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Smallieslayer2234

Frog Fishing

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When is the best time to throw a top water frog to brush and any other cover you can find

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Read a Dean Rojas article (Day at the Lake, Bass Masters). His advise was that when the bugs are flying and you could hear/see bluegill feeding on them, was the ideal time

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all day long is good , but yea morning and nite are a little better , but you said near cover if they are there they will bite anytime you can tick them off lol

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All day, any day down here.

Exactly!

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During the heat of the summer down here in NC, i have had luck all times of day. Later in the afternoon has been a little more productive, but ive had good success working frogs over mats of hydrilla mid day. The only thing i can really see a difference is in the mornings and evenings it is better for fast retrieve. Or a soft plastic frog. Ive done better with a hollow body durring mid morning to 3 or 4 or so.

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Is a hollow body frog or soft plastic frog like a horny toad better

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Both of them have a place. They are two different types of lures. A horn toad type of frog generally will not float, it is best worked much like you would a buzz bait. You can cover alot of water quickly. A hollow body can be worked at any speed because they float. These lures really shine because you can fish them super slow if you need to and you can work them fast in a walk the dog manner also. The flat bottoms on both types of frogs make them easy to skip under limbs and brush and into cover.

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one of my favorite baits is a sexy frog, or large hollow frog of some sorts. early morning or late afternoon, but if the sun is high and hot, i like to try them on isolated grass mats. work them hard to the edge, and just let it sit. i think the sun up helps make a decent shadow for the bass to locate the frog.

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Frog fishing can be productive through the entire day in a lot of situations. However, I hate to be rude but there are already about 521,297 threads, articles, and videos about frog fishing that could answer your (fairly basic) questions. You could read for an entire day on frog fishing with a little help from google.

But so I don't come across as a complete prude:

1.) Use braid. Always.

2.) A medium heavy / heavy rod with a fast tip will suffice. If you can control yourself to stall your hooksets, an extra fast tip can be downright mean. String said rod with braid.

3.) Wait until you feel the weight of the fish before setting the hook. Setting on the strike will have you ducking frogs all day.

4.) As you set the hook after waiting to feel the weight of the fish, check and make sure that you are using braid.

5.) A watermelon red ribbit with a 4/0 Gamakatsu EWG or even a 5/0 is an great start.

6.) Post pics of your catches in the fishing reports!

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being that the hollow body can be used at any speed i'd use it when bass won't hit something moving faster; when they'll hit a fast moving topwater, i use a ribbit frog almost like a buzzbait, they'll kill it

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I have a whole tackle tray dedicated to my various frogs and take it with me every time I head out once the water temps creep above 53 degrees. My arsenal includes: SPRO and Koppers hollow-bodied frogs, SPRO popping frogs, a SCUM frog (present from my son), a hoard of Stanley Ribbits, Capt. Ken Daubert Clone frogs and my most recent additions a couple of R2S Dahlberg Diving Frogs.

Anyone that is interested in trying frogs should carry various types to be ready for any situation.

Case in point: I was fishing a secluded lake last summer with some fellow kayak anglers. This lake is loaded with pads along the banks that extend out in some places over 20' from the bank. I started with my trusty Ribbit and had multiple short swipes but only a couple hooksets. When I had a short strike, I followed up my moving frog with a stationary frog. In this case, it was the Clone frog and was rewarded with a nice chunky 17".

My two best summertime frog bass to date were:

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-xp9YiTg3naE/TjMJ1pwf9sI/AAAAAAAAAtI/yvBk-b7FQS4/s480/July29_005.jpg

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-YdIGKN8cx2Y/TFNNJVzgVPI/AAAAAAAAADg/LC8IV_wZLfM/s640/SAM_0094.JPG

Both were caught using a Stanley Ribbit.

The Clone frogs are deadly. take a peek....

