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CDobber

Texas Rig Question

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Guys and Gals:

 

What would happen to the action of a T-rig if there was a snap swivel involved instead of tying the hook straight to the line?  I currently have Stealth SpiderWIre 50# test (12# test dia) on and have been experimenting with the T-rig, today being the first day of using it correctly with the bullet weight and no steel leader, snap swivel, etc.  I felt very limited today by that and only that method, and it wasn't producing more than nibbles today.  I would have preferred to throw on my weedless frog and/or try some other methods today but the time commitment to swap between methods (when I was only at one spot for an hour or two each) wouldn't have warranted it.  I was using a 1/0 octopus hook and 7" green pumpkin turtleback worm with curly tail.  Would it drop differently?  Suspend the worm differently upon retrieval?  I suspect one negative will be more weed debris but thought I'd throw it out there...I'm not someone that will carry more than one decent multi-purpose rod and one ultralight on a trip from shore or boat.

 

 

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Just thought of another negative to my question....sure, I could put the swivel on, but then the bullet weight is still there and probably negatively affects any crank, swim or other lure I want to try as bad or more than the swivel would for the T-rig....hmm.....

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Think you answered your own question.

yup. One thing you can do though .... I keep my stuff pretty organized, and it doesn't take me more than a minute to tie on something else. So if you can get to where you can quickly tie a knot and keep your stuff organized, you shouldnt have to worry about snap swivels. I just have more confidence when im tied directly to the hook...

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yup. One thing you can do though .... I keep my stuff pretty organized, and it doesn't take me more than a minute to tie on something else. So if you can get to where you can quickly tie a knot and keep your stuff organized, you shouldnt have to worry about snap swivels. I just have more confidence when im tied directly to the hook...

Organization is pretty solid, knot tying is improving and will likely have to do that to switch back and forth with t-rigs and others...but really don't see a need to tie on my braid to each and every lure when I switch every 20 min or so when I'm not getting a bite (which is most of the time with me).  I still have only amassed enough stuff that it all fits in a tackle box that has a shoulder strap...much like the backpack concept many shorefishers on here would use.

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Anytime i fish a t-rig i always tie direct to lure.You get way more feel for the bait and what its doing. Something i started doing years ago is to keep one finger resting on line and keep as little slack as possible so you can detect light strikes. Also keep an eye on line sometimes it just moves sideways when a fish picks it up and you never feel it. Its by far my favorite way to fish(love that tap)!!! My main setup is 3/16.oz weight with 4/0 hook and 6-7.5" worm.

Good Luck :-)

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Organization is pretty solid, knot tying is improving and will likely have to do that to switch back and forth with t-rigs and others...but really don't see a need to tie on my braid to each and every lure when I switch every 20 min or so when I'm not getting a bite (which is most of the time with me).  I still have only amassed enough stuff that it all fits in a tackle box that has a shoulder strap...much like the backpack concept many shorefishers on here would use.

oh i gotcha. And that's easy for me to say, cause im mostly a flourocarbon man. I know braid can be a littleee bit tougher when it comes to knots...I just cant stand the idea of a 10lbr connected to me only by a little flimsey snap swivel...

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With knot tying practice, your time issue will go away. If I could make one suggestion, I would use a 2/0 offset worm hook instead of the octopus hook. It takes practice, commitment and patience when learning a new technique, especially t-rigging. Sometimes you just can't go slow enough.

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With knot tying practice, your time issue will go away. If I could make one suggestion, I would use a 2/0 offset worm hook instead of the octopus hook. It takes practice, commitment and patience when learning a new technique, especially t-rigging. Sometimes you just can't go slow enough.

diddo about the offset worm hook ...

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Didn't realize you were tying straight braid. You might want to try a flouro leader with the braid. Knot tying becomes a lot easier with that.

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Didn't realize you were tying straight braid. You might want to try a flouro leader with the braid. Knot tying becomes a lot easier with that.

exactly ... took me a min to see that too, and i told him the same thing :)

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Keep a small lighter in your pocket for retying braid. Use it to burn through the line instead of cutting it. It will help speed up your tying and will help keep your knots from slipping. 

