Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Gonzo

Foodchain Base

Recommended Posts

Ya know, that's a really good question. I spent the last 20 minutes trying to find specifs on that question, and I had no luck. The one site I thought might have the answer was a pay deal. Sorry I can't help (yet), but I did try for you anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't find where that has occurred in fresh water, not saying it hasn't, but normally, it happens to the coast line and salt water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest ouachitabassangler

That would be a complicated discussion trying to answer. Lethal temperatures vary a lot by coldwater, coolwater, warmwater fisheries, and by fish, zooplankton and phytoplankton species. The target species (bass) would of course be fry through fingerlings which feed on plankton, found in both coolwater and warmwater fisheries, so no one answer applies. In general an upper and lower lethal water temperatures would affect the fish long before the plankton. The temperature extremes all plankton can live in is so diverse across the country. Some can thrive near volcanic vents like in Yellowstone Park, and bacterium can survive in very hot (70C) waters as well as some types of algae. Worms have been taken from the mouth of deep volcanic vents in the oceans.

While temperature extremes can stop growth of plankton, the same extremes could easily kill off fish populations. Temperatures near or above lethal limits for bass could easily cause an imbalance in phytoplankton, resulting in a toxic algal bloom that could directly kill off bass as well as much of the zooplankton, and even shade out the phytoplankton components if thick enough to screen out sunlight.

We have a microbiologist contributing here who should be able to expand on this. I'd have to dig out old textbooks to get more specific. I didn't find much on the web except for trout and oysters.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have lakes in Texas that exceeds 90 degree surface temps, none of them have experienced a plankton kill.  Power plant lakes get that warm in the fall.     I've not heard of it yet, and I read lots of publications that would report something that is critical to our waters.

I would say, you never know what a lake owner dumps into his water trying to kill grass mats in front of his docks.    It happens a lot when authorities don't act on lakes becoming overgrown with aquatic mats.

We do have LMBV, Golden Algae blooms, red tides, so something new wouldn't surprise me.

Gonzo,

What brought this question to lite.    Is this happening some where?   And if so, could you pass it on?

Hookem

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We have lakes in Texas that exceeds 90 degree surface temps, none of them have experienced a plankton kill. Power plant lakes get that warm in the fall. I've not heard of it yet, and I read lots of publications that would report something that is critical to our waters.

I would say, you never know what a lake owner dumps into his water trying to kill grass mats in front of his docks. It happens a lot when authorities don't act on lakes becoming overgrown with aquatic mats.

We do have LMBV, Golden Algae blooms, red tides, so something new wouldn't surprise me.

Gonzo,

What brought this question to lite. Is this happening some where? And if so, could you pass it on?

Hookem

Matt

Well Guys, this ties back into the Why Upill thread........The conclusion I've come to with [help & ideas from my friends here & on this board] is that when the 10" worm is fished uphill it was imitating the the bass' forage but I kept trying to understand just exactly why & what was being imitated by doing this uphill presentation, it's been gnawing @ me for a couple weeks. One of my buddies said it was simple....."the bass think it a shad"  "......"& it is easier to maintain bottom contact". SO........Here's what I think [until somebody comes up with a better explaination] Why are the gizzard shad doing this?  They're feeding on dead plankton that have sunk to the bottom & are feeding uphill simply because it's easier for them. This leads me to ask........why is there a consentration of dead plankton & what killed them? Since I posted this thread I'm wondering how many reasons there is other than just a kill by water temperature. If I can understand more about what's going on I'd know when to use the uphill tactic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW !!!!  It got real quiet.... real quick.........................still thinking about it or have you wrote me off as a nut-case?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Algae grows on vertical and horizontal surfaces.   What made you think its dead plankton?    Plankton are tiny blooms that are pushed across the water by current or wind.   These organisms are not visible to the human eye.     Why do you hear the advice, fish the wind blown banks and points?    Planktons are blown and stacked up on the wind blown points and banks, and shad feed on plankton, so were do you think the shad will be, in that same area, where do you think the bass will be?   In the same area.

I posted articles last year on plankton and shad.

Raul, as some of us call him Dr. Raul, posted numerous threads on Know thy Prey I, II, and III.

They won't answer your questions of why up hill, but will give you understanding on some biologics.    Bass locations are seasonally predictable, getting them to bite is another thing.

Hookem

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm down in the southern most portion of Texas, and the water is hot........very hot (hell, everything is hot).  The vegitation in the water is just exploding.  If anything, I think the hot weather encourages growth (there are certain portions that are just choked with vegitation and the rest of the water is bright green w/ plankton growth)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Algae grows on vertical and horizontal surfaces. What made you think its dead plankton? Plankton are tiny blooms that are pushed across the water by current or wind. These organisms are not visible to the human eye. Why do you hear the advice, fish the wind blown banks and points? Planktons are blown and stacked up on the wind blown points and banks, and shad feed on plankton, so were do you think the shad will be, in that same area, where do you think the bass will be? In the same area.

I posted articles last year on plankton and shad.

Raul, as some of us call him Dr. Raul, posted numerous threads on Know thy Prey I, II, and III.

They won't answer your questions of why up hill, but will give you understanding on some biologics. Bass locations are seasonally predictable, getting them to bite is another thing.

Hookem

Matt

 THat's why I ask questions.............to get more information........to get a better understanding..........to become a better fisherman.    I'd like to read the threads on Know thy Prey I, II, and III. How do I find them? The lake in question has no vegetation but fine algae. Is it true that gizzard shad will eat the mud to in order to feed on the dead plankton? One more question for today.......Is it true that a good spot gets better over time as long as the wind direction remains unchanged?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The primary food source for both bass fry and baitfish fry is the freshwater zooplankton

Daphnia. There are many species of Daphnia and some are invasive. Daphnia are high in vitamin

A which is needed for tissue formation, Vitamin B for appetite and cells, and Vitamin C for developing

the immune system. Daphnia are visable to the naked eye, and can be seen in clear water through

a glass. The Daphnia feed on blue/green algal cells. During warmer months when the water temps

are warmer, both the blue/green algae and the Daphnia can be found in abundance. I am not

aware of any recorded die off due to warmer water. There are several reports of significant decreases

in the number of Daphnia after the application of herbicides to control vegetation.

I am not a proponent of herbicides due to the potential hazards to humans and mortality to fish. Grass Carp can

be sterilized and placed in lakes,etc, to control vegetation and will die when the food source is

exhausted. I love to watch the baby fry from the Share A Lunker program here in Texas gobble

up the enriched Daphnia in their aquariums, and no I don't work at the hatchery. I just consult with

the biologists in charge of the program. But I do have a couple of photos of the bass fry eating the

Daphnia!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing poles

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×
×
  • Create New...