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Frog fishing can be productive through the entire day in a lot of situations. However, I hate to be rude but there are already about 521,297 threads, articles, and videos about frog fishing that could answer your (fairly basic) questions. You could read for an entire day on frog fishing with a little help from google.

But so I don't come across as a complete prude:

1.) Use braid. Always.

2.) A medium heavy / heavy rod with a fast tip will suffice. If you can control yourself to stall your hooksets, an extra fast tip can be downright mean. String said rod with braid.

3.) Wait until you feel the weight of the fish before setting the hook. Setting on the strike will have you ducking frogs all day.

4.) As you set the hook after waiting to feel the weight of the fish, check and make sure that you are using braid.

5.) A watermelon red ribbit with a 4/0 Gamakatsu EWG or even a 5/0 is an great start.

6.) Post pics of your catches in the fishing reports!

 

I realize many wont agree with me, but I actually use and prefer mono for frog fishing. Im just not a braid guy though, but i have a good hookup ratio with frogs/toads using mono so i have seen no need to change line types. i just love the rage tail toads, they cause a ruckus coming across the water. i fish them on 12lb mono with a 4/0 gamakatsu EWG on a 7ft Medium powered rod

 

as for waiting to feel the weight of the fish to set the hook, i dont do that either. soon as the frog dissappears under water im swinging. i dont count to 3 or any of that, seems like when ive waited to feel the weight of the fish or tried counting to 3 as some recommend the fish has already spit the lure.

 

of course i also think its different for everyone. not everyone has the same reaction time on a hook set or the same swing speed or use the same amount of power. but i have found out over the years unless im using a thick hook i dont need to set the hook in a bass with the force of a jackhammer.

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For the first few years of my bass fishing experience, I strictly used shimano citica D series in medium fast rods with 12lb mono. I caught more than my fair share of frog bass, no doubt. However, I was fortunate enough to grab a new baitcaster at a steal and started upgrading my rods, and finally made a braid setup.

What a difference.

Do you have to buy a whole setup just to frog fish? Not at all! I have hooked plenty of bass on mono. Heck, my PB frog fish was on mono on a MH/XF Powell diesel. I didnt bring the braid rod bc the water visibility was almost ten feet. It handled him just fine.

However, in south La with all of the weeds and pads that we are used to (slop in general) the braid goes a long way in helping boat fish out of the poopy stuff. If I had the choice, I would prefer the braid. If the frog bite dies off, you'll have a decent flipping setup to use as well.

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My current favorite Frog Setup is a Dobyns 735C with a Skeet Reese Revo/Daiwa Zillion High Speed with 65 braid!  Delay on the hookset a little, but not so much that you start counting,reel in the slack if any, and hit them hard/fast.  You will swing small fish in rainbows, but the HAWGS need those hooks to bury in their hard jaws/bones. 

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Here's a few tips for those that choose to use the soft plastic frogs like a Stanley Ribbit with a thick firm back. When you first put the frog on the hook, make sure you work the hook through the plastic back of the frog a couple times. This will help on your hookset. I missed a monster bass this past August when I forgot to do this. I counted 1001, 1002 as I reeled down and set the hook hard. After a quick 5 second fight the big sow spit the frog. When I looked at my frog, the hook shank hadn't penetrated the back or moved one bit. Once I loosened the hook shank path a little, didn't miss a bass the rest of the day.

Also, if you use a scent stick or other attractant, try to avoid getting any on the actual hook shank. This will encourage the frog to slip down the shank a little and may cause it to not run true and turn on its back.

Lastly, after every few casts, check the frog positioning on the hook to ensure it is aligned properly.

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My current favorite Frog Setup is a Dobyns 735C with a Skeet Reese Revo/Daiwa Zillion High Speed with 65 braid!  Delay on the hookset a little, but not so much that you start counting,reel in the slack if any, and hit them hard/fast.  You will swing small fish in rainbows, but the HAWGS need those hooks to bury in their hard jaws/bones. 

Great combo i cant wait to get back on the bass and kill em with this setup/ 

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