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Didn't realize you were tying straight braid. You might want to try a flouro leader with the braid. Knot tying becomes a lot easier with that.

Am I the only one here who thinks that fluoro is harder to tie knots in than braid. I mean all you have to tie is a super simple palomar knot for braid. It's easier than an improved clinch. And to the OP I've seen way to many swivels bend while saltwater fishing.

 

Guys and Gals:

 

What would happen to the action of a T-rig if there was a snap swivel involved instead of tying the hook straight to the line?  I currently have Stealth SpiderWIre 50# test (12# test dia) on and have been experimenting with the T-rig, today being the first day of using it correctly with the bullet weight and no steel leader, snap swivel, etc.  I felt very limited today by that and only that method, and it wasn't producing more than nibbles today.  I would have preferred to throw on my weedless frog and/or try some other methods today but the time commitment to swap between methods (when I was only at one spot for an hour or two each) wouldn't have warranted it.  I was using a 1/0 octopus hook and 7" green pumpkin turtleback worm with curly tail.  Would it drop differently?  Suspend the worm differently upon retrieval?  I suspect one negative will be more weed debris but thought I'd throw it out there...I'm not someone that will carry more than one decent multi-purpose rod and one ultralight on a trip from shore or boat.

Why on earth are you using a steel leader? :crazy:  :Idontknow:

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you should just buy like 10 more combos then you never have to switch off the t-rig for that one rod  :cooking-egg-31:

Now your cooking

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Palomar knot is not easier than improved clinch, no way. I can tie an IC knot in 6 seconds. Line trough the eye, pull slack, spin the line with my thumb and index finger, back through small opening, grab with teeth through big loop (while moistening with my lips) and pull tight. Timed myself, 6 seconds. I'd like to see anyone tie a palomar that easily. 

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I agree with a few of the other responses here, you are likely to lose out on sensitivity by adding a swivel to your rig. At the same time, it may also alter the action of your bait in a new way that the fish in your area might not have seen before. As you well know, it is testing different setups and and techniques that sets new trends and keeps this field evolving, and it's up to you to weigh that out against the potential drawbacks that have been mentioned.

 

One thing that you did say, though, is that you currently get some bites on your rig as you presently fish it. You also said that you are using a 1/0 octopus hook to thread a 7 inch worm. It seems that the bass are interested, but I'm guessing that either the large worm is filling up too much of the hook gap to get a good hookset, or the bass are not getting ahold of enough of it to ingest the actual hook part. Whichever the case may be, you might consider scaling up to a slightly larger hook with a somewhat longer shank. Maybe try a specifically designed worm hook near the 4/0 range. The extra space in the hook gap gives enough clearance to drive the point through both the worm AND the fish's mouth. Also, the added overall length (compared to an octopus hook) would place the barb further back on the body of your bait, giving you a better chance at nabbing those fish that initially strike just a bit short.

 

I'm new to the forum, and so I hope that someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but my general rule of thumb for soft plastics has always been:

 

4 inches = 1/0-2/0 hook

6 inches = 2/0-3/0 hook

8 inches = 4/0-5/0 hook

10 inches = 5/0-6/0 hook

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I use the snaps without swivels for crankbaits, spinnerbaits, buzzbaits and Chatterbaits.

 

I tie directly to all other baits.

 

Time involved with tying a knot is not an issue. Checking your knot to be sure it is still secure and checking your line for knicks, scraps, cuts and abrasions as you fish and after you have caught two fish is more important. Invest the time and you will have fewer lost fish.

 

When fishing plastics do what Deadadrift suggests plus ditch the braid and go with fluorocarbon line. The lightest test you feel comfortable using.

 

You need to keep a finger on the line coming off the reel and also watch your line at all times.

 

Give it a try and I am sure you will be satisfied with your new rig.

