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bassfisherman3

Summer High Pressure Fronts?

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I was wondering everyone's opinion on summer high pressure fronts and how they affect bass fishing. Do they affect them the same way as any other cold front or is it different in the summer where the temperatures do not change as drastically? Thanks in advance.

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blue bird sky's and very little wind are the main variables/tighter to cover, deeper. 

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First off, this time of the year, you will find "cold fronts" coming through at various times. Your weather forecast will key you in on these. Usually during a predicted heavy rain/thunder shower. In such an approaching cold front, the barometric pressure drops considerably, thereby affording fish an opportunity to move about (and feed) more freely. Less pressure on their air bladders.

 

Post cold front condition (i.e.: sunny, with blue bird skies, no clouds and sometimes a stiff breeze) the barometric pressure is rising. Until it stablizes (usually a couple of days after the front) the fish will most likely position themselves very tightly to cover, or a bit deeper than they would normally be found. They will not be roaming much. Some folks don't bother fishing post frontal fish. However, in most situations, you can always find some fish to respond. You just have to slow down a bit and employ more a finesse strategy, vs. power fishing.

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First off, this time of the year, you will find "cold fronts" coming through at various times. Your weather forecast will key you in on these. Usually during a predicted heavy rain/thunder shower. In such an approaching cold front, the barometric pressure drops considerably, thereby affording fish an opportunity to move about (and feed) more freely. Less pressure on their air bladders.

 

Post cold front condition (i.e.: sunny, with blue bird skies, no clouds and sometimes a stiff breeze) the barometric pressure is rising. Until it stablizes (usually a couple of days after the front) the fish will most likely position themselves very tightly to cover, or a bit deeper than they would normally be found. They will not be roaming much. Some folks don't bother fishing post frontal fish. However, in most situations, you can always find some fish to respond. You just have to slow down a bit and employ more a finesse strategy, vs. power fishing.

so what your saying is before storm good, after storm bad? Ive always been confused  with when to fish. I have a lot of luck before storms, but just yesterday i had a slow day directly after it stormed.

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Cold fronts effect fishing because of the high pressure associated with them (reguardless of the time of year) and to some extent the increased light penetration.  Florida strain large mouth seem to be more vulnerable to the change than northern strain and river fish less than both.  Not to equate fish behavior to human behavior, but the fish basically become uncomfortable and react in a similar fashion; they attempt to make themselves as comfortable as possible and reducing their activity level is just one way they do so. Their strike zone shrinks, they don't stray far from their 'home', and their appetite is reduced significantly.

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I believe the question is about summer high pressure, not low pressure or cold front.

Summer high pressure is normal weather, hot and dry with mld to high winds depending on high pressure dome. Bass are totally conditioned to this type of weather, so it doesn't affect them.

Summer bass fishing ; lots of food sources available and places the bass can choose to be. This seasonal period is more about your ability to locate the bass, then figure out what they will respond to. Location varies from hour to hour, so plan to be versitle in lieu of force feeding the bass a lure they don't want. Also try to fish during low light periods or at night when summer bass tend to be more active.

Tom

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