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WhiteMike1018

Bass And Colors (Please Read Important Info)

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I have been reading a very lot lately, about Bass, their environment, and how they see things from a different prespective than we do.

One of the sources I have been reading is "Knowing Bass. The Scientific Approach to Catching More Fish" by Keith A Jones, PhD

In the book it talks about literally everything having to do with bass vision. As well as evey other sense.

Here is a brief paragraph from the book.

"An angler might sit back and ask: Why all theese colors?. Some beauties may be too irresistable to pass up, but does our fishing gear really need to represent the entire visual spectrum? Wouldnt we seem to do just as well with a small handful of colors? Or maybe even pare it down to just one? Who are we really buying our colors for anyway? Ourselves or the bass? Do bass even care about lure colors?"

"The answer is yes and no. Bass apparently do see colors. Their color vision is strongest in the areas of medium-red to green. It fails rapidly moving into the blues and purples, as it does towards the far reds. Theese color extremes are seen as lighter or darker shades of gray to black. Very pale colors of any shade are likely seen as simply light colored, whereas dark reds, greens, blues, and purples are interpreted as simply dark"

Notice how they stressed that the blues and purples are a weak point in bass vision.

The dark reds, greens ,blues and purples, therefore are barely interpretated and register as "dark" almost being black.

From the new Jersey Angler magazine: "Keep it Cool" November 2006

"Research at the university of Kentucky, suggests that bass are more "favorable" toward colors at the cool-end of the color spectrum. The coolest hues being blue and violet as well as various shades of green. Conversely the fish conducted in these labratory experiments to yellow and bright red, as well as other "warm colors"

That is all good information BUT, if a bass's vision falls of on depecting details in color in the cool-side of the color spectrum than why did they show a more tendency to like theese colors?

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Because they see them as the blk/ grey, just like much of their food.  We see a black and blue jig, he sees a dark object shaped like a crayfish.

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the color of the water(stain) and the light penetration into the water causes hues.the colors they see reds to greens are prominent but there are many hues off of those colors that they do see that resemble something theyve seen before

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Good read, good info.. which brings up the question why do we (I) pay for these expensive lures when they cant even see them like we can. The answer is the action (for me) when regarding more of my pricey lures. I am a collector though and a few lures I have will never see water. Any thing with green in it is dynamite for me and by far my favorite color in a lure.

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Google up some info on the nature of light penetration through water. You will find that purple/blue wavelengths penetrate h2o more effectively than any other wavelength (this is why really clean clear water looks blue-blue is the only "color" reaching the bottum). Google up OSU and BASS and you can read about the conditioning of bass as well as some info on the way a bass sees the world- Through a sort of yellowish green tint. Now consider this, if I see everything as more yellow green than say a regular human, those colors will be essentially "filtered out" making their movement stand out (ask anyone who is color blind), and if purple and blue colors are the most visible at depth, then yellow and blue make green and those colors filter and movements jump out. So you would assume in considering this, that blues, purples, greens and yellows (or brown) would be the most visible colors to a fish. Ask your self what colors are crawfish...blue gill...shad (on their back)...herring...you get the idea. Now flash is altogether different, ie. silver...its not really a color, but a light reflector, it reflects most wavelengths of light, so not really the same set of rules.

The most visible and noticable lure would be a black spinnerbait/rattle trap type of combo (black contains every color)

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White Mike 1018, that is the best post on color that I have ever read you did us all a great service and went a long way in thinking of just what colors we use.

I think that everyone has brough up some great points on the colors they use and their ideas behind them. I had heard that red is the first color to disapear in the water...

FIN-S-R, Please excuse me if I am wrong but wouldn't white be the most visible color? White light conains every color in the visible spectrum. The colors we see are as a result to the object only reflecting a particular color. That being said I do beleive that black is a very visisble color, not because of the idea that it contains evry color but is instead sillohetted against the water no matter how dark it is. Hence it is the best color for night fishing.

My rule for fishing had been to use extremes in colors like blacks and whites, and chartrueses for dark water. And more subdued colors for clear water.

Color is awful cotraversal, personally I t hink it all has more to do with confidence than color. The color you pitch the most will catch the most, its just in the water more.

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Boy do I know that! I have a black Explorer and I live in Bama! But as a child and even later into m colllege carreer I had been told that white light contained all of the other colors of the visible spectrum, and when it is shone through a prizm it will break up the visible spectrum and make it so that we might be able to see all of the colors that exist in the visible spectrum.

Most assurredly white reflects and black absorbs. That is because the color white does this not the white light itself. The color white reflects the light back at you and green stuff reflects green light and red stuff red light. And so on and so forth.

I most certainly agree that things that are the color black abzorb the most light and it causes then to heat up.

White light is light that has not been filtered. I am sorry it did look like I was refering to the color white, but I meant unfiltered light. And because of this I believe that because of this fact I like white and black, they are great colors no matter the water clarity or the light factors.

Thanks for bringing that up, I didn't reread it.

Peter

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I think that everyone has brough up some great points on the colors they use and their ideas behind them. I had heard that red is the first color to disapear in the water...  

Red starts to become invisible around 30 feet and beyond. THe coolor colors though, are noted to be seen at several hundred feet, their light waves that is

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