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Will have to try some of this stuff out...I am still very much learning and expanding horizons over here.

 

I did actually go to the store the other day looking for a stronger, mono/flouro type leader when I knew I was replacing my steel leader, as I didn't know for sure if a bullet weight would slide nicely on my braid.  The ONLY two choices I had at this Farm and Fleet (not exactly a huge department, I know) at 20# or above was Berkeley Fireline Fused Original and a Power Pro 50# braid, too similar to what I have.  I opted to try the Fireline, but found it next to impossible to try and do an Albright on it (an unfamiliar knot to me to begin with) as the line did not want to wrap cleanly or tightly enough for my liking.   

 

I do have some 3/0 offsets I can try based on your suggestions...I did not get a clear idea of how they were hitting the worm but not hooking as only one or two of the hits even felt strong, and I did not have any bite offs.  

 

Thanks all.

 

 

***EDIT...I normally use a Palomar knot.

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[quote name="CDobber"

I did actually go to the store the other day looking for a stronger, mono/flouro type leader when I knew I was replacing my steel leader opted to try the Fireline, but found it next to impossible to try and do an Albright on it (an unfamiliar knot to me to begin with) as the line did not want to wrap cleanly.....

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So you have 50# spiderwire braid and you are using a 14# fireline fused leader? that makes no sense what so ever. 

 

Either use no leader at all or get some quality 14# mono or fluoro for a leader. 

Up it to either a 3/0 or 4/0 worm hook, texas rigged. 

Use no hardware at all, tie directly to the hook. 

 

Your catch rate will go through the roof if you rig everything up correctly. 

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Texas rig on straight braid is my go to technique. I have found that the most important thing in a texas rig is the rate of fall. I switch the size of weight i use until i find out what they want that day. I have also found that a texas rig can cover most every scenario you need be it jiggin the worm or swimming or reeling it on topwater. I really dont switch too much from my texas rigs

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Welcome to the forum, CDobber.  Couple things:

 

You don't want a swivel or snap in your T-rig recipe; best feel is directly through the line.

 

So then, your line... you could probably tie green braid directly to the hook; I personally like the improved clinch knot because I can tie it with less waste.  I doubt the fish can see your line very well in the low-visibility waters around Madison (is that Warner Park or Wingra Park in your profile pic?) unless you're using white or yellow braid.

 

If you decide to use a leader but don't want to give up on your Fireline and buy yet more line, try using an Alberto knot to join the lines, but tie it backwards; that is, make the bend in the Fireline and do all the wrapping with the much more cooperative braid. Trim the tag ends super close with a small wire cutter or side-cutter.  Not ideal, but it'll fish.

 

Keep at least slight tension on your line at all times, as braid doesn't have great slack-line sensitivity.

 

Lastly, when I first started using T-rigs, I was using a weight that tipped the scales somewhere between bowling ball and anvil because I could cast it pretty far, but I quickly realized that using a lighter weight would actually allow the bait to fall through the shallow water I fish over a period of seconds, instead of nanoseconds.  It made a huge difference.

 

Good luck!

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Palomar knot is not easier than improved clinch, no way. I can tie an IC knot in 6 seconds. Line trough the eye, pull slack, spin the line with my thumb and index finger, back through small opening, grab with teeth through big loop (while moistening with my lips) and pull tight. Timed myself, 6 seconds. I'd like to see anyone tie a palomar that easily. 

I can't tie it in 6 seconds, but I have no reason to tie it in 6seconds. I'd rather spend 5 minutes tying a knot and have it tied correctly than tie a knot in 6 seconds and tie it incorrectly. It  takes me about 20 seconds to tie a palomar, but I can tie it on the first try. An improved clinch takes me a minute because I can't get it in the small loop.  If you can tie an overhand knot than you can tie a palomar. The palomar is actually the first knot I learned to tie. I've never tried to tie a knot at full speed any way, as I don't see a reason to.

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So you have 50# spiderwire braid and you are using a 14# fireline fused leader? that makes no sense what so ever. 

 

Either use no leader at all or get some quality 14# mono or fluoro for a leader. 

Up it to either a 3/0 or 4/0 worm hook, texas rigged. 

Use no hardware at all, tie directly to the hook. 

 

Your catch rate will go through the roof if you rig everything up correctly. 

I agree. If you even have some leftover on an old spool of mono it would work for now.

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Check out the J-knot for using to tie leader on mainline, much easier to me than Albright. Been using it on my dropshot rig no problems. Seaguar knot super easy but not as strong but better than uni-uni knot.

What size of water you fishing and clarity?

Using a baitcaster or spinning setup?

Went to a Cabela's for the first time as I was on the east side of Wisconsin the last few days...found Berkley's Vanish in a much smaller package meant for leaders....25# flouro, so I just put that on my braid, and did the J knot as suggested.  I don't know if I like the size of the knot as far as a catch zone for pulling through weeds long term, but not sure its any different than an albright or others, will give it a shot.  Size of water ranges from Lake Mendota at 10,000 acres to a former quarry that is probably 10 acres.  Shore and from pontoon on lakes.  Water clarity between muddy and murky, algae in the water column mainly.  Lots of weeds to rip through, especially in quarry. or shore fishing many of the spots I've tried, especially anything not top water.  All spinning setup, have never tried a baitcaster.

 

So you have 50# spiderwire braid and you are using a 14# fireline fused leader? that makes no sense what so ever. 

 

Either use no leader at all or get some quality 14# mono or fluoro for a leader. 

Up it to either a 3/0 or 4/0 worm hook, texas rigged. 

Use no hardware at all, tie directly to the hook. 

 

Your catch rate will go through the roof if you rig everything up correctly. 

I hope the catch rate goes up...and I agree with you, the 14# wouldn't have made much sense, especially after trying to albright with it (though I had 20#, which isn't much better)....and so many swear by the fluoro on here I thought I'd give it a shot, will compare it long term to tying knots with the braid. Gonna put a 3/O on now though instead of the 1/O at yours and others' suggestions. and continue to try.

 

 

Welcome to the forum, CDobber.  Couple things:

 

You don't want a swivel or snap in your T-rig recipe; best feel is directly through the line.

 

So then, your line... you could probably tie green braid directly to the hook; I personally like the improved clinch knot because I can tie it with less waste.  I doubt the fish can see your line very well in the low-visibility waters around Madison (is that Warner Park or Wingra Park in your profile pic?) unless you're using white or yellow braid.

 

If you decide to use a leader but don't want to give up on your Fireline and buy yet more line, try using an Alberto knot to join the lines, but tie it backwards; that is, make the bend in the Fireline and do all the wrapping with the much more cooperative braid. Trim the tag ends super close with a small wire cutter or side-cutter.  Not ideal, but it'll fish.

 

Keep at least slight tension on your line at all times, as braid doesn't have great slack-line sensitivity.

 

Lastly, when I first started using T-rigs, I was using a weight that tipped the scales somewhere between bowling ball and anvil because I could cast it pretty far, but I quickly realized that using a lighter weight would actually allow the bait to fall through the shallow water I fish over a period of seconds, instead of nanoseconds.  It made a huge difference.

 

Good luck!

It was Wingra, and yes to confirm your comments about water clarity, the water clarity is somewhere between murky and muddy on all the locations I've tried from shore or from pontoon.  I have been using a 1/8 oz bullet, though I also have 1/4...was going for a slower drop rate as well.  Braid is moss green, though the coloring seems to fade quickly and its become a very light green but not yet white and certainly not yellow.  Have been trying a drop to the bottom, a few tugs with pauses, a few reels, same tug/pause, and do that a couple more times before reeling in slow to utilize the curly tail on the green pumpkin worm.  Will try a finger on the line as suggested, though have been training myself to watch the line much better.

 

Thanks much for everyone that has chimed in...I greatly value your knowledge and experience.

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