel stays smooth under load.

there are some inexpensive but sexy-looking reels out there that feel great in the store but squeak and whine and feel loose and rough while actually fishing.

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Thanks for the advice. I think I have narrowed it down to a few. I would love to have the curado e7 or would even consider the quantum energy, but my wallet is saying to check out the BPS pro qualifier and Daiwa TD pro. I do not know which has the better frame, but they are the only reels in my price range that come lefty in the 7.1:1 gear ratio. I would think most on here would say curado and I think it would benefit me most, as a noob, to stick with a similar braking system for my reels. The new reel would be added to 2 mg's and a winch. Thanks again for all your help and we'll see what I come home with, if any, after this weekend.

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