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Barometric Pressures

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Does anyone have a chart or set of guideliens they follow for barometric pressures. Its common knowledge that falling pressures before a front will cause bass to become active (and vice versa). But falling from what point will cause the inactivity to change and so forth.

This moment is a perfect example for me. The pressure is rising a bit from a passing front but its only at 30.33. Would this still be considered low enough for activity or what? And at what point does is become too low. As you can imagine, with our hurricanes down here we see some very low pressures, even following the storm (Wilma is an exception - and those of you that went through it down here knows what i mean).

Any thoughts or input would be greatly appreciated.

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To be honest my freind I am not exactly sure what the bench marks are. I would say that it varies by degrees on each fish and by the area the fish inhabit. Say in areas that have strong current and have tide influences then it may not have the same affect. I would suggest having a barometer handy when you are fishing, and logging the pressure durring times of really good fishing and when it seems the fish have lock jaw. Longer term weather trends also could make the fish relate differently to the pressure. Sorry I don't have a more rock solid answer. I would hope if I were you that Raul or perhaps RoLo would scroll through. They most likely could give a better answer.

Peter

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Thanks for the info. And iliked the links too. I have been scouring the internet for more info and there is a lot. Here is one my favortue things i have read in many months:

I recall a time many years ago when I helped out Glenn Lau while he was filming his video classic, Bigmouth. Our stage was Florida's Silver River, where about a billion gallons of water spew out every 24 hours and the water temperature stays an almost constant 72 degrees.

The severest of cold fronts can't affect this volume of water, insofar as temperature is concerned. Yet at one point in our filming, a cold front turned off the lunker bass that we had been catching. The temperature of the water just a few inches below the surface hadn't changed, so I pondered what else could have caused the big mood swing in the fish. I asked Glenn to try to determine where all the big bass had gone. He went scuba diving for more than an hour. When he returned, he wore the smile of one who knows something the rest of the world doesn't.

You wouldn't believe what happened to the bigger bass, Lau told me. They were bunched tightly around cypress tree roots, just sitting there not movinglike they were stuffed. I saw one big female literally draped over a root, so stressed she couldn't maintain her equilibrium.

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