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What Is The Easiest Safe Knot To Tie A Kayak To The Stern And Bow Area?

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Hi everyone,

 

I am seeking a safe, easy and effective knot, so I can tie down my kayak to the bow and stern. I will be traveling at highway speeds up to 70mph.

 

Thanks in advance ! I will be watching comments but may not be able to respond quickly!

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Buy some bow and stern tie downs and don't fool with the knots....thule makes a nice set as does yakima and both will be more reliable than your knots.

 

http://www.thule.com/en-us/us/products/carriers-and-racks/water-sport-carriers/water-sports-carrier-accessories/thule-quickdraw-855xt-_-85500999

 

http://www.yakima.com/shop/water/water-accessories/bowstern-tie-down

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Thank you! However, I was looking to use knots for now (something more economical). I do like the systems that you suggested for me. I'm already invested in a Walmart $25 tie down system. If Walmart will issue me a full refund, I will invest in something better. I should have asked people online before I purchased the Walmart tie down system.

 

I do not like making a chore of loading and unloading my kayak. Trust me, eventually I will purchase one of the types of systems that you suggested.

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THe other thing to remember is that the bow and stern tie downs aren't really there to hold down the baot per se, that job is accomplished via the cross straps used.  The bow and stern tie downs are more for preventing the boat from lifting up due to wind and in the case of an accident, flyng forward or backwards off the vehicle.  I rarely crank mine down to tight.

 

Here is a great write up.....and i know plenty of people who use this method.

 

http://www.kayakbassfishing.com/kbfbb3/viewtopic.php?f=65&t=1377&p=166025

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I use an Alpine Butterfly loop for an anchor point then several half hitches and secure the tag end with a slip.

 

This is how my Grandfather taught me 40 years ago and it has worked ever since.  I did have to look up the names of the knots to explain it though.

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Not that the front and rear tie down's aren't necessary, but if you have a proper kayak carrier on top of your roof racks and use proper tie down straps, you will not need the front and rear tie downs.  I use ratcheting straps and an INNO kayak carrier on my car and I've never had my kayak's move or even budge after strapping them down.

 

If you are using foam blocks and not a roof rack then yes I absolutely would use front and rear tie downs.  Austin Kayak has a nice kit that uses hood/trunk loops and ratchet ropes that work well for this.

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Thanks to everyone for responding! I'm researching the ideas and suggestions that you've posted and will be practicing tying knots to find out what type of knot works best for me.

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Not that the front and rear tie down's aren't necessary, but if you have a proper kayak carrier on top of your roof racks and use proper tie down straps, you will not need the front and rear tie downs.  I use ratcheting straps and an INNO kayak carrier on my car and I've never had my kayak's move or even budge after strapping them down.

 

If you are using foam blocks and not a roof rack then yes I absolutely would use front and rear tie downs.  Austin Kayak has a nice kit that uses hood/trunk loops and ratchet ropes that work well for this.

This is dependent on the length of your boat and the spread of your bars.  My rule of thumb is if my bars are less than 2/3 the length of the boat i am using front and rear tie down straps.  It doesn't take much force to start to lift a boat and carnage ensues. I would also caution against ratchets straps as they can put a lot of pressure on both the boat and the rack system depending on how they are run.  I have also seen deforming of hulls from doing this in the heat.  Generally it pops right back out but still worth mentioning.  I prefer cam buckle straps myself easier as they are easier to use.

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This is dependent on the length of your boat and the spread of your bars.  My rule of thumb is if my bars are less than 2/3 the length of the boat i am using front and rear tie down straps.  It doesn't take much force to start to lift a boat and carnage ensues. I would also caution against ratchets straps as they can put a lot of pressure on both the boat and the rack system depending on how they are run.  I have also seen deforming of hulls from doing this in the heat.  Generally it pops right back out but still worth mentioning.  I prefer cam buckle straps myself easier as they are easier to use.

I guess I can agree with that...My kayaks are only 11' so I've never had a length problem needing front and rear straps, and while they do deform a bit when I strap them down with the ratchet straps, I've never had a problem with them not popping back out.  No worse that when I used to buckle straps that tended to losen up on me.

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