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Thoughts On This Lake!

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I want to know what you guys thought about this lake, talking about possible locations or more specifically, pre-spawn. The main species in this lake are bluegill, crappie, northern pike, perch, and largemouth and (few) smallmouth bass. No rocks, no wood.

 

Satellite

post-51387-0-80522500-1422411830_thumb.j

 

Topographical

post-51387-0-07554200-1422411835_thumb.j

 

I know these are tough to call without actually being there, but I want to hear your thoughts!

 

Bald Eagle Lake is a natural lake located in Oakland County, Michigan.

Lake Area: 149 acres
Island: 24 acres
Lake Surface: 125 acres
Max. Depth: 26 feet
Mean Depth: 7.3 feet

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I'm not familiar with lakes that contain a marl bottom, but i have read they will use it to spawn. I'd start by focusing on the transitions found around the two flats on the west side of the lake. If they use those marl flats to spawn, in prespawn they will stage on the edges or transitions relating to these marl flats. I'd focus on spots that would link good wintering spots to these flats. The point directly above where the name of the lake is located looks like it would be good as well as any points located within the flats. Areas that transition from sand to marl within those flats should hold fish as well. Docks are probably the main thing I would focus on though, especially the ones located around anything I have previously mentioned.post-50907-0-47556300-1422415190_thumb.j

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Do the defined point in the upper middle of the lake, or the steep drop off the east shore have any significance? Maybe after the spawn?

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The defined point you are talking about is probably worth hitting on every trip. When the ice melts, I'd hit up that steeper side of lake, especially those docks along it.

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Also, I just recognized that bridge. Another good spot.

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Fish squarbill cranks like spro little johns as spawn comes around. As the lake is not deep that's all youll need is a squarbill.

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Fish squarbill cranks like spro little johns as spawn comes around. As the lake is not deep that's all youll need is a squarbill.

Awesome, appreciate the help man.

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On the last Saturday in April, paddle that yak to the south half of the lake, turn west into that large shallow cove and work your way towards or into the boat channels until you find fish.  I'd start searching with a bait that covers quite a bit of water.  Two lures fit that bill perfectly in the spring.  Arm yourself with a jerkbait, and a spinnerbait.  My choices for these are:

 

Jerkbait - LC Pointer 78, Husky Jerk, or Rattlin' Rouge. 

 

Spinnerbait - Thinking small in size, Strike King makes a small version, or perhaps an 1/8oz beetle spin.

 

If you find them back in the channels, make sure that you work slowly as those fish will be quite spooky in such a confined space.  Pickup a few tubes or a K&E Worm that you can fan cast far ahead of you and keep a low profile.  Target both sides and the middle before you move forward.

 

As you get closer to the spawn (think 60* water temps) take a cruise along any shoreline with a hard bottom between 2' to 8' in depth.  Look closely around any new weed growth and especially the inside edge.  You can always look in those coves, but I suspect that the marl bottom has a pretty good layer of silt built on it. The Google Earth picture doesn't show the normal blue/green reflection of exposed marl.  If you've fished this lake during prior spawning seasons, you should know where their spawning beds are going to be.  The bass won't be too far away from those areas, just a little deeper.

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On the last Saturday in April, paddle that yak to the south half of the lake, turn west into that large shallow cove and work your way towards or into the boat channels until you find fish.  I'd start searching with a bait that covers quite a bit of water.  Two lures fit that bill perfectly in the spring.  Arm yourself with a jerkbait, and a spinnerbait.  My choices for these are:

 

Jerkbait - LC Pointer 78, Husky Jerk, or Rattlin' Rouge. 

 

Spinnerbait - Thinking small in size, Strike King makes a small version, or perhaps an 1/8oz beetle spin.

 

If you find them back in the channels, make sure that you work slowly as those fish will be quite spooky in such a confined space.  Pickup a few tubes or a K&E Worm that you can fan cast far ahead of you and keep a low profile.  Target both sides and the middle before you move forward.

 

As you get closer to the spawn (think 60* water temps) take a cruise along any shoreline with a hard bottom between 2' to 8' in depth.  Look closely around any new weed growth and especially the inside edge.  You can always look in those coves, but I suspect that the marl bottom has a pretty good layer of silt built on it. The Google Earth picture doesn't show the normal blue/green reflection of exposed marl.  If you've fished this lake during prior spawning seasons, you should know where their spawning beds are going to be.  The bass won't be too far away from those areas, just a little deeper.

 

What have your experiences been like with a marl bottom and jigs or other traditionally bottom-contact lures like crankbaits?

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What have your experiences been like with a marl bottom and jigs or other traditionally bottom-contact lures like crankbaits?

 

My experience has taught me that there isn't anything worth throwing if you are dealing with a true marl bottom lake.  Marl, which is a combination of clay and calcium-carbonate doesn't allow for much in the way of weed growth and therefor doesn't hold much in the way of fish.  When I see a white chalky looking lake bottom I keep moving until I find better options.

 

A true marl bottom in the spring just doesn't have anything going for it.  It lacks weeds and because it doesn't have a dark bottom, it is slower to warm up than other darker bottoms such as muck.  That is the reason I asked if the marl was exposed, or if it was covered with a layer of darker muck type material. 

 

I guess the only way that you'll find out what works and what doesn't is to give them a try. 

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