Jump to content

Fall Patterns for New England....?


Walkingboss

Recommended Posts

I'm originally from Indiana and have only been fishing out here for a few years.  Fall has always been my favorite time to fish, but I haven't had the 'go-to' success in New England like I did in the midwest, where we have resevoirs and SHAD!

I last fished the last week of Sept. and the fish hadn't yet committed to a fall pattern.  The recent cool weather and rain (thank God) should ease them along toward a feeding binge.  

Long story shorter...If I was back home I'd hit the creek arms and points just off them looking for schools of shad getting forced to shore.  No shad out here....Winni does have smelt, but should I be following them or sticking to a crawfish pattern (jigs, etc.)?  Water temps should be in the mid 50's to 60.  I plan on looking for milfoil and other still-green vegetation in 5+' of water, flats in 10-15' of water, mid-lake humps rising from 40+' of water, and anywhere I can find current, although it's illegal here to fish within 250 yards of any tributary this time of year because of the stupid landlocked salmon spawn.

Any solid advice from kind New England folk would be appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm from NH, but....

I wish I could help you out, but the fish are confusing the heck out of me right now. It almost seems like they are in their summer patterns due to the warm water. All the bigger fish I've caught lately (besides pickeral) have been in pretty deep water.

I saw smallies cruising flats last week on Thursday, and caught a bunch...I have not seen them since.

Also, my senkos are not working as well, and my Rapalla silver F-11 and F-9 seem to be working better again for smallies.  Seems like they are keying in on baitfish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lack of Shad syndrome, I hear ya!  When I read reports from guys further south about shad being pushed into the back waters, I get so jealous I could pop.

We have a lot of success with anything you can fish on the bottom and slowly.

Jigs

Shakeys

drop shots

Most soft platics

The key is SLOW.  And go deeper than normally.  These fish bed down in the deep grasses.  They often migrate during the peak warming hours to forage the bait that has gathered around the rocks.  Rocks are radiators in the spring and fall, USE 'EM!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LBH,

Agreed, I hate reading articles that mention Shad movement this time of year. No such for us here in N.E.

I have seen some balls of baitfish but they have not resulted in a pattern.

I have had the opposite experience this fall with regard to bait types and retrieve speed.

I have caught very well on spinner baits and top water.

Burn those spinner baits to make a wake and quick retrieve on the top water especially if they are short hitting it.

Catching real well around humps with dying weeds. The deeper the water around the humps the bigger the fish have been.

With regards to the rocks - True very true. Expecially the bucket mouths.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well there is a catch here for me. Agreed we dont have shad like in other parts of the country. They will still smack the snot out of yellow perch and gobble up any crawfish. Those are the patterns I go by when fishing lakes around me. Now for my home lake that has a very healthy population of landlocked alewife. Its mostly a baitfish pattern. Now Walkingboss I know you are a Jig fisherman this easily one of the best times to use it and be rewarded with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have caught very well on spinner baits and top water.

I haven't thrown a s/b in years, I need to get back on 'em next yr a bit.

Within days of the harvest moon, our water finally turned.  Topwater bite seized up like an Edsel with no oil.  ;D :'( Catching a fish in the upper 1/2 of the water column will take some killer magic or a huge horseshoe now.

Craws, craws, craws,....that's the menu in our lake for the rest of the season.  Even the plastics will dwindle in these next few weeks for me anyway.  Jigs will be the staple by the end of the month.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have caught very well on spinner baits and top water.

I haven't thrown a s/b in years, I need to get back on 'em next yr a bit.

Within days of the harvest moon, our water finally turned.  Topwater bite seized up like an Edsel with no oil.  ;D :'( Catching a fish in the upper 1/2 of the water column will take some killer magic or a huge horseshoe now.

Craws, craws, craws,....that's the menu in our lake for the rest of the season.  Even the plastics will dwindle in these next few weeks for me anyway.  Jigs will be the staple by the end of the month.

Really?

I was killing them on topwater on this passed Monday. Our frenzy of crankbait fishing hasnt yet begun, and I am in NH.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Topwater's been hot around this area too in most of the ponds I fish (Connecticut).  Been killin' 'em on frogs buzzed on the surface.  Jig bite hasn't been too hot, but soon I will probably be using jigs almost exclusively, especially after this little front.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's the way this particular lake is.  we haven't seen a topwater bite since the 3rd day after the moon.  It sure isn't from a lack of throwing either.  My D.O. meter is broken but this is what I always used it for.  When the T/W bite would die in the fall, I would check and see if the lake had turned.  If not, keep chuckin', if so,...don't bother, stay deep.  I need to replace my meter, they are only like $50

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love this site....Thanks guys.

I'm off to Winni this weekend and next to develop patterns for the 28th.  Just going to try and do the 'math'.  Given our recent cooldown, I figure the spots where I find them this weekend will be fairly reliable for the month if the weather is somewhat stable.  Breakin' out the heavy lead (3/4-1oz jigs) and maybe swimmin' some white jigs around dying lillies.  Shad or not, I do know they'll hit big targets this time of year, no matter where you are.  Been playing around w/shakey's on docks.  Guess I could twitch a few in the deep grass (15-20').  

Thanks again...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I stick with spinnerbaits when the sun's out and buzzbait's when the sun's in

toss a fluke or bass assasin slurp shad every now and then if they seem 'antsy'

Matt 5.0, who is that in the Vid? Is he from NE? and is he sponsored? (saw the jacket)

thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm originally from Indiana and have only been fishing out here for a few years. Fall has always been my favorite time to fish, but I haven't had the 'go-to' success in New England like I did in the midwest, where we have resevoirs and SHAD!

I last fished the last week of Sept. and the fish hadn't yet committed to a fall pattern. The recent cool weather and rain (thank God) should ease them along toward a feeding binge.

Long story shorter...If I was back home I'd hit the creek arms and points just off them looking for schools of shad getting forced to shore. No shad out here....Winni does have smelt, but should I be following them or sticking to a crawfish pattern (jigs, etc.)? Water temps should be in the mid 50's to 60. I plan on looking for milfoil and other still-green vegetation in 5+' of water, flats in 10-15' of water, mid-lake humps rising from 40+' of water, and anywhere I can find current, although it's illegal here to fish within 250 yards of any tributary this time of year because of the stupid landlocked salmon spawn.

Any solid advice from kind New England folk would be appreciated.

Firstly, Landlocked Salmon kick *** in case you don't know, I fish watchusett all the time, once got an 8 lb landlocked salmon, he would have been yummy but watchusett has a limited ammount of them so i let him go.

Secondly, yes we do have shiners, if they stocked winnapisaki with shiners it would be full of them, and smelt are just as good, if not even better, my friend used to have a cabin on waters that had 7lb brook trout from all the smelt in the pond.

If i were you I'd head into to crick arms anyway, all the trout and smallies, and largies will be filling up on all the salmon roe they can eat, they will be very fat, try and get that lunker or 4lb+ trout

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what about rainy days during the cooler weather? Any specific method people prefer?

EDIT: nevermind. I'll answer my own question after fishing a rainy fall day today  8-)

well "Kozak0085", what I would do is try tossing a bait that stands out against the color of the sky. I'll tend to go with BLACK. Buzzbaits work very well during drizzle and spinnerbaits and senkos while the rain is a bit heavier

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Well, it just goes to show you, I had my tourny on Winni a couple weeks ago, water temps low 50's, air low 40's, wind 20-25, with fair skies.  Couldn't buy a smallmouth, but crushed the largemouth in 2-5' of water!  They were all stuck tight to the shady side of medium sized boulders in the sun.  Rocks HAD to be in the sun to hold em' and weed lines HAD to be within 10 feet or so.  Not enough weight to win though.  Oh well.

The Silver Buddy bite is on now for sure.  I'm off to jig up some pigs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



  • Outboard Engine

    Outboard Engine

    fishing forum

    fishing forum

    fishing tackle

    fishing

    fishing